The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Fashion"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Fashion found 785 posts

The Fabric of Friendship

Back to my Salem singlewomen shopkeepers and businesswomen: they continue to be my favorite subjects among these #SalemSuffrageSaturday posts. Socialites, authors and artists: too easy! I came across one of the most stunning nineteenth-century photographs...
From: streets of salem on 1 Aug 2020

The Grande Dame

We know her instantly when we see her: from her famous John Singer Sargent portrait painted 20 years later: she is Ellen Peabody Endicott, the Grande Dame of Salem, Boston, and Washington society, standing right behind the bride at the first presidential...
From: streets of salem on 25 Jul 2020

Dandy in Distress

The Exquisite, Alias Dandy in Distress, is so buttoned up and laced in that he can't pick up his fallen kerchief! This image illustrates a letter from a correspondent (beneath the image) who has concerns about modern fashions... Via the Lewis Walpole...

June 17

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “Proposes to return as soon as the Importation is opened.” Although many colonists promoted “domestic manufactures” as alternative to imported goods...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 17 Jun 2020

The Colour of Mourning

I accidentally came across this trade card below, for a Matthias Otto of The Strand, London, and for those who are regular readers of All Things Georgian, you will no doubt be aware of my interest in trade cards, but something about this one specific...
From: All Things Georgian on 17 Jun 2020

June 16

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “They may depend on having their Commands executed after the newest and most genteel Fashions.” When Daniel Stillwell, a tailor, placed an advertisement in the June...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 16 Jun 2020

Inside a Milliners Shop – a morning ramble.

At present I am researching milliner’s shops in the 1780s – an esoteric subject, I appreciate, but one which is fascinating. It is part of my research into the life of an actress who will be featured in my next-book-but-one, on whores, harlots...
From: Georgian Gentleman on 19 May 2020

The Unveiling of Salem Women

A big transition here from New Deal Salem to Governor Endicott’s Salem but I am joyfully skittering back to the early modern era for #SalemSuffrageSaturday after spending too much time in the twentieth century for the #Salemtogether project of the...
From: streets of salem on 16 May 2020

Getting Dressed in 18th Century - 1780s - 1790 {Video}

Let's get dressed!Hi Lovelies!I made a short video showing the steps and pieces of getting dressed in a 1780s Italian gown or Robe a l'Anglaise. I know for new costumers all the layers and which order they go in can be a bit confusing.(*I forgot my pocket...

Early American Women Unmasked

A special edition of #ColonialCouture, a Junto roundtable on fashion as history in early American life.  Protective face coverings have emerged as a potent, multifaceted metaphor for the Covid-19 pandemic. Despite inconsistent examples set by elected...
From: The Junto on 5 May 2020

The Haube, a Simple Cap For 18tC Pennsylvania Moravian Sisters

Unknown Artist, Moravian Single Sister, Moravian Historical Society, Nazareth, PAThe head-covering worn is this painting is a Schwestern Haube, a sister's cap. A Haube is a simple, close-fitting cap worn by Moravian women, sometimes referred to as a Schneppel...
From: 18th-century American Women on 26 Apr 2020

Getting dressed – Jane and Cassandra Austen

Inquiring readers, Kevin Lindsey, who frequently comments to posts on this blog, forwarded the link to this 5-minute YouTube video. He writes: As a long time subscriber to your blog, I thought you might be interested in this. It’s from a British...
From: Jane Austen's World on 26 Mar 2020

Louisiana 18C - Race determined the Woma's place in the Social Hierarchy & even mandated Headwear

The tignon was the mandatory headwear for Creole women in Louisiana during the Spanish colonial period, and the style was adopted throughout the Caribbean island communities as well. This headdress was required by Louisiana laws in 1785. Called the...
From: 18th-century American Women on 23 Mar 2020

Georgian Perfume

Today I thought we would take a look at some Georgian recipes for making perfume, most of them are still feasible to make at home today with some minor adjustments. To perfume clothes Take of oven-dried cloves, cedar and rhubarb wood, once ounce of each...
From: All Things Georgian on 18 Mar 2020

Copley Cousins

Two portraits of young Salem women of the mid-eighteenth century, both named Mary and newly-wed, painted by John Singleton Copley wearing the same dress! Whether you’re delving into the reform-minded Salem women of the nineteenth century or the...
From: streets of salem on 7 Mar 2020

More Big Hair -- Higher, Higher, Higher

French Fashion Plates 1777 French Fashion Plates 1777 French Fashion Plates 1777 French Fashion Plates 1777 French Fashion Plates 1777 French Fashion Plates 1777
From: 18th-century American Women on 29 Feb 2020

An Interesting Take on 18th Century Shoes

.James Gillray: Fashionable Contrasts; – or – the Duchess's little shoe yeilding to the magnitude of the Duke's foot, originally published by Hannah Humphrey on January 24, 1792.The print shows the feet & ankles of the Duke & Duchess...
From: 18th-century American Women on 27 Feb 2020

February 25

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “The Best accounts of fashions have been sent over by every packet.” Thomas Charles Willett listed “A Great Variety” of garments, textiles, adornments,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 25 Feb 2020

February 21

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “The Taylor’s Business is carried on in all its branches.” When Jonathan Remington, a tailor, moved to a new location early in 1770, he placed an advertisement...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 21 Feb 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.