The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Geography"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Geography found 81 posts

‘It Is Forbidden’: Tobacco Bans and Public Space in Eighteenth-Century Stockholm

At 9pm on 24 November 1793, two policemen called Dickman and Bergström arrested an unknown man on the Högbergsgatan for smoking tobacco and being drunk. Called to the police chamber in Stockholm the following day, the man was fined five riksdaler,...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 3 Jul 2020

Conflict and the Coffeehouse: Three Stories from Eighteenth-Century Amsterdam

In several Dutch books, plays, and poems written between the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries, coffeehouses are portrayed as spaces in which rational and civilised conversation took place. According to these texts, the people (more specifically, men)...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 12 Jun 2020

June 3

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “At the sign of the Jolly Sailor.” In an era before standardized street numbers, advertisers resorted to a variety of means of describing their locations. ...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 3 Jun 2020

Plague Time: Intoxicating Spaces and Pestilence in Seventeenth-Century London

One of the most challenging aspects of the lockdown and social distancing measures necessitated by COVID–19 are the restrictions placed on the intoxicating spaces of everyday life. The inability to visit coffee shops, pubs, restaurants and tea bars...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 22 Apr 2020

Some Out of Town Jasper

As I quoted yesterday, in 1853 a story surfaced saying that Josiah Waters, Jr., had delivered intelligence about the impending British army march on 18 Apr 1775.This story is significant in predating Henry W. Longfellow’s poem “Paul Revere’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Apr 2020

Intoxicating Pharmacies? Apothecary Shops and New Intoxicants in Amsterdam, 1600–185

Thinking about intoxicating spaces, apothecary shops are probably not what first springs to mind. Yet, these places are very relevant in discussing the assimilation of new intoxicants into European diets. It may seem strange to us today, but they virtually...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 6 Mar 2020

Ground Level: Exploring London’s Historical Coffeehouses

One of early modern London’s most common intoxicating spaces was the coffeehouse; a 1739 survey by historian and topographer William Maitland identified 551 institutions in the capital (although the real figure was probably higher), while by the...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 11 Feb 2020

The Atlas of Boston History is a big book. I just got my copy, and it’s 14 inches tall and 11 inches...

The Atlas of Boston History is a big book. I just got my copy, and it’s 14 inches tall and 11 inches wide, 224 full-color pages of maps, charts, and other illustrations of Boston history.I got a copy because I worked with editor Nancy S. Seasholes...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Oct 2019

Upcoming Events in Charlestown and Weston

Here are a couple of interesting Revolutionary history happenings in the next few days.On Thursday, 25 April, the Bunker Hill Museum will host a talk by Salem Maritime National Historic Site historian Emily Murphy titled “‘I Am An Honest Woman’:...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Apr 2019

Looking for the Tea Party Location Today

In the 1850 Boston Evening Transcript story about public memory of the Boston Tea Party that I quoted a couple of days ago, John Russell wrote: “Very few persons now know where to find Griffin’s Wharf, the name of which should have been preserved...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Dec 2018

Colonizing St. John Island: A History in Maps

S. Max Edelson This essay examines the Board of Trade’s survey and plan for St. John Island (renamed Prince Edward in 1798). It is part of a larger study of British surveying and colonization in the maritime northeast, which is the focus of chapter...
From: Borealia on 14 Nov 2018

Early-Modern Place Names in Today’s Canada

Lauren Beck The Geographic Names Board of Canada (GNBC) provides scholars with a database of place names that allows users to look up the location of a place name, but that’s about all the information one can glean from this utility. The provinces...
From: Borealia on 10 Oct 2018

La cartographie des routes impériales françaises: le cas du fleuve Saint-Laurent au XVIIIe siècle

Çà et là, l’historiographie a rappelé le rôle singulier de la cartographie pratiquée dans un contexte colonial : offrir des connaissances géographiques aux dirigeants qui souhaitent asseoir leur...
From: Borealia on 3 Oct 2018

“There are no Barracks in the Town”

Thursday, 22 Sept 1768, was not only the first day of the extralegal Massachusetts Convention of Towns. It was also the anniversary of the coronation of George III. That royal holiday was accordingly observed in Boston, as the Boston Evening-Post described:by...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Sep 2018

Frogs and Cats, or, Access and Privilege

I have never heard anything like those frogs. I was crunching along the gravel walkway from Historic Jamestowne back to the bus after the final reception of the Omohundro Institute conference in June. As I walked through the woods, the James River at...
From: The Junto on 5 Sep 2018

Artists in Paris: Digital Mapping and the Cultural Geography of the 18th-Century Art World

By Hannah Williams  Paris is famous for its art world. You don’t need to be an art historian to have heard of Montmartre or Montparnasse and to know about the crucial role that the city and its local neighborhoods played in the cultural histories...
From: Age of Revolutions on 25 Jun 2018

The Hourglass Effect and Its Discontents

Last month the Panorama, the blog of the Journal of the American Republic, shared Nathan Perl-Rosenthal’s essay “The Hourglass Effect in Teaching the American Revolution.” Perl-Rosenthal, a professor at the University of Southern California,...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Jun 2018

Itinéraire d’un savant au XVIIIe siècle: Jean-Baptiste d’Anville

Les hésitations professionnelles des jeunes adultes, la difficulté à vivre de son art pour un savant ou un artiste, la nécessité de multiplier les activités rémunérées, autant de problématiques...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 7 May 2018

Qui est Jean-Baptiste d’Anville, géographe français des Lumières?

Jean-Baptiste d’Anville, savant parisien du XVIIIe siècle, est l’un des plus grands géographes du siècle des Lumières. Pour ses contemporains, ses cartes modernes sont incontournables. Bougainville, l’explorateur,...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 3 May 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.