The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Gender"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Gender found 539 posts

Franco-American Culture Wars

American multiculturalism and intellectual influences are increasingly threatening French identity, according to French President Macron and his ministers. The New York Times reports on the developing Franco-American Culture Wars: “Stepping...

Beard Fashions and Class

Over the past few centuries, fashions in facial hair have changed substantially. In the mid seventeenth century many men wore the ‘Van Dyke’ style of a small, pointy beard and moustaches. By the end of the 1600s, beards were in decline, leaving...
From: DrAlun on 24 Feb 2021

Gender Concealed: How to get a boy in the early modern era

Gender reveal parties, which started some time in the 2000s, have become increasingly elaborate and Instagram worthy. Some excessive stunts have even caused raging wildfires. When I was younger these parties weren’t around but I do remember old...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 10 Feb 2021

Register for the Consortium on the Revolutionary Era, 1750-1850!

The annual Consortium on the Revolutionary Era, 1750-1850 will be held virtually from February 18-20 & 26-27 and will be free to all who register. You can register for the conference here. For the full list of CRE Board of Directors, click here....
From: Age of Revolutions on 5 Feb 2021

Anne Rossignol, Madame Dumont, and Dr. John Schmidt Junior: Community and Accommodation in Charleston, South Carolina, 1790 – 184

This post is a part of the 2020 Selected Papers of the Consortium on the Revolutionary Era, which were edited and compiled by members of the CRE’s board alongside editors at Age of Revolutions. By Suzanne Krebsbach In 1857, physician John...
From: Age of Revolutions on 1 Feb 2021

Loyalists and the Birth of Libraries in New England: The Marriage of Martin and Abigail Howard

This post is a part of the 2020 Selected Papers of the Consortium on the Revolutionary Era, which were edited and compiled by members of the CRE’s board alongside editors at Age of Revolutions. By Abby Chandler Martin Howard was a Revolutionary...
From: Age of Revolutions on 13 Jan 2021

The Literary and scientific stakes of transgender in eighteenth-century Italy and England: the case of Catterina Vizzani

The power of narrative prose to capture, represent, and inspire transgender lives bursts forth in the pages of the new anthology, Resilience, reminding us that identities remain invisible until they are featured in fictional enactments, documentaries,...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 5 Nov 2020

Things of Darkness and Early Modern Critical Race Studies

The Center for Renaissance Studies at the Newberry Library is hosting a series of discussions on Race in Dialogue, which focuses on critical race studies in the humanities. Graduate students in HIST 522 Early Modern Europe at Northern Illinois University...

Artemisia Gentileschi Exhibition in London

A major exhibition on Artemisia Gentileschi’s paintings just opened at the National Gallery in London. The New York Times reports: “The National Gallery opted for a one-word title for its new blockbuster show: ‘Artemisia.’...

Outmoded Midwives?

Gender wars of the medical kind for this week’s #SalemSuffrageSaturday post, although I am uncertain of how much of a battle was waged here in Salem. Commencing in the seventeenth century with the efforts of the emigre Chamberlen brothers, armed...
From: streets of salem on 3 Oct 2020

The Disappearing Daughters of Jerusalem: Erasing Women from Early Canadian Methodist History

Scott McLaren “The greater part of an author’s time is spent in reading,” Samuel Johnson is widely reported to have said. “He must turn over half a library to write one book.” What Johnson didn’t say is that in the...
From: Borealia on 16 Sep 2020

Vénus Noire: An Interview with Robin Mitchell

Vénus Noire: Black Women and Colonial Fantasies in Nineteenth Century France is a rigorously researched study of Black women in France in the nineteenth century that explores the production of whiteness and blackness through the cultural mania...
From: Age of Revolutions on 31 Aug 2020

Women, gender and non-lethal violence in Quarter Sessions petitioning narratives

Cleaned-up and slightly extended version of a paper presented at the conference Gender and Violence in the Early Modern World (University of Cambridge, 23 November 2019). Introduction In 1594 Allys Whittingham, William Bealey and Margery his wife petitioned...
From: Early Modern Notes on 13 Aug 2020

‘The Frolic of the Day’: Harvest Work and Forms of Labour

The harvest was the heartbeat of the preindustrial economy, and how the associated work was organised provides valuable insights into the character of labour relationships (something we have explored in an earlier blog post). Here, project PI Jane Whittle...
From: Forms of Labour on 12 Aug 2020

Revisiting Chelsea Clark’s The Wonders of Unicorn Horns: Preventions and Cures for Poisoning

Editor’s note: Today, we revisit a wonderful post from Chelsea Clark in 2012 on the intersection of magic and medicine from Early Modern England. Drawing on the seventeenth century  manuscript ascribed to the herbalist Johanna St. John, Clark...
From: The Recipes Project on 25 Jun 2020

Appel à communication : « Artistes-enseignantes au XXe siècle : la transmission au prisme du genre » (Paris, 3-4 déc. 2020)

Colloque « Artistes-enseignantes au XXe siècle : la transmission au prisme du genre » Paris, Ecole des Chartes, 3-4 décembre 2020 Date limite 20 septembre 2020 Tout au long du XXe siècle, les écoles d’art...
From: Le blog de l'APAHAU on 31 May 2020

Abreu-Ferreira Wins the Oliveira Marques Prize

Congratulaitons to Darlene Abreu-Ferreira for winning ASPHS’s 2019 A.H. de Oliveira-Marques Prize for “Women and the Acquisition, Transmission, and Execution of Public Offices in Early Modern Portugal,” Gender and History 31/2 (2019):...
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 6 May 2020

Women Also Know Loyalists

Rebecca Brannon, Lauren Duval, and Kacy Tillman [Welcome to part two of a conversation among three historians of the American Revolution, focusing on new directions in loyalist studies. In the first part, Professors Brannon, Duval, and Tillman discussed...
From: Borealia on 6 May 2020

Women Also Know Revolution

Rebecca Brannon, Lauren Duval, and Kacy Tillman [Welcome to part one of a conversation among three historians of the American Revolution, focusing on the political agency and experiences of women. In the second part, Brannon, Duval, and Tillman turn their...
From: Borealia on 4 May 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.