The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Gardens"

Showing 1 - 20 of 125

Your search for posts with tags containing Gardens found 125 posts

Portrait of 18C American Woman

1763 William Johnston 1732-1772 Mrs Samuel Gardiner Met
From: 18th-century American Women on 24 Aug 2019

Botanical Gardens

Rudolf  II as "Vertumnus"(c. 1590)Giuseppe Arcimboldo.In 1543-44 new botanical gardens were founded in Pisa; L’Orto Botanico was its Italian name. It was the very first garden devoted to the research of plants. Literally within a...
From: Conciatore on 23 Aug 2019

Whirlwind Weekend

I am pleasantly tired at the end of a busy weekend, which included: a sunset sail, several garden walks, a tour of the Coast Guard’s tall ship Eagle, long conversations into the night, the annual vintage car show on Chestnut Street, and...
From: streets of salem on 12 Aug 2019

A Statesman’s Summer House

I was up in New Hampshire this past weekend for a spectacular summer wedding on Dublin Lake, and of course I made time for side trips; the Granite State continues to be a place of perpetual discovery for me after a lifetime of merely driving around or...
From: streets of salem on 29 Jul 2019

Hildegarde’s Gardening Book

The granddaughter of Nathaniel Hawthorne, Hildegarde Hawthorne (Oskinson) followed in the family business and published a wide variety of works over her lifetime (1871-1952), including children’s books, travel books, poetry, and biographies. I posted...
From: streets of salem on 20 Jul 2019

Men & women adopt the Greenhouse in Early America

The possibility of growing tender plants in greenhouses had fascinated early Americans at least since the 1st half of the 18C in colonial America. But the price of glass in colonial & early America remained high until nearly the middle of the 19C,...
From: 18th-century American Women on 28 Apr 2014

Rose Reverie

These are the rose weeks of the summer in central New England: while newer varieties of roses are bred to be repeat- or ever-blooming the older varieties bloom now, so if you walk the streets of an older city or town you’re going to see bursting...
From: streets of salem on 24 Jun 2019

We just Beauties See

I’ve always loved the seventeenth-century poem by Ben Jonson It is not Growing like a Tree with its closing lines In small proportions we just beauties see; And in short measures, life may perfect be. It evokes the ephemeral...
From: streets of salem on 5 Jun 2019

Brandywine Weekend

I am just back from a long weekend spent in the Brandywine Valley spanning the border of Pennsylvania and Delaware. A few friends and I drove down principally to visit Winterthur, but I think we were blindsided by all the attractions of this beautiful...
From: streets of salem on 30 Apr 2019

A scene in a nunnery garden

Two young women, attired in low-cut, fine dresses, their veils pulled back over their hair exposing their pretty, young faces, sit in a semi-embrace on a blue loveseat in a garden, one looking lovingly into the eyes of the other with her hand posed to...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 13 Dec 2018

Botanical Gardens

Rudolf  II as "Vertumnus"(c. 1590)Giuseppe Arcimboldo.In 1543-44 new botanical gardens were founded in Pisa; L’Orto Botanico was its Italian name. It was the very first garden devoted to the research of plants. Literally within a...
From: Conciatore on 19 Nov 2018

Dark Flora

I picked up this beautiful coffee table book the other day: Foraged Flora by Louesa Roebuck and Sarah Lonsdale, floral designer and writer/editor respectively. The photographs were so beautiful, I had to have it, but I hesitated, as apart from...
From: streets of salem on 31 Oct 2018

Where are all the Quince Trees?

I am encountering so many references to quinces in my early modern recipe books and regimens: to eat, to preserve, in tarts and jellies and marmalade, of course. These English people really loved quinces, or they depended on them, and so they...
From: streets of salem on 9 Oct 2018

Beautiful but Deadly

In support of the summer-long celebration of the 350th anniversary of the Turner-Ingersoll Mansion in Salem, better known as the House of the Seven Gables, Salem State has offered up a Hawthorne film series in partnership with the Salem Maritime National...
From: streets of salem on 22 Jul 2018

London’s population of 18th century wooden dragons returns after being wiped out by a mini ice age and volcano

The dragons are now back up in Kew gardens after 234 years ( Historic Royal Palaces ).https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/kew-gardens-dragons-return-18th-century-pagoda-china-william-chambers-a8444061.html
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 13 Jul 2018

Celebrated Gardens of Salem

A while ago I scored the first volume of a classic text of early American gardens, Gardens of Colony and State, compiled and edited for the Garden Club of America by Alice G.B. Lockwood in 1931. I’ve seldom been without it since; I can’t...
From: streets of salem on 25 Jun 2018

Coming up Roses

I’m in a bit of a funk about our city right now, but still mid-June is glorious nearly everywhere in New England, and Salem is no exception: it’s time to celebrate the roses, and the lushness all around us. Roses are spilling under and over...
From: streets of salem on 18 Jun 2018

June 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? New-York Journal (June 9, 1768).“The Fire-Works will be disposed in the following Order.” Colonists in New York, especially those who read the New-York Journal,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 12 Jun 2018

Gardens, Emotions and Shakespeare

By Andrew Lynch and Bob White (The University of Western Australia) The Opening of the Shakespeare Garden at UWA.Shakespeare and gardens go together. There are Shakespeare gardens from Stratford-upon-Avon to Central Park in New York, the Huntington Library...
From: Histories of Emotion on 8 Jun 2018

Aesthetic or Au Naturel?

This past weekend I spent an hour or so browsing (digitally) through Eugène Grasset’s La plante et ses applications ornementales (1896) and then stepped outside to see that my lady’s slippers were in full bloom:  no competition,...
From: streets of salem on 30 May 2018

Page 1 of 7123456Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.