The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Friendship"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Friendship found 54 posts

Pinnace in Port

The highlight of this year’s annual Salem Maritime Festival, hosted by the Salem Maritime National Historic Site, was the Kalmar Nyckel, a reproduction seventeenth-century full-rigged pinnace built by the state of Delaware as a tribute to the...
From: streets of salem on 5 Aug 2019

Food and Friendship in Early Virginia

The final post in the Roundtable on Food and Hunger in Vast Early America is by Rachel Winchcombe, a cultural historian of early modern England and America. She joined the University of Manchester in September 2017 as a Lecturer in Early Modern History....
From: The Junto on 20 Jun 2019

” we both of us haveing been talking and wishing for you”

A newsy letter from ABIGAIL ADAMS to her sister MARY CRANCH in Salem. Abigail has one child, a daughter Nabby, and Mary has a daughter Betsy. Happy to be home after a visit to Weymouth Abigail is feeling a little “lonesome” even though she...
From: In the Words of Women on 15 May 2019

The Friendship Returns

Yesterday the reproduction East Indiaman Friendship of Salem returned to Salem Harbor after an absence of nearly three years after she was hauled-out in the summer of 2016 for what proved to be substantial repairs. Everyone was very...
From: streets of salem on 23 Apr 2019

“I am apt to love every body that loves you”

POLLY STEVENSON must have written Benjamin Franklin asking his advice on whether she should accept the proposal of marriage from the surgeon William Hewson for he responded on May 31, 1770: . . . . I am sure you are a much better Judge in this Affair...
From: In the Words of Women on 19 Mar 2019

“Yɨi have transkrɥib’d iur Alfabet”

Amazingly, the clever MARY “POLLY” STEVENSON (later HEWSON) responded to Benjamin Franklin’s letter using the very same phonetic alphabet in which he had written to her! Franklin had been guiding the education of Polly, the daughter...
From: In the Words of Women on 9 Mar 2019

“Yɨi uis̸ iu to kaansider dhis Alfabet”

Benjamin Franklin, as many before him, was interested in creating a system of phonetic spelling and he sent MARY “POLLY” STEVENSON (later HEWSON) a letter (July 20, 1768) using what he proposed. The “translation” follows. Diir...
From: In the Words of Women on 4 Mar 2019

“a mere chit chat letter”

The engraving of Benjamin Franklin is by Edward Fisher after Mason Chamberlin’s 1762 portrait; it was created while Franklin was living in London. (National Portrait Gallery NPG.70.66.) In November 1762 Benjamin Franklin left England for America....
From: In the Words of Women on 3 Mar 2019

“the Improvement of my Mind”

MARY “POLLY” STEVENSON (later HEWSON) and Benjamin Franklin continued to correspond with each other when time and circumstances allowed, she at Wanstead and he at Craven Street or abroad. Many of the topics discussed had to do with science,...
From: In the Words of Women on 20 Feb 2019

“What signifies Philosophy that does not apply to some Use? “

In the previous post Benjamin Franklin promised MARY “POLLY” STEVENSON (later HEWSON), the daughter of his London landlady whose education he had taken in hand, another letter on the subject of tides and rivers. He was true to his word. His...
From: In the Words of Women on 11 Feb 2019

“a Mind thirsty after Knowledge”

Benjamin Franklin, continuing his mission to provide his London landlady’s young daughter MARY “POLLY” STEVENSON (later HEWSON) instruction in science and philosophy wrote a long letter on 13 September 1760 about tides and rivers. It...
From: In the Words of Women on 6 Feb 2019

“thank you my dear Preceptor”

MARY “POLLY” STEVENSON was grateful for the long letter Benjamin Franklin wrote her justifying the study of insects as part of her education. Wanstead, where Polly was caring for an aunt, was not very far from Franklin’s lodgings on...
From: In the Words of Women on 28 Jan 2019

Your Observation … concerning Insects, is … just and solid.

The letters between MARY “POLLY” STEVENSON and Benjamin Franklin are so interesting and charming I have decided to include Franklin’s letters as well as Polly’s as they form a personal conversation providing a window into the life...
From: In the Words of Women on 23 Jan 2019

“highly pleas’d with the discription of Insects”

Benjamin Franklin apparently visited POLLY STEVENSON at Wanstead (“last Friday”) as she refers to it in the following letter—June 6, 1760. Don’t you love her curiosity about the barometer which prompts her to ask Franklin for an...
From: In the Words of Women on 17 Jan 2019

“have a good Dictionary at hand”

Recall in the previous post that Benjamin Franklin sent POLLY STEVENSON some books that he thought would further her education. His advice to Polly on how to approach them so as to best profit from the reading are those of an experienced reader and teacher....
From: In the Words of Women on 15 Jan 2019

” . . . read some Books”

In a letter to POLLY STEVENSON in February 1760 Benjamin Franklin expresses his thanks for her New Year’s greeting: “I receiv’d your kind Congratulations on occasion of the new Year; and though you had not mine in writing, be assured...
From: In the Words of Women on 10 Jan 2019

“Your kind Remembrance of me . . . “

Benjamin Franklin, that amazing polymath—printer, author, publisher, inventor, scientist, philosopher, and diplomat—was sent to London in 1757 by the Pennsylvania Assembly to protest the influence of the Penn family in the state. Subsequently...
From: In the Words of Women on 6 Jan 2019

The Philadelphia Jewess

Fourteen young Tory ladies were selected by Major John André as the “foremost in youth, beauty and fashion” in Philadelphia to participate in the Meschianza in May of 1778, a tribute to retiring General William Howe. Among them was...
From: In the Words of Women on 15 Dec 2018

“A lock of the General’s hair”

On February 22, just in time for George Washington’s birthday, an article in the newspaper announced that an archivist at Union College (Schenectady, NY) library had found an uncatalogued volume, its brown pages frayed, on the shelves. A ho-hum...
From: In the Words of Women on 12 Mar 2018

George Washington: “one of my best Friends and Favorites”

ELIZABETH WILLING POWEL was a renowned hostess and the Powel home on Third Street in central Philadelphia was the gathering place for important political and social figures of Revolutionary America and the early republic. Elizabeth and her husband were...
From: In the Words of Women on 24 Aug 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.