The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Garden"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Garden found 277 posts

A Georgian Trip Advisor – Part One

When we’re looking for somewhere to dine out, we often use a website, such as Trip Advisor (others available, of course), but did you know that something similar existed in the 18th century? Well, today’s guest, who I am delighted to welcome, is historian...
From: All Things Georgian on 23 May 2022

Lilac Days

Lilacs are so ubiquitous in New England in May that you tend to overlook them, but over the past pleasant days I have been seeking them out in some of my favorite spots. I’m always so conflicted during this month, as my academic responsiblities conflict...
From: streets of salem on 18 May 2022

Selling Seeds

A rather fluffy post on seed packets for this week: it’s grading time! This combination of gardening + paper, two of my favorite things, is irresistable to me at all times, but I have also noticed a trend over the last decade or so. I was thinking about...
From: streets of salem on 13 May 2022

Skirting Witches and Pirates in Salem

Walking is my preferred form of transportation in Salem, but I tread carefully: I want my path to be lined with beautiful old houses, colorful shops and lovely green (or white) spaces. Attractions exploiting the terrible tragedy of 1692 and out-of-town-yet-territorial...
From: streets of salem on 3 May 2022

Steventon Rectory Garden: Imagining the Landscape of Jane Austen’s Youth

When visiting Jane Austen’s England today, you can stroll through the gardens at Chawton House and Jane Austen’s House Museum, explore the churches at Steventon and Chawton, and tour the homes and churches where Jane Austen and her relatives lived...
From: Jane Austen's World on 11 Apr 2022

Morning

An old woman, the prude, is standing near a crowd of people huddled around a bonfire in Covent Garden. She is crossing Covent Garden Piazza, disapproving of the amorous scenes outside the notorious Tom King’s Coffee House. The print shows the morning...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 25 Mar 2022

He and his drunken companions raise a riot in Covent Garden

“Plate from a pirated series of Hogarth’s Rake’s Progress, not based on one of the original prints: Covent Garden with St Paul’s church and the buildings at the north-western corner of the piazza; the Rake (here called Ramble) and drunken friends...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 18 Mar 2022

Comfort in Jane Austen

When the world is topsy-turvy and my heart is heavy, I find comfort in the beauty of Austen’s novels, in the richness of the movie adaptations, and even in the thought of the lovely Hampshire countryside, secluded and beautiful, tucked away and secure....
From: Jane Austen's World on 15 Mar 2022

February 26

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “A fresh Assortment of Garden Seeds.” It was a sign that spring was approaching.  The first advertisement for a “fresh Assortment of Garden Seeds” than ran in the Boston...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 26 Feb 2022

Acting magistrates committing themselves being their first appearance

“The stage of Covent Garden Theatre is seen from the right with a small part of the pit in the left foreground; the boxes and galleries adjoining the stage form the background on the left. The pittites are standing and blow trumpets, spring...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 8 Feb 2022

Thomas Virgo notebook on gardening, cookery, remedies…

A notebook kept by Thomas Virgo, a gardener, in which he records a wide range of observations on the best care for specific plants he uses but also advice on thatching, the making of ice and ponds, catching wasps, building fires and other areas that hint...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 2 Feb 2022

A new book on Vauxhall Gardens!

If you have loved Bridgerton, Vanity Fair, Sanditon and the many other books and TV series to feature a twirl around Vauxhall Gardens you will welcome this new volume of essays by David E. Coke, a leading expert in London’s pleasure gardens of the 18th...
From: Naomi Clifford on 6 Jan 2022

Books for Christmas/Break

Classes have just ended and after grading I will attack the big pile of books by my bedside: I’ve already dipped into one or two but I have a full month with very few obligations ahead of me to really indulge. As I’ve been consumed with writing my...
From: streets of salem on 14 Dec 2021

Reading the Gardens at Vallée aux Loups

Age of Revolutions is happy to present its “Art of Revolution” series. You can read through the entire series here as they become available. By Kyra Sanchez Clapper Like the transitionary periods between philosophical movements, private gardens...
From: Age of Revolutions on 29 Nov 2021

5 difficult to access Tudor tombs (and how to find out more about them)

Parish churches across England house a wealth of historic memorials. Most of these can be freely accessed by visitors (although, it is advisable to check in advance whether the church is unlocked on a daily basis! This is especially important at the moment...
From: Kirsten Claiden-Yardley on 4 Nov 2021

A Picky Guide to October in Salem

I think this might be the first time I’ve written up a “things to do” in Salem for Halloween, a holiday that lasts for at least two months here and seems to be on the way to becoming a year-long “celebration” with perhaps a month break for Christmas....
From: streets of salem on 9 Oct 2021

September 16

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “George Spriggs, Gardner to John Hancock, Esq.” In the early 1770s, George Spriggs supplied colonists with fruit trees.  In September 1771, he placed advertisements in the...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 16 Sep 2021

The Comedy of Errors (RSC) @ The Lydia & Manfred Gorvy Garden Theatre

‘Capitalism!’ crooned the four-strong Chorus who provided an acapella doo-wop score for Phillip Breen’s Comedy of Errors. Errors isn’t a play which demands a subtle approach, and the singers identifying the core interpretive ethos of this production...
From: The Bardathon on 19 Aug 2021

The Journey of the Hairy Fruit

By Semine Long-Callesen and Nancy Valladares  In winter of 2020, we travelled to Honduras to visit Nancy’s family. Driving across the country from south to north and along the west coast, we passed an endless landscape of banana and coffee plantations....
From: The Recipes Project on 29 Jul 2021

Plan a “Jane-cation”: At home or abroad

Taking a vacation—whether it’s a staycation or a trip—is all about taking a break from your everyday activities to rest, relax, and get refreshed. As things continue to reopen, it’s fun to think about ways to make the summer season special. And...
From: Jane Austen's World on 12 Jul 2021

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.