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Search Results for "French Literature"

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Your search for posts with tags containing French Literature found 22 posts

Victor Hugo’s Early Modern Outlaw Play: “Hernani” (1830)

Stephen Basdeo is a historian and lecturer based in Leeds, UK. He researches the life and works of several British and French ‘mysteries’ authors including George W.M. Reynolds, Pierce Egan the Younger, Eugene Sue, and Victor Hugo. He is also currently...

On the Democracy of the United States and the Bourgeoisie of France (1838) | G. W. M. Reynolds

The following review of two works published in French, one by the famous Alexis de Tocqueville and the other by M. Michel Chevalier, was written in 1838 by G.W.M. Reynolds. La Democratie en Amerique. Par M. de Tocqueville. Lettres sur l’Amerique...

The Early Works of Eugene Sue | G. W. M. Reynolds

Eugene Sue (1804–57) was one of the most popular novelists in nineteenth-century France and he certainly caught the attention of one young aspiring writer who was living in France during the 1830s. This writer was George W.M. Reynolds (1814–79). Although...

De Balzac’s Works | G. W. M. Reynolds

Honoré de Balzac was one of the most popular novelists in nineteenth-century France and he certainly caught the attention of one young aspiring writer who was living in France during the 1830s. This writer was George W.M. Reynolds (1814–79). Although...

Outside the Ballroom

(“Ainsi l’Hôtel de Ville illumine.”)[1] {VI., May, 1833.} By Victor Hugo Behold the ball-room flashing on the sight, From step to cornice one grand glare of light; The noise of mirth and revelry resounds, Like fairy melody on...

Napoleon the Second: An Ode

Translated from the French of Victor Hugo by G.W.M. Reynolds in The Monthly Magazine (1837) I. A quarter of a century has gone, Since Gallia welcom’d her Napoleon’s son; The heav’n was low’ring on th’ expectant earth, Before th’...

“Mysteries of the People” (1848): Eugene Sue’s Epic Socialist Novel

By Stephen Basdeo In 1848 the master of the “mysteries” novels, Eugene Sue, began the weekly serialisation of a new novel: Mysteries of the People. It was a chronicle of a proletarian family, and their descendants, who participated in all...

Addressing the Absent Reader: the Dedicatory Epistles of Louis-Antoine Caraccioli

by Rebecca Short (University of Oxford) When Louis-Antoine Caraccioli (1719-1802) came onto the French literary scene in the mid-eighteenth century, he made waves almost instantaneously. The author was, at least initially, an anti-philosophe: religious...

Blind Justice in Eugene Sue’s “The Mysteries of Paris” (1842–3)

By Stephen Basdeo In the 19 June 1842, issue of the Parisian magazine, Journal des Debats, a new serialised novel appeared entitled The Mysteries of Paris, which ran weekly until 15 October 1843. The novel was written by Eugene Sue (1804-57),...

Victor Hugo’s “The Last Day of a Condemned Man” (1829)

Last week Google celebrated the life of Victor Hugo (1802-85) with some quirky illustrations on its masthead, so I thought I would do the same by writing a post on an early novel by Hugo entitled The Last Day of a Condemned Man (1829). Two of the cartoons...

Printers ornaments featuring animals: cat asleep among...

Printers ornaments featuring animals: cat asleep among vegetables, owl defying the stormy seashore, monkey chained to an olive branch (these are all very weird, now that I look at them in a group). They are from Fables nouvelles, by Claude Joseph...

Putti playing with soap bubbles, a printer’s ornament in a book...

Putti playing with soap bubbles, a printer’s ornament in a book of fables. Fables nouvelles, by Claude Joseph Dorat (1734-80) (Paris: Delalain, 1773). Photographer Dr. Emily West, in the McMaster University archives. Read Eighteenth-Century Fiction...

Three illustrations from Fables nouvelles, by Claude Joseph...

Three illustrations from Fables nouvelles, by Claude Joseph Dorat (1734-80) (Paris: Delalain, 1773): Fable 7, Le Tonnere et les grenouilles (C.P. Marillier and Y le Gouaz, sculpt), p. 25; Fable 18, L’Autruche (C.P. Marillier and L.J....

Scenes from Faits memorables des empereurs de la Chine: Tirés...

Scenes from Faits memorables des empereurs de la Chine: Tirés des annales chinoises, par Attiret, Jean Denis, 1702-1768, et Helman, Isidore Stanislas, 1743-1806(?) (Paris, 1788). Photographer Emily West.  Do feel free to use any original...

Killing an Arab, finding an Arab: Rewriting Camus’ L’Étranger

Ask most people to name the best-known French novel of the twentieth century, and they’d almost certainly come up with Albert Camus’s L’Étranger. Camus was born in Algeria in 1913 and moved to France in 1940, but as his greatest novels L’Étranger...
From: Parthenissa on 22 Mar 2015

I might be a little hesitant to be wooed by this fellow who is...

I might be a little hesitant to be wooed by this fellow who is clearly kneeling on my dog! And I really don’t understand what the artist/engraver was thinking with the poor guy’s fingers on his left hand: spindly much? This is a cropped engraving...

A cheese-making enterprise from the book: Le Nouveau theatre...

A cheese-making enterprise from the book: Le Nouveau theatre d’agriculture et menage des champs, contenant la maniere de cultiver & faire valoir toutes sortes de biens à la champagne by Louis Liger (1658-1717) (Paris: Damien Beugnie, 1723). The...

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Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

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The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

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This is the basic structure:

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I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.