The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Fortune"

Showing 1 - 20 of 32

Your search for posts with tags containing Fortune found 32 posts

13 April, 1597 - Time's Triumph and Fortune's

Here's what the Admiral's Men performed at the Rose playhouse on this day, 424 years ago... Henslowe writes: 13 | tt at times triumpe and fortus | 01| 05In modern English: 13th [April, 1597] | total at Time's Triumph and Fortune's | £1 and...
From: Henslowe's Diary ... as a Blog! on 13 Apr 2021

Lack of Foresight – Fortune Telling

We have previously written about fortune telling, a matter which was very popular during the Georgian era, so today we have a couple of short stories to share with you on the subject. In April 1801 John Rowe was indicted for defrauding Sarah Hall of the...
From: All Things Georgian on 19 Nov 2019

Introducing Capt. Samuel Dashwood

The merchant captain Samuel Dashwood is one of the more dramatic characters in Revolutionary Boston, with a name out of an eighteenth-century novel to match his behavior. I’m a little surprised I’ve never mentioned him before, but I’m...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Feb 2019

Experiencing the History of Emotions

Catherine-Rose Hailstone is a PhD Candidate in the Department of History at the University of York, UK. She recently spent June 2018 with CHE (UWA) working with Professor Andrew Lynch on an Employability Project (REP), which was required and funded by...
From: Histories of Emotion on 13 Jul 2018

Atlantic Families, Race, and Empire

Children of Uncertain Fortune: Mixed-Race Jamaicans in Britain and the Atlantic Family, 1733-1833. By Daniel Livesay. Chapel Hill, N.C.: University of North Carolina Press published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, 2018....
From: The Junto on 19 Apr 2018

A brief history of coffee in the Georgian era

Oxford holds the distinction of being the location of the first coffee-house in England; an establishment trading under the sign of the Angel was opened in 1650, acting as a centre for gossip, news and academic discussions in equal measure. Coffee-houses...
From: All Things Georgian on 12 Apr 2018

Losing the Plot: Audiences, Scraps of Performance, and Selective Participation

Further to Andy’s post on story, this post asks questions about the nature and necessity of coherent “story”—and of audiences following “plot”—in early modern commercial dramatic performance. It only aims to float...
From: Before Shakespeare on 6 Apr 2018

Pirate Events Calendar.

Gentlemen Of Fortune group USA.http://www.cindyvallar.com/pirates.html#events
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 20 Jan 2018

Banishment as a Romance Convention in Early English Drama (c. 1581-1591)

We’re very pleased to host this guest post from Alexander Thom exploring the trope of banishment in early commercial drama. *** Regarding Shakespeare, James Joyce once wrote, “the note of banishment, banishment from the heart, banishment from...
From: Before Shakespeare on 19 Jan 2018

Venus’s Palaces

She’s got it,Yeah baby, she’s got it—Shocking Blue For 1570s and 1580s theatregoers, love was all around. One of the defining characteristics of the earliest surviving commercial plays is the predominance of the character Venus or her...
From: Before Shakespeare on 4 Oct 2017

A summer reading selection: green men, sovereigns, moles and bawds

We are taking our annual summer holiday from blogging and so this will be our last post until September when we will be back with plenty of new posts and some exciting news (we have a teaser for you at the end of this blog!). In the meantime though, we...
From: All Things Georgian on 27 Jul 2017

July 11

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Providence Gazette (July 11, 1767).“They have been unjustly detained out of a Sum of Money, greatly to their Disadvantage.” No publicity is bad publicity. That may have...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 11 Jul 2017

Two City Stories: Mawdlen Gawen and Mrs Moodey

they procured her to be rescued by the way as she went thither And the time appointed, she changed herself into man’s Apparel, which she had in her said Master’s house, being about two of the clock after Midnight, and came away, and so came...
From: Before Shakespeare on 26 May 2017

When Two Tribes go to…Conferences

To start with this week, some long-awaited and exciting news – The Rage of Fortune, the prequel to the Quinton series, has just been published as an e-book by Endeavour Press, and is available from the various Amazon Kindle stores! I’ve...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 24 Apr 2017

Fortune-Telling using Moles

Yes, this is folklore, unless anyone can confirm otherwise, and no, we are not talking about the small furry creature kind of moles! These are often referred to as birth marks or beauty marks and judging back the lack of images we have been able to find...
From: All Things Georgian on 16 Mar 2017

Mrs Bridget the Norwood Gipsey

We came across a book written in 1790 entitled The Universal Fortune Teller and concerning a gypsy, Mother Bridget of Norwood, one of the infamous Norwood gypsies who died in 1768. The Norwood gypsies lived in the area now known as Gypsy Hill. The...
From: All Things Georgian on 12 Jan 2017

Merry Christmas from the Raging Quintons!

For the final post on this site in 2016 – and wasn’t that just the most nondescript year ever? – I thought I’d provide a Christmas treat for all loyal readers of both this blog and my books. I mentioned recently that Endeavour...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 19 Dec 2016

A New Era

At long last, after having to keep things under wraps for some time, I’m finally able to reveal some really exciting news! Firstly, great news for all Quinton fans – the series continues! Next year, the 350th anniversary of the Dutch attack...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 5 Dec 2016

Review: “Measure for Measure – Ireland 1916” at Dublin Castle

Review essay by Edel Semple The conjunction this year of the centenary of the Easter Rising and the quadricentenary of Shakespeare’s death have proved fertile ground for arts, culture, and scholarship across the island of Ireland and further afield....
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 11 Aug 2016

Theatre: Measure for Measure by Fortune’s Fool Productions in Dublin

Measure for Measure is currently showing in Dublin with free entry. More details from the production company: Measure for Measure – Ireland 1916 Measure for Measure – Ireland 1916 sponsored by the  British Council, as part of...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 9 Aug 2016

Page 1 of 212Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.