The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Gaul"

Your search for posts with tags containing Gaul found 14 posts

Eugene Sue’s “Mysteries of the People” (1848): “The Branding Needle” and the First French Commune | Stephen Basdeo

By Stephen Basdeo, a writer and historian based in Leeds, United Kingdom. This article follows on from previous posts on Eugene Sue’s epic socialist novel Mysteries of the People. Previous discussions on the first six volumes can be found here: ...

Eugene Sue’s “Mysteries of the People” (1848): “The Poniard’s Hilt” and the Arrival of Feudalism in France | Stephen Basdeo

By Stephen Basdeo, a writer and historian based in Leeds, United Kingdom. This article follows on from previous posts on Eugene Sue’s epic socialist novel Mysteries of the People. Visionary French Author Eugene Sue (Stephen Basdeo Collection)...

Eugene Sue’s Epic Socialist Novel “The Mysteries of the People” (1848): “The Casque’s Lark”

By Stephen Basdeo, a writer and historian based in Leeds UK. Eugene Sue Introduction In 1848 Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels wrote the Communist Manifesto. In it, they argued that all history was essentially the history of class struggle....

Eugene Sue’s Epic Socialist Novel “The Mysteries of the People” (1848): “The Iron Collar” and “The Silver Cross”

Stephen Basdeo In 1848 the master of the “mysteries” novels, Eugene Sue, began the weekly serialisation of a new novel: Mysteries of the People. It was a chronicle of a proletarian family—originally the Brenn clan—and their...

“Mysteries of the People” (1848): Eugene Sue’s Epic Socialist Novel

By Stephen Basdeo In 1848 the master of the “mysteries” novels, Eugene Sue, began the weekly serialisation of a new novel: Mysteries of the People. It was a chronicle of a proletarian family, and their descendants, who participated in all...

“Lodgings now are hardly to be had”

Continuing the topic of “searching for a new home”, compare the experience of MARY STEAD PINCKNEY in Paris. Upon arriving on December 5, 1796, Mary Stead Pinckney and her husband, General Charles Cotesworth Pinckney were far less fortunate...
From: In the Words of Women on 18 Jun 2018

Medieval Arabic recipes and the history of hummus

By Anny Gaul Between the tenth and fourteenth centuries, cookbooks flourished throughout the Arabic-speaking world, from Baghdad to Murcia. Fortunately for scholars, in recent decades both critical Arabic editions and English translations of these cookbooks...
From: The Recipes Project on 27 Mar 2018

16th-century Surgical Instruments: Forcipes denticulatae

Some of the ornate forceps in Jean Tagault’s De chirurgica institutione (Venice, 1544). I particularly like the little dragon heads on the ends of the handles. This copy is from Haverford’s Special Collections, call #R128.6 .T3 1544.Jean Tagault...
From: Darin Hayton on 16 Dec 2016

Before Hamilton: Staging the French Revolution in the 1970s

By Jonathyne Briggs (with assistance from Regan Briggs) The recent critical fanfare accompanying Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Hamilton reveals its impact beyond the Great White Way, perhaps the first time in decades that Broadway has claimed a...
From: Age of Revolutions on 6 Jun 2016

Appel à communication : « Présence des divinités et des cultes dans les campagnes de la Gaule romaine » (Nantes, 11-12 octobre 2016)

En Gaule, les œuvres relevant des arts figurés, peintures, mosaïques ou sculptures, étaient pour une grande part des représentations de divinités mythologiques gauloises et gréco-romaines. De nombreuses inscriptions...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 30 Apr 2016

Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk, Barbican Centre

You arrive at the first room of the Gaultier installation in a room full of mannequins under blue light. They’re grouped into visual themes that echo the key motifs in his work: the sailor stripe, the mermaid, the Virgin Mary. Seeing the detail of the...
From: Parthenissa on 24 Aug 2014

The Knight of the Burning Pestle, Sam Wanamaker Playhouse

I missed The Duchess of Malfi, so my trip south of the river last week was my first time at the new Sam Wanamaker Playhouse, which has been built to put on the sort of plays that weren’t originally staged at the Globe but at the indoor Blackfriars theatre....
From: Parthenissa on 2 Mar 2014

Matthew Hopkins, Witchfinder General and Vile-Hearted Renaissance Peckerhead of the Month

Lately, I’ve been a little obsessed with early modern witchcraft. Perhaps it’s because of the poppet in my hedge. Or perhaps it’s because I took the BBC’s online quiz “Would You Have Been Accused of Witchcraft” (short answer: yes). Probably...
From: Out of Time on 6 Jul 2013

An American in London

The young Peter Manigault (1731—1773), as was the case with many of his contemporaries, was sent from Charleston to London by his family in order to complete his education. Manigault arrived in England in the summer of 1750, and returned to America...
From: Kirby and his world on 29 May 2013