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Search Results for "Gainsborough"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Gainsborough found 41 posts

How the portrait of Grace Dalrymple Elliott came to be in The Frick Collection

The information about the painting shown on the Frick Collection website provides a few clues about the provenance of the portrait, but we came across more which fills in some of the gaps. Grace Dalrymple Elliott by Thomas Gainsborough. The Frick, New...
From: All Things Georgian on 5 Dec 2019

Remembering Garrick’s Jubilee in Stratford-upon-Avon

The statue of Shakespeare donated by David Garrick Imagine the scene in Stratford-upon-Avon on Saturday 9 September 1769, the morning after the night before, indeed after the three days of David Garrick’s Jubilee. There was an undignified rush to...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 10 Sep 2019

A Right Royal Face Off by Simon Edge

We are delighted to welcome the author, Simon Edge, journalist, critic and novelist, to our blog to tell us more about the challenges he face when writing his latest novel, due to be released in a few days time, A Right Royal Face Off: A Georgian Entertainment...
From: All Things Georgian on 4 Jul 2019

Art Detectives: Thomas Gainsborough’s red-headed beauty

In our latest book, which is based on our blog and titled All Things Georgian: Tales from the Long Eighteenth-Century, one of the 25 true tales within tells of the life of the red-headed actress, Elizabeth Hartley. Elizabeth was a beauty, but not particularly...
From: All Things Georgian on 25 Apr 2019

Art Detectives: William Hornby of Hornby’s Bank in Gainsborough

I’ve long been intrigued by a portrait on the Art UK website of a rather dishevelled and – quite frankly – eccentric figure, which, so the label claims, depicts William Hornby (incorrectly labelled as Hornsby) of Hornby’s Bank...
From: All Things Georgian on 27 Nov 2018

Imagining History: A Review of The Hall of Fame Exhibition at Gainsborough Old Hall

Time is out of joint at Gainsborough Old Hall, just as it is at antiquated piles across the land. It is a strange kind of tourism, when you think about it.  At most of these venues you’re encouraged to shake off the trappings of your own...

We fly by night on ‘the wings of love’… to Hull

Around midnight, or just shortly thereafter, Miss Mary Burton crept out of her father’s house at Gainsborough in Lincolnshire, into the waiting arms of her lover, William Fields, a draper from Hull in the East Riding of Yorkshire. William must have...
From: All Things Georgian on 24 Apr 2018

A chance discovery or a red herring: is this another portrait of Grace Dalrymple Elliott?

The earliest known portrait of the infamous eighteenth-century courtesan, Grace Dalrymple Elliott is a miniature painted by Richard Cosway around the time of her marriage to Dr (later Sir) John Eliot. It can be viewed on the cover of our biography of...
From: All Things Georgian on 18 Jul 2017

Sarah Trimmer née Kirby (1741-1810), author, critic and educational reformer

Sarah Trimmer née Kirby, author, critic and religious and educational reformer, was born in 1741 at Ipswich, the only daughter of the Suffolk landscape painter Joshua Kirby (a close friend of Thomas Gainsborough) and his wife Sarah née Bell....
From: All Things Georgian on 11 Jul 2017

Henry E. Huntington, the Greatest Book Collector

In “Why America buys England’s books,” a 1927 article in the Atlantic Monthly, Philadelphia bookseller Rosenbach wrote that Henry E. Huntington was the “greatest collector of books the world has ever known.” The London Times...
From: Blogging Shakespeare on 28 Mar 2017

Looking and Listening to Gainsborough House

Gainsborough House in Sudbury, Suffolk, England, is the late-medieval brick house where the painter Thomas Gainsborough was born in 1727. It’s now a museum dedicated to the painter and his work. The house recently announced that its collection of...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Jul 2016

A closer look at Thomas Gainsborough’s full-length portrait of Grace Dalrymple Elliott

Our biography of the eighteenth-century courtesan Grace Dalrymple Elliott, which tells her story more completely than ever before, shedding light on her siblings and maternal family who were central to her experiences, is out this month in the UK in hardback....
From: All Things Georgian on 21 Jan 2016

Does this chalk drawing depict Grace Dalrymple Elliott?

Unidentified lady, thought to be Grace Dalrymple Elliott by John Hoppner, British Museum.A chalk drawing dating to around 1782 by John Hoppner, whilst unproven, is reputed to depict the celebrated courtesan Grace Dalrymple Elliott.  If there is a...
From: All Things Georgian on 7 Jan 2016

Dinner at the Hospital

The Foundling Hospital played an important role in the developing community of artists in London in the 1740s and 1750s. Hogarth was the principal force behind this.  Back in 1740, Hogarth had donated his portrait of Captain Coram to the hospital, and...
From: Kirby and his world on 19 Mar 2015

centuries-and-continents: Thomas Gainsborough c. 1785 Study of...

centuries-and-continents: Thomas Gainsborough c. 1785 Study of a Lady

St. Anne’s, Kew

The church of St. Anne on Kew Green was dedicated in 1714, having been built on land donated by Queen Anne, and is celebrating its tercentenary in 2014. Over the course of the three centuries, the church has been enlarged, renovated and altered numerous...
From: Kirby and his world on 20 Apr 2014

Bishop Hurd's domestic problems

When Richard Hurd was promoted from his living at Thurcaston to be Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry in December 1774 he realised some servants would be required. He had some at Thurcaston of course, including a maid who was a good cook and once sent his...
From: The Hurd Library on 5 Jan 2014

More Kirby Live!

I am giving a talk at the upcoming conference of the Northeast American Society for Eighteenth Century Studies annual conference at Yale University on October 4. A substantial number of Thomas Gainsborough’s early portrait sitters in Suffolk were...
From: Kirby and his world on 16 Sep 2013

Eighteenth Century Aphorisms

I like this quote from Gainsborough’s friend William Jackson of Exeter. Jackson (1730-1803) was the organist at Exeter Cathedral and late in life published a book called The Four Ages, which also included essays on various subjects, including one...
From: Kirby and his world on 11 Sep 2013

John Kirby

Joshua Kirby was one of a dozen children of John Kirby (c. 1690 – 1753) and Alice (Brown) Kirby (ca. 1685—1766). Not much is known about Kirby’s father’s background. He is supposed to have been a schoolmaster at some point, and when Kirby...
From: Kirby and his world on 25 Jul 2013

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.