The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "George I"

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Your search for posts with tags containing George I found 247 posts

The Abdication(s) of King George III

On April 1, 2015, Queen Elizabeth II announced the creation of the Georgian Papers Programme. It is a ten-year project to transcribe, digitize, conserve,... The post The Abdication(s) of King George III appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Out of court

“Lady Conyngham chases Eldon from the royal precincts; she threatens him with the sceptre and a clenched fist, saying, Je le veut [sic]. She is décolletée, much bejewelled, and displays an elephantine leg and tiny foot. Close behind her stands Knighton,...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 24 Jun 2022

George III’s (Implicit) Sanction of the American Revolution

In Summary View of the Rights of British America (1774), Jefferson wrote of King George III’s unwillingness to use his “negative” to veto unjust proposals.... The post George III’s (Implicit) Sanction of the American Revolution appeared first...

King Frederick the Great and the American Colonies: The Preliminaries

Upon the death of his grandfather on May 31, 1740, Frederick William II of the House of Hohenzollern became the King of Prussia. Over... The post King Frederick the Great and the American Colonies: The Preliminaries appeared first on Journal of the American...

An eclipse

“The irradiated head of George IV in profile to the left, is almost covered by the darkly shaded head of Wellington, which is almost full-face, but glaring to the right with fierce yet apprehensive melancholy. From this darkened mask slants down and...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 24 May 2022

The head ranger and his fallow deer

“George IV, dressed as a sportsman, in a broad-brimmed hat, jacket with many pockets, and gaiters above the knee, walks in Windsor Park beside a deer with a woman’s head and wearing a collar inscribed ‘Chester’. He puts his arm round her neck,...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 29 Apr 2022

The 25th Grievance of the Declaration of Independence

When Thomas Jefferson wrote the twenty-seven grievances against the King listed in the Declaration of Independence, he did so with the intention of encapsulating... The post The 25th Grievance of the Declaration of Independence appeared first on Journal...

This Week on Dispatches: Mark R. Anderson on the Fate of King George III’s Bust in Montreal

On this week’s Dispatches, host Brady Crytzer interviews independent historian and JAR contributor Mark R. Anderson on the fate of King George III’s bust... The post This Week on Dispatches: Mark R. Anderson on the Fate of King George III’s Bust...

King George III’s Montreal Bust in a Pattern of Iconoclasm

Throughout history, changes in political order have often been accompanied by the destruction of the old regime’s images and monuments. The July 9, 1776... The post King George III’s Montreal Bust in a Pattern of Iconoclasm appeared first on Journal...

How Eighteenth-Century Governments Worked | Stephen Basdeo

Stephen Basdeo is a historian and writer based in Leeds, United Kingdom, whose research interests include the popular literature of the period c.1750–c.1850. Introduction I recently had the pleasure of revisiting John W. Derry’s Politics...

The Last King of America: The Misunderstood Reign of King George III

BOOK REVIEW: The Last King of America: The Misunderstood Reign of King George III by Andrew Roberts (New York: Viking, 2021) In 1774, a... The post The Last King of America: The Misunderstood Reign of King George III appeared first on Journal of the American...

The Wives of George IV: Out Now

I'm thrilled to report that my new book, The Wives of George IV: The Secret Bride & the Scorned Princess, is out now from Pen & Sword Books. It's available from this link, or your favourite bookshop!In Georgian England, few men were more fashionable...

Ode on His Majesty’s recovery

Author: Pratt, Mr. (Samuel Jackson), 1749-1814, author. Title: Ode on His Majesty’s recovery / by the author of Sympathy and humanity. Publication: London : Printed at the Logographic Press; and sold by J. Walter, No. 169, opposite Old Bond-Street,...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 23 Nov 2021

History Hack

 I had a wonderful time chatting to the folks from History Hack about the mistresses of George I and II. From rumours of murder to ghostly ravens and the grumpiest kings Hanover ever saw, it's all here!

Teaching the American Revolution in the United Kingdom

Teaching the American Revolution in the United Kingdom comes with baggage. But British students respond to it ways that an American might not expect.... The post Teaching the American Revolution in the United Kingdom appeared first on Journal of the American...

Farmer George’s wonderful monkey

“Social satire; Pitt the Younger portrayed as a monkey, with regalia and his crown hanging on a chain around his neck, in a field labelled “Windsor Park”; below the image a text explains that this animal is confounding naturalists, who suppose it...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 11 Oct 2021

‘An Unnatural Rebellion’: How the British Perceived the American Revolution

Today I’d like to welcome a new guest to All Things Georgian – Jordan Baker. Jordan holds a BA and MA in History from North Carolina State University. He is a lover of all things historical and concentrates his research and writing on the history...
From: All Things Georgian on 20 Sep 2021

The Regent's Bomb

The Georgians loved to rib the Prince Regent as often and as cheekily as possible! “A view of the R-g-t's bomb" by Charles Williams, 1816, is more concerned with the Prince’s was enormous bum than the mortar he received from the Spanish after the...

A Video Tour with Bridget Barbara: New York City’s Bowling Green and the Statue of King George III

The bronze Charging Bull sculpture is not the only iconic statue to have stood at the southern tip of Manhattan. In 1770, a large... The post A Video Tour with Bridget Barbara: New York City’s Bowling Green and the Statue of King George III appeared...

Book Review: ‘The Imprisoned Princess” by Catherine Curzon

When Queen Anne died in 1714, her throne should have passed to her younger brother, James (son of James II of England & VII of Scotland and Mary of Modena). But since James was a Catholic and the Act of Settlement of 1701 (during the reign of William...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 9 Jun 2021

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.