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Search Results for "First Folio"

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Your search for posts with tags containing First Folio found 46 posts

Shakespeare annotated: John Milton’s First Folio

(c) Christ’s College, University of Cambridge; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation Over the last few weeks the hottest story in Shakespeare studies has been the identification of a First Folio in the Free Library of Philadelphia’s...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 11 Oct 2019

King John in Print and Performance

By Andrew Brown, Yale University. Blog Post 1: King John in Print and Performance Andrew Brown is a Ph.D. student at Yale and was one of the recipients of a Sir Stanley Wells Shakespeare Studentship, via the American Friends of the Shakespeare Birthplace...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 7 Aug 2017

Generic excitement

Give ear, I pray you, and mark it attentively, for you shall hear the tenor of a strange and tragical comedy. Anthony Munday, Zelauto (1580) Genre: what is it, what does it mean, and how does it organise our experiences in the theatre, in a book or in...
From: Before Shakespeare on 27 Apr 2017

Folger copy 54: From family library to research library

Folger First Folio number 54 traveled over 10,000 miles from Washington D.C., to San Diego California and Honolulu, Hawaii, during our First Folio! The Book That Gave Us Shakespeare tour, and is on view in our Great Hall through January 22, 2017. But...
From: The Collation on 17 Jan 2017

“that which knitteth souls and prospers loves”: A Midwinter Dreame

Modular 1980 Christmas card, designed by C. Walter Hodges, for the Detroit Project.¶This post inaugurates a new series here on Bite Thumbnails explicitly dedicated to the Portland-area first folio technique company, the Original Practice Shakespeare...
From: Bite Thumbnails on 24 Dec 2016

The Mysterious Case of Folger First Folio 33

Shakespeare’s First Folio has been under the microscope for centuries, studied by historians, students of literature, and actors, as well as by those who are convinced that the works of the Bard are hiding something. As many of you may have discovered...
From: The Collation on 15 Dec 2016

Sophisticating the First Folio

This week we will continue our discussion of the First Folios currently on display in the Folger Shakespeare Library exhibition, First Folio! Shakespeare’s American Tour. This post will look at their “sophistication.” A “sophisticated”...
From: The Collation on 13 Dec 2016

Scissors inside books?

The rusty outline we showed in last week’s Crocodile post is, as one of our responders, Giles Bergel, correctly guessed, from a pair of scissors. It appears in Folger First Folio number 58, in Henry IV, part 1 (pp. 50-51). This First...
From: The Collation on 6 Dec 2016

Celebrating Ben Jonson’s First Folio

Ben Jonson As well as being the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death, 1616 is also a significant date for anyone interested in the theatre and writing of the period. Between 6 and 25 November 1616 Ben Jonson’s Workes was published, a...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 10 Nov 2016

Shakespeare in Miniature

The Poet of them All They say all the best things come in small packages, and it’s certainly true that we all find small things, that seem to defy the normal, fascinating. It’s easy to see why some things, like miniature paintings, came to...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 27 Jul 2016

Shakespeare in Sydney

The State Library of New South Wales On Tuesday we visited what is called on the website, “one of the most unusual places in Australia”, the Shakespeare Room at the State Library of New South Wales, that stands just across the road from the...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 23 Jul 2016

Wheler’s Folio

Some of the Shakespeare’s Birthplace Trust’s most valuable books were donations, such as the so called ‘Wheler Folio’ named after its donor: Miss Anne Wheler.  It’s a First Folio of Shakespeare’s works published...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 15 Apr 2016

First Folio discovery on the Isle of Bute

The Isle of Bute folio, bound in three volumes It’s only two weeks or so since it was announced that an unknown copy of the 1616 Shakespeare First Folio had been found at Shuckburgh House in Warwickshire (see my blog on 24 March), and now another...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 7 Apr 2016

1616 was only the beginning: Shakespeare’s Folios

This year we are marking 400 years since the death of William Shakespeare. This does not mean that we are declaring a year of mourning however, it is a chance to celebrate the ever-developing legacy of Shakespeare and think about everything that...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 2 Apr 2016

First Folios Everywhere!

The Folger—actually, the world!—is in full swing celebrating 400 years of Shakespeare, as we send Shakespeare’s First Folio to every US state, Washington D.C. and Puerto Rico this year.  You’ve heard us talk about the tour...
From: Folger Shakespeare Library on 24 Mar 2016

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

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Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

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For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

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The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.