The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Food & Lifestyle"

Your search for posts with tags containing Food & Lifestyle found 17 posts

Tea in 18th Century America

Tea in 18th Century America by Kimberly K. Walters. (K. Walters at the Sign of the Gray Horse, 2019) Best-selling author Lucinda Brant offers enthusiastic... The post Tea in 18th Century America appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

This Week on Dispatches: Don N. Hagist on Martha Bradley and Eighteenth-Century Cookery

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews historian and managing editor of the Journal of the American Revolution, Don N. Hagist, about the fascinating... The post This Week on Dispatches: Don N. Hagist on Martha Bradley and Eighteenth-Century...

Thanksgiving: A Week with Martha Bradley, The British Housewife, Day 5

Martha Bradley lived in an age when a prosperous household often brewed its own beer, culturing and storing it in large wooden vessels in... The post Thanksgiving: A Week with Martha Bradley, <i>The British Housewife</i>, Day 5 appeared first...

Happy Thanksgiving! Our week with Martha Bradley, Day 4

In her recipes for November, Martha Bradley included only three for “Confectionary,” all of them jellies or custards. Her pies were savory, and her... The post Happy Thanksgiving! Our week with Martha Bradley, Day 4 appeared first on Journal...

Thanksgiving: A Week with Martha Bradley, The British Housewife, Day 3

To accompany our roast, Martha Bradley in her 1756 work The British Housewife: or, the Cook, Housekeeper’s, and Gardiner’s Companion included recipes for stews, savory... The post Thanksgiving: A Week with Martha Bradley, <i>The...

Thanksgiving: A Week with Martha Bradley, The British Housewife, Day

Yesterday, Martha Bradley, in her 1756 publication The British Housewife: or, the Cook, Housekeeper’s, and Gardiner’s Companion, explained to us the various poultry available in... The post Thanksgiving: A Week with Martha Bradley, <i>The...

Thanksgiving: A Week of Martha Bradley, The British Housewife

Autumn is when many North Americans celebrate Thanksgiving, a tradition that dates back to the Reformation in England in the sixteenth century. Journal of... The post Thanksgiving: A Week of Martha Bradley, <i>The British Housewife</i> appeared...

Thomas Jefferson: Life, Liberty, and French Fries

Thomas Jefferson and Julia Child. Not two people you’d expect to be linked in history. But yet, indeed they are—as two gourmets who loved... The post Thomas Jefferson: Life, Liberty, and French Fries appeared first on Journal of the American...

Fire-Hunting by Night in South Carolina: A Pursuit of British Officers

While George Hanger was for a time in limbo, waiting in mid May 1780 for a decision on his part in the British arrangements for... The post Fire-Hunting by Night in South Carolina: A Pursuit of British Officers appeared first on Journal of the American...

A Week of Martha Washington’s Pies, Day 4 (of 4)

Everyone loves pie, everyone loves Martha Washington, and everyone loves… well, two out of three will have to do. But if you do love... The post A Week of Martha Washington’s Pies, Day 4 (of 4) appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

A Week of Martha Washington’s Pies, Day 3

Wool production was critical to the early American economy, and if there were sheep in the fields there were bound to be sheep dishes... The post A Week of Martha Washington’s Pies, Day 3 appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

A Week of Martha Washington’s Pies, Day 2 (of 4)

We’ve all heard the expression, “eat humble pie.” It’s used at a metaphor, but humble pie was a real thing and Martha Washington had... The post A Week of Martha Washington’s Pies, Day 2 (of 4) appeared first on Journal of...

A Week of Martha Washington’s Pies, Day 1 (of 4)

Pie is a perennial favorite at Thanksgiving, and the more varieties the better. Pie was also an eighteenth century staple, with far more types... The post A Week of Martha Washington’s Pies, Day 1 (of 4) appeared first on Journal of the American...

The French Bread Connection

It was the letter that forced Washington to give up his dream of recapturing New York. Gen. Jean-Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, comte de Rochambeau,... The post The French Bread Connection appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

A Republic of Wool: Founding Era Americans’ Grand Plans for Sheep

Only 1,457 pounds of wool? George Washington was astonished. He had 568 sheep, so that meant the recent shearing at Mount Vernon and his... The post A Republic of Wool: Founding Era Americans’ Grand Plans for Sheep appeared first on Journal of the...

Drunk and Disorderly: The Dreadful Havoc of Spirituous Liquors

Drink does not drown care, but waters it, and makes it grow faster.[1] Valley Forge.  For most Americans, the very name of the Pennsylvania... The post Drunk and Disorderly: The Dreadful Havoc of Spirituous Liquors appeared first on Journal of the...

The Truth About George Washington and Hemp

Did George Washington grow hemp? Yes. Hemp was a well-known, multi-purpose crop. Did George Washington smoke hemp? There’s absolutely zero evidence that he grew... The post The Truth About George Washington and Hemp appeared first on Journal of...

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.