The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Fashion"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Fashion found 749 posts

A Child’s 18th Century Lace Stomacher

Carefully preserved in the collections of the Pilgrim Hall Museum in Plymouth, MA. is a diminutive stomacher (Accession #PHM111A). Made for a member of the Standish family, it is 8 inches long and 6 inches wide at the widest point. Triangular in shape,...
From: SilkDamask on 12 Aug 2019

A Textile Portrait in Purple and White, c. 183

I am so taken with this elegant portrait of a fashionable sitter, c. 1830. I have a fragment only-- one section of the repeat. The original textile from the Cooper Hewitt (collection.cooperhewitt.org), shows two women set within decorative medallions. Seen...
From: SilkDamask on 24 Jul 2019

The Duchess of Devonshire’s Public Breakfast at Chiswick House, 18

Today, we’re taking you back in time to a public breakfast given by Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire at the end of June 1802, at her villa, Chiswick House. Public it might have been, but entry was only for those ‘of note’ in the fashionable...
From: All Things Georgian on 25 Jun 2019

King George III’s 70th birthday

King George III celebrated his 70th birthday on 4 June 1808. George III on on of Windsor Castle’s terraces; Peter Edward Stroehling; Royal Collection Trust The king was losing his eyesight and, because of this, wasn’t present at his birthday...
From: All Things Georgian on 4 Jun 2019

Leverett Family Petticoat Returns to Colonial Williamsburg

The Leverett family quilted petticoat, reproduced from a pattern created by pricking the design onto muslin, has been returned to the makers at the Margaret Hunter Shop, Milliners and Mantuamakers at Colonial Williamsburg. The pricking was in the...
From: SilkDamask on 27 May 2019

Princess Charlotte of Wales’ Russian dress, 1817

We recently ran a post on our Facebook page which shared images of Princess Charlotte of Wales in a blue Russian style dress. It proved really popular, so we thought we’d take the opportunity to look at the dress, and the portrait of Charlotte where...
From: All Things Georgian on 21 May 2019

Cracking Open the Treasure Chest

There are two notable developments regarding the Phillips Library of the Peabody Essex Museum (PEM), the major archival source of Salem’s history, so (fair warning) I am returning to that troublesome topic. I don’t think I’ve written...
From: streets of salem on 19 May 2019

Regency Swimwear

We have previously written about the very popular invention of the Georgian bathing machines, so it’s time to take a look at what people wore to take a dip in the sea. It was in the Regency era that swimwear became really popular and very much a...
From: All Things Georgian on 14 May 2019

The Latest in Mourning Wear: Advice from Harper’s Bazar, 1901

“Crepe is more fashionable than ever” notes the November 1901 edition of Harper’s Bazar. “House gowns and dinner gowns made entirely of crepe and in the princesse style are exceedingly becoming, while there is permitted on crepe...
From: SilkDamask on 9 May 2019

May 6

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Providence Gazette (May 6, 1769). “Will engage to make Wigs as can be had there.” When Benjamin Gladding, a “PERUKE MAKER and HAIR-DRESSER,” advertised in...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 6 May 2019

Timeline 1700-1709 + Paintings of American Women

1700Population of the British American colonies: about 260,000 people. Boston has 7,000 people and New York, 5000. Jewish population of America numbers between 200 and 300.Massachusetts representative assembly orders all Roman Catholic priests to vacate...
From: 18th-century American Women on 26 Jun 2013

Reports of Native Americans Influencing Fashion in 17C Europe

Jan Boeckhorst (Flemish, c1604-1668) c 1630 Portrait of Helena Fourment, 2nd wife of the artist Peter Paul Rubens at Royal Museum of Fine Arts AntwerpThomas Lechford (c 1590-1644) was an English lawyer who wrote about his experiences in the Massachusetts...
From: 17th-century American Women on 17 Apr 2019

Mrs. Catherine Donovan, Dressmaker to the NYC Elite

Irish–born dressmaker to New York’s elite, Mrs. Catherine Donovan (1826?-1906), studied fashion in Paris. Donovan created her gowns in her fashionable shop and showroom in New York. By 1900, she was located on Madison Avenue. In addition to...
From: SilkDamask on 7 Apr 2019

Mirror of History

Louis XIV famously once said Fashion is the mirror of history but as we all know, sometimes mirrors show us things we don’t want to see. I was looking around for some inspiration for my Resistance Ball dress, when I discovered the work of an...
From: streets of salem on 5 Apr 2019

Invisible dresses? Oh, knickers!

With the turn for the century, fashions began to change from the tight-laced bodiced dresses to a softer, flimsy and floating style, often made from lightweight fabrics. Presumably it was this change of style that required women to preserve their modesty,...
From: All Things Georgian on 28 Mar 2019

The practicalities of wearing riding habits, and riding ‘en cavalier’

We’ve written about Georgian era riding habits in an earlier blog, but this time we’re looking at the practicalities of wearing one. Female equestrians in the eighteenth- and nineteenth-centuries were certainly hampered by their clothes, in...
From: All Things Georgian on 12 Mar 2019

Timeline 1750-1759

1750Over a million people live in colonial America.The British Parliament passes The Iron Act, limiting the growth of the iron industry in the American ColoniesThe word "bluestocking," is used as a put-down for learned women.Neoclassicism as a reaction...
From: 18th-century American Women on 30 Jun 2013

Grand Opening of the Museum of Historical Costume in Poznan, Poland

In the fashion world everything has already happened. Moreover, that phrase is suitable not only to the latest fashion week shows releases. History confirms that fashion constantly balances between the past and the future for ages. The greatest proof...
From: Jane Austen's World on 3 Mar 2019

A Study in Pink: Two Silk Victorian Dresses, c. 187

A 1871 pink silk dress with day and evening bodices, maker unknown; French.A lovely way to study design - both dresses are made of silk, with varying use of fringe (passementerie), self-fabric trim and lace -- with very different results.More: http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/98301?rpp=20&pg=7&ft=*&deptids=8&when=A.D.%2B1800-1900&what=Dresses%7CSilk&img=4&imgno=5&tabname=related-objectsA...
From: SilkDamask on 5 Feb 2019

Editorial Reviews for Treasures Afoot: Shoe Stories from the Georgian Era

Have you seen the editorial reviews for Treasures Afoot?"In this lavishly illustrated, meticulously researched book, Kimberly Alexander tells the fascinating, hitherto untold story of the shoe in early America—of the cordwainers who made them, the...
From: SilkDamask on 2 Feb 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.