The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Gentility"

Your search for posts with tags containing Gentility found 17 posts

October

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “All Sorts of Gold, Silver, and Silk.” Barnaby Andrews, an “IMBROIDERER,” placed a notice in the October 22, 1770, edition of the New-York Gazette and Weekly...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 22 Oct 2020

September 7

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “MANTU-MAKER, FROM BOSTON.” Over the past few days the Adverts 250 Project has examined the manner in which purveyors of goods and services in the colonies incorporated...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 7 Sep 2020

September 6

“TOUT A LA MODE.” George Lafong introduced himself to the ladies and gentlemen of Williamsburg as a “French HAIR-DRESSER” in an advertisement in the September 6, 1770, edition of William Rind’s Virginia Gazette.  Apparently,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 6 Sep 2020

June 16

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “They may depend on having their Commands executed after the newest and most genteel Fashions.” When Daniel Stillwell, a tailor, placed an advertisement in the June...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 16 Jun 2020

April 28

GUEST CURATOR: Patrick Waters What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? New-Hampshire Gazette (April 28, 1769). “A SCHOOL for teaching young MASTERS and MISSES, DANCING and GOOD MANNERS.” Peter Curtis took out...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 28 Apr 2019

September 26

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Newport Mercury (September 26, 1768).“A Dancing-School is not for Diversion or Exercise only, but is designed to reform their Manners and Behaviour.” When fall arrived...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 26 Sep 2018

September 7

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Georgia Gazette (September 7, 1768).“THE subscriber WILL OPEN A SCHOOL FOR DANCING.” Compared to bustling cities like Boston, Charleston, New York, and Philadelphia,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 7 Sep 2018

May 16

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Pennsylvania Chronicle (May 16, 1768).“BURROWS DOWDNEY … MAKES and repairs all Kinds od Clocks and Watches.”   When it came to advertising, watch- and clockmaker...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 16 May 2018

September 4

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? South-Carolina and American General Gazette (September 4, 1767).“PIKE’s DANCING SCHOOL.” Mr. Pike, a dancing and fencing instructor, was well known to the residents...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 4 Sep 2017

June 19

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? New-Hampshire Gazette (June 19, 1767).“He proposes to open a DANCING SCHOOL.” Peter Curtis wished to open a dancing school in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, and inserted...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 19 Jun 2017

April 19

GUEST CURATOR: Jonathan Bisceglia What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? South-Carolina and American General Gazette (April 19, 1767).“A Genteel Lodging and Boarding for a single Gentleman, Enquire in Tradd-street,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 19 Apr 2017

April 5

GUEST CURATOR: Megan Watts What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? Providence Gazette (April 5, 1767).“A FRESH and NEW Assortment of English and India Goods.” I chose this advertisement because it specifically...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 5 Apr 2017

January 19

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? New-York Mercury (January 19, 1767).“SKATES, OF different sizes.” Hubert Van Wagenen sold a variety of goods – from “Ironmongery and Cutlery” to textiles...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 19 Jan 2017

Research from the Kitchen: Emma Schreiber’s “Apple Jelly for a Corner Dish”

By Rachel A. Snell “Boil 12 good juicy apples or more if not of a large size in a pint of spring water,” Emma Schreiber’s Apple Jelly for a Corner Dish, a recipe for a molded apple jelly served with custard, begins with a curious...
From: The Recipes Project on 15 Dec 2016

November

GUEST CURATOR: Patrick Keane What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Providence Gazette (November 22, 1766).“SUPERFINE broad cloths.” Gideon Young sold imported materials at his shop that people could use...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 22 Nov 2016

August 19

What was advertised in a colonial newspaper 250 years ago this week? New-York Mercury (August 18, 1766).“DANCING IS Taught by the Subscriber, in a genteel and easy Method.” John Trotter and other dancing masters regularly advertised their...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 19 Aug 2016

Snowballs: Intermixing Gentility and Frugality in Nineteenth Century Baking

By Rachel A. Snell For most readers, snowballs likely conjure memories of childhood winter games or, perhaps, the small, rounded cookies covered with shaved coconut or powdered sugar often prepared around the winter holidays. Of course, there is also...
From: The Recipes Project on 13 Aug 2015

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.