The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing Food found 875 posts

Food Identity Standards and Recipes as Legislation

By Clare Gordon Bettencourt  In 1933, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) organized an exhibit that came to be known as the Chamber of Horrors. The horrors on display were examples of packaging intended to deceive consumers. The...
From: The Recipes Project on 7 Jan 2021

“I believe they are a smuggling”

With less than two weeks left in 2020, there are still some significant events in 1770 that I missed discussing on their Sestercentennials, so I’m trying to catch up. The first of those events took place on 18 May and centered on Owen Richards,...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Dec 2020

Contributor Question: What is Your Favorite Beverage of the Revolutionary Era?

This month, we asked our contributors: With many different holidays and celebrations approaching, what is your favorite beverage known to have been consumed during... The post Contributor Question: What is Your Favorite Beverage of the Revolutionary Era?...

Feeding and Housing the Boston Massacre Jury

In addition to the costs of the defense in the first two Boston Massacre trials, we also have the second jury’s expense account.Normally a jury would produce minimal expenses. Even murder trials were supposed to be over in a day. After jurors retired...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Dec 2020

4. Meals on Wheels: The “Kitchen Cars” and American Recipes for the Postwar Japanese Diet

By Nathan Hopson From 1956 to 1960, the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS) sponsored a fleet of food demonstration buses in Japan (“kitchen cars”) to improve national nutrition and fuel the nation’s economic recovery with more “modern”...
From: The Recipes Project on 10 Dec 2020

Christmas Pye, Georgian Style, and other British Holiday Foods by Vic Sanborn

“I wish you a cheerful and at times even a Merry Christmas.” Jane Austen While Christmas festivities were not as commercial as they were during Queen Victoria’s and our time, families during Jane Austen’s era celebrated the holiday...
From: Jane Austen's World on 8 Dec 2020

The Dance Will Go On!

There is no contest for me: my favorite Salem event has always been the Christmas Dance at Hamilton Hall: I have never missed it in all the years I’ve lived in Salem, even in the one year I had to go alone. Last year I was in terrible pain from...
From: streets of salem on 28 Nov 2020

Abigail Adams’s Quiet Thanksgiving in 1798

On 29 Nov 1798, Abigail Adams sat down to an unusually small Thanksgiving dinner. An autumn Thanksgiving feast was an important tradition in New England, and in October Massachusetts’s governor, Increase Sumner, issued a proclamation naming the...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Nov 2020

Around the Table: Events

By Sarah Peters Kernan Last month, many Recipes Project contributors and readers participated in a virtual conference on Food and the Book: 1300-1800. This exciting event, spread out in sessions over two weeks, was co-sponsored by the Center for Renaissance...
From: The Recipes Project on 19 Nov 2020

A root “that our French call rosary”: Foodways in Indigenous and French North America

Renée Girard In early modern France, foraging practices were associated with a ‘primitive’ style of food procurement, with times of dearth, and with poverty. God had given nature to his children for them to control, and agriculture...
From: Borealia on 9 Nov 2020

Distilling Women

Distillation became an important household activity for many women in early modern Europe in the seventeenth century; we have ample evidence that they wrote, purchased, collected, annotated, and shared recipes for medicinal, hygienic, and sweet-smelling...
From: streets of salem on 17 Oct 2020

A Salem Menu

Food history is not necessarily women’s history, but I’ve been reading and writing about Elizabethan recipes over the past month and I’m tired of men stealing the show. The most prominent authors in my sources, John Partridge,...
From: streets of salem on 10 Oct 2020

Exploring Benjamin Lincoln’s Life in Hingham

This afternoon the Hingham Historical Society launches its new season of lectures with the theme “Benjamin Lincoln’s World: Stories from Colonial Hingham to the Early Republic.”The society is in the process of acquiring Gen. Benjamin...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Sep 2020

High Tea and Afternoon Tea in the Age of Austen

Inquiring readers, I once enjoyed afternoon tea in Fortnum and Mason’s in London. It was an exquisite, elaborate, and unforgettable experience. It was so elegant that I thought of it as high tea, but the presentation and its intent had nothing in...
From: Jane Austen's World on 22 Sep 2020

Joseph Plumb Martin’s Hunger Games

Not all primary sources are created equal. We venerate the Lives of the Twelve Caesars by Suetonius for providing us with a contemporary history... The post Joseph Plumb Martin’s Hunger Games appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

“Poor are the Boston-Poor indeed”

In May 1774, Gen. Thomas Gage arrived in Boston with the news that he was the new royal governor and that Parliament had ordered the port closed to most shipping. Anticipating increased unemployment, the town of Boston began what we’d call public-works...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Sep 2020

Two letters about cheese

Around six letters sent to Agnes Leslie, Lady Lochleven survive, four in the National Library of Scotland and two in the National Records of Scotland. Two letters are about cheese: cheese bought in Stirling by her agent Alexander Bruce, and cheese gifted...
From: Objects and the archive on 28 Aug 2020

Advice from an Edinburgh apothecary, 1568

Advice for a patient with gonorrhoea sent by Thomas Davidson, an apothecary in Edinburgh, 24 March 1568. This letter was probably sent to William Douglas, Laird of Lochleven. Davidson died in 1574 and his registered will includes a full inventory of his...
From: Objects and the archive on 27 Aug 2020

“Material Culture of Sugar” Webinar from Historic Deerfield, 26 Sept.

Way back in April, Historic Deerfield was going to host a one-day forum on sugar in early New England culture. But then people recognized the Covid-19 virus had started to spread in this country, and institutions postponed their public events for a few...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Aug 2020

Revisiting Carla Cevasco’s “Look’d Like Milk”: Breastmilk Substitutes in New England’s Borderlands

Welcome to the August 2020 Edition of the Recipes Project, which examines the intersections of race, medicine, sexuality, and gender in recipes. Today we re-join Carla Cevasco’s 2015 post on the (sometimes shared) breastfeeding practices of Indigenous...
From: The Recipes Project on 13 Aug 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.