The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Galen"

Showing 1 - 20 of 46

Your search for posts with tags containing Galen found 46 posts

The Paracelsans

Image of ParacelsusIn the late sixteenth century, the writings of an obscure physician started to become very popular around Europe. Born in 1493 with the name of Theophrastus von Hohenheim, "Paracelsus"[1] was the son of a German physician living...
From: Conciatore on 26 Jun 2019

Tales from the Archives: Lizards and Lettuces: Greek and Roman Recipes for Valentine’s Day

The Recipes Project is now six years old, and that means we host a lot of content! We now have over 700 posts in our archives. (And thank you to our contributors for sharing such a wealth of knowledge on recipes). But with so much material on the...
From: The Recipes Project on 14 Feb 2019

A Deeper Accomplishment

From Antonio Neri, "Treasure of the World"MS Ferguson 67, f. 22r.For the past four centuries, Antonio Neri has been best known as the author of L'Arte Vetraria, the first printed book solely devoted to the art of glass formulation. It is a work committed...
From: Conciatore on 6 Feb 2019

Scraping the Barrel

4th century BCE philosopher Diogenes(supposedly lived in a wine barrel)by Gaetano Gandolfi (1792)To seventeenth century glassmaker Antonio Neri, "tartar" was a well-known byproduct of the winemaking process. If we chill wine or grape juice to below 50...
From: Conciatore on 21 Jan 2019

Thanksgiving with Galen and Apicius

By Sean Coughlin For Thanksgiving, I thought I’d come up with a new English translation of a seasonal recipe from the Roman cook-book of Apicius. It comes from the third book of De re coquinaria. The Latin is cucurbitas cum gallina. In Joseph Vehling’s...
From: The Recipes Project on 21 Nov 2018

Tales from the archives: the torture of therapeutics in Rome: Galen on pigeon dung

Recently, I have noticed fewer pigeons at Cardiff station. This probably mean that there has been a cull, which even though I’m no fan of pigeons, made me feel rather melancholy. So, in honour of the humble pigeon, here is, fresh from our archives,...
From: The Recipes Project on 6 Nov 2018

The Paracelsans

Image of ParacelsusIn the late sixteenth century, the writings of an obscure physician started to become very popular around Europe. Born in 1493 with the name of Theophrastus von Hohenheim, "Paracelsus"[1] was the son of a German physician living...
From: Conciatore on 10 Sep 2018

Harnessing Heat in Greco-Roman and Islamicate Medicine

By Aileen R Das Associated and sometimes identified with the life-giving (or vital) principle, heat occupied a central place in ancient Greek, and subsequently Roman and medieval Islamicate, theories about the human body and its care. The medical literature...
From: The Recipes Project on 2 Aug 2018

A Deeper Accomplishment

From Antonio Neri, "Treasure of the World"MS Ferguson 67, f. 22r.For the past four centuries, Antonio Neri has been best known as the author of L'Arte Vetraria, the first printed book solely devoted to the art of glass formulation. It is a work committed...
From: Conciatore on 4 May 2018

Scraping the Barrel

4th century BCE philosopher Diogenes(supposedly lived in a wine barrel)by Gaetano Gandolfi (1792)To seventeenth century glassmaker Antonio Neri, "tartar" was a well-known byproduct of the winemaking process. If we chill wine or grape juice to below 50...
From: Conciatore on 18 Apr 2018

The Paracelsans

Image of Paracelsus In the late sixteenth century, the writings of an obscure physician started to become very popular around Europe. Born in 1493 with the name of Theophrastus von Hohenheim, "Paracelsus"[1] was the son of a German physician living...
From: Conciatore on 25 Oct 2017

The Live Chicken Treatment for Buboes: Trying a Plague Cure in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

By Erik Heinrichs  While researching German plague treatises I became fascinated by one odd treatment for buboes that appeared again and again, despite sounding so far-fetched. One sixteenth-century version calls for plucking the feathers from around...
From: The Recipes Project on 31 Aug 2017

A Deeper Accomplishment

From Antonio Neri, "Treasure of the World" MS Ferguson 67, f. 22r. For the past four centuries, Antonio Neri has been best known as the author of L'Arte Vetraria, the first printed book solely devoted to the art of glass formulation. It is a work...
From: Conciatore on 22 May 2017

The Fruits of Summer in the Dead of Winter

Molly Taylor-Poleskey In the seventeenth century, life ebbed and flowed with the seasons. In my research into the court household of Berlin, I noted seasonal shifts in livery, lighting, bedtimes, and, of course, recipes. Even with these seasonal adaptations,...
From: The Recipes Project on 9 May 2017

Scraping the Barrel

4th century BCE philosopher Diogenes (supposedly lived in a wine barrel) by Gaetano Gandolfi (1792) To seventeenth century glassmaker Antonio Neri, "tartar" was a well-known byproduct of the winemaking process. If we chill wine or grape juice to below...
From: Conciatore on 5 May 2017

Burnt Toasts, Medicine and Identity in (Early Modern?) England

by Giovanni Pozzetti Last Monday the Food Standards Agency (FSA) in the UK launched the ‘go for gold’ campaign to promote awareness in the kitchen when cooking foods at high temperatures. Results of a study conducted on mice showed how foods...
From: The Recipes Project on 2 Feb 2017

MOOCing about with Ancient Recipes

A while  ago, Professor Helen King (Open University) offered Dr Patty Baker (University of Kent) and  me the opportunity to be involved in an exciting project: a MOOC (Massive Online Open Course) on the topic of Health and Wellbeing in...
From: The Recipes Project on 29 Nov 2016

The Paracelsans

Image of Paracelsus. In the late sixteenth century, the writings of an obscure physician started to become very popular around Europe. Born in 1493 with the name of Theophrastus von Hohenheim, "Paracelsus"[1] was the son of a German physician living...
From: Conciatore on 9 Nov 2016

Astrophil and Stella, Sonnet 1

Where be those roses gone, which sweetened so our eyes? Where those red cheeks, which oft with fair increase did frame The height of honour in the kindly badge of shame? Who hath the crimson weeds stol’n from my morning skies?...
From: Blogging Sidney's Sonnets on 25 May 2016

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