The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Garden"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Garden found 264 posts

Reading the Gardens at Vallée aux Loups

Age of Revolutions is happy to present its “Art of Revolution” series. You can read through the entire series here as they become available. By Kyra Sanchez Clapper Like the transitionary periods between philosophical movements, private gardens...
From: Age of Revolutions on 29 Nov 2021

5 difficult to access Tudor tombs (and how to find out more about them)

Parish churches across England house a wealth of historic memorials. Most of these can be freely accessed by visitors (although, it is advisable to check in advance whether the church is unlocked on a daily basis! This is especially important at the moment...
From: Kirsten Claiden-Yardley on 4 Nov 2021

A Picky Guide to October in Salem

I think this might be the first time I’ve written up a “things to do” in Salem for Halloween, a holiday that lasts for at least two months here and seems to be on the way to becoming a year-long “celebration” with perhaps a month break for Christmas....
From: streets of salem on 9 Oct 2021

September 16

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “George Spriggs, Gardner to John Hancock, Esq.” In the early 1770s, George Spriggs supplied colonists with fruit trees.  In September 1771, he placed advertisements in the...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 16 Sep 2021

The Comedy of Errors (RSC) @ The Lydia & Manfred Gorvy Garden Theatre

‘Capitalism!’ crooned the four-strong Chorus who provided an acapella doo-wop score for Phillip Breen’s Comedy of Errors. Errors isn’t a play which demands a subtle approach, and the singers identifying the core interpretive ethos of this production...
From: The Bardathon on 19 Aug 2021

The Journey of the Hairy Fruit

By Semine Long-Callesen and Nancy Valladares  In winter of 2020, we travelled to Honduras to visit Nancy’s family. Driving across the country from south to north and along the west coast, we passed an endless landscape of banana and coffee plantations....
From: The Recipes Project on 29 Jul 2021

Plan a “Jane-cation”: At home or abroad

Taking a vacation—whether it’s a staycation or a trip—is all about taking a break from your everyday activities to rest, relax, and get refreshed. As things continue to reopen, it’s fun to think about ways to make the summer season special. And...
From: Jane Austen's World on 12 Jul 2021

Harlequin and Mother Goose, or, The golden egg

A writing sheet illustrated with scenes from Thomas Dibdin’s pantomime, first performed at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, on Boxing Day 1806, a few months before this sheet was issued. There were at least twelve different scenes in Dibdin’s work,...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 9 Jul 2021

New Theatre Royal, Covent-Garden

A playbill   Title: New Theatre Royal, Covent–Garden, this present Saturday, May 26, 1810, will be acted Shakspeare’s historical play of King Henry the Eighth … : Cardinal Wolsey, Mr. Kemble … Cromwell, Mr. C. Kemble … Katharine, Queen...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 30 Jun 2021

New Humanist: Islands of Abandonment by Cal Flyn

Cloud islands, they are called. The peaks of the Usumbara Mountains in Tanzania rise so high that fogs form on their slopes where the cool mountain air meets warmer currents rising off the sea. The climate has created a unique ecosystem, as real islands...
From: Mathew Lyons on 24 Jun 2021

Remembering Terry Turner (1929-2019): Pharmaceutical History Collector Extraordinaire

By Laurence Totelin, with input from Briony Hudson A few years ago, my colleagues Heather Trickey (social sciences), Julia Sanders (midwifery) and I decided to put together a small exhibition on the history of infant feeding, with a focus on Wales where...
From: The Recipes Project on 24 Jun 2021

A Bush Garden

Last week I spent a day in Kennebunkport, a town long associated with the Bush family because of Walker’s Point, which was purchased by President H.W. Bush’s maternal great- and grandfather after the turn of the last century. The usual congregation...
From: streets of salem on 23 Jun 2021

Valuable life annuities, with equitable assurance old policies

Title: Valuable life annuities, with equitable assurance old policies, and Covent-Garden Theatre shares. Particulars of four very desirable annuities, seventy-two pounds nine shillings each, clear of all deduction, … payable out of the money arising...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 12 May 2021

March 7

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “New Garden SEEDS, JUST IMPORTED By Elizabeth Greenleaf.” It was a sign of spring approaching.  Each year in the late 1760s and early 1770s women who sold seeds...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 7 Mar 2021

December 3

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Any quantity of seedling plants of the different species, can be got ready at a short notice, to be shipped to any Part of the World.” Thomas Vallentine wanted his...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 3 Dec 2020

The Multifarious Mr. Banks: From Botany Bay to Kew, The Natural Historian Who Shaped the World. A review of the book written by Toby Musgrave

Foreword by Tony Grant, the reviewer. Before I start into Toby Musgrave’s well researched and deeply considered and heartfelt life and times of the ”father of Botany,” Joseph Banks, and all its implications to us and our world today,...
From: Jane Austen's World on 19 Oct 2020

September 16

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “The best Clubs, and the greatest Entertainments in this City, were at the above Tavern.” Samuel Fraunces was one of the most illustrious tavernkeepers of his day. ...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 16 Sep 2020

The Gardener’s Labyrinth

I’m having this really neat synchronicity of research, writing and life right now, as I’m working on Chapter Three of my book, which is focused on Elizabethan horticulture. So I get up, water my garden, and then go upstairs into my study and...
From: streets of salem on 11 Aug 2020

Summer 2020 Reading List: What I Would Have Read

I’m a bit late with this summer reading list: it’s August! And this list is more intentional than actual, so I’m not going to be able to give informed commentary on most of these books. I planned to read all of them, but as soon as the...
From: streets of salem on 4 Aug 2020

Riverside Gardens

Sunny June continues, showcasing gardens all around me in the Seacoast region of southern Maine and coastal New Hampshire. I’m back to Salem today, and then off on other adventures, but first I wanted to share some photographs of gardens along (or...
From: streets of salem on 23 Jun 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.