The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Georgia"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Georgia found 620 posts

August 16

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Georgia Gazette (August 16, 1769). “Would be glad to be employed in keeping of books.” Elizabeth Bedon’s advertisement proposing to open a boarding school in Savannah...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 16 Aug 2019

August 9

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Georgia Gazette (August 9, 1769). “A BOARDING SCHOOL in Savannah, for the education of young ladies.” In the summer of 1769 Elizabeth Bedon proposed opening a boarding...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 9 Aug 2019

Manly beauty: what can boxers tell us about 18th century masculinity? Part III

Boxers The other men in William Hogarth’s March of the Guards to Finchley (1750) that I want to talk about are the boxers. In the painting, so evocatively displayed at London Museum, a bare-knuckle prize-fight takes place in the middle-ground....
From: Joanne Begiato Muses on History on 7 Aug 2019

August

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Georgia Gazette (August 2, 1769). “THE subscribers being desirous to close all their concerns, in the dry good business.” Inglis and Hall were among the most prolific...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 2 Aug 2019

Rough and brave: what can soldiers tell us about 18th century masculinity? Part II

Guardsmen Let me begin with the guardsmen at the heart of William Hogarth’s The March of the Guards to Finchley (1750), the subject of a great exhibition at the Foundling Museum. They are an evocative depiction of the troubling charms of the...
From: Joanne Begiato Muses on History on 2 Aug 2019

Pugnacious and patriotic: what can soldiers and boxers tell us about 18th century masculinity? Part I

Recently, I had the privilege of talking about William Hogarth’s The March of the Guards to Finchley (1750) in one of the talks accompanying the Foundling Museum’s 2019 Exhibition Hogarth & The Art of Noise. This is a jewel of an exhibition...
From: Joanne Begiato Muses on History on 29 Jul 2019

July 26

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Georgia Gazette (July 26, 1769). “Who has for sale, all sorts of garden seeds and flower roots.” Colonists placed advertisements in newspapers for a variety of reasons....
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 26 Jul 2019

Sir Wolstan Dixie, 4th Baronet: myths and facts

We looked at Sir Wolstan Dixie, 4th Baronet of Market Bosworth in an earlier blog, and we promised we’d return to him in due course, to take a closer look at the man and his family. Sir Wolstan was a pugnacious and pig-headed bully, and legend suggests...
From: All Things Georgian on 23 Jul 2019

July 19

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Georgia Gazette (July 19, 1769). “PROPOSALS FOR CONTINUING AND IMPROVING The PENNSYLVANIA CHRONICLE.” In the spring of 1769, William Goddard launched an advertising...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 19 Jul 2019

Francis Blake Delaval, The Prankster

On August 6th, 1724 at St Ann’s Soho, Captain Francis Blake Delaval of Seaton Delaval Hall, near Newcastle Upon Tyne, married Rhoda Apreece, the heiress of Doddington Hall, which is somewhere we have previously written about. Rhoda Apreece (d.1759),...
From: All Things Georgian on 18 Jul 2019

Midsummer 1780 in the Carolinas and Georgia—Events predating the Battle of Camden

Besides dealing with events elsewhere, this article relates in particular the plight of the Carolina loyalists and the way in which British ascendancy in... The post Midsummer 1780 in the Carolinas and Georgia—Events predating the Battle of Camden...

July 1

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Georgia Gazette (July 12, 1769). “Boxes of medicines prepared for the use of plantations and shipping.” Lewis Johnson peddled an “Assortment of MEDICINES”...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 12 Jul 2019

To commit a fraud… leave your hat off!

August 1750 The breathless but smartly dressed clerk had clearly left the Bank of England in Threadneedle Street in a hurry, not even bothering to stop and put his hat on in his haste, nor to remove the pen which was stuck clumsily in his wig. When, on...
From: All Things Georgian on 9 Jul 2019

July 5

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Georgia Gazette (July 5, 1769). “He will sell so as shopkeepers can afford to retail them again.” When watchmaker Christopher Syberry announced to the public that he...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 5 Jul 2019

A Right Royal Face Off by Simon Edge

We are delighted to welcome the author, Simon Edge, journalist, critic and novelist, to our blog to tell us more about the challenges he face when writing his latest novel, due to be released in a few days time, A Right Royal Face Off: A Georgian Entertainment...
From: All Things Georgian on 4 Jul 2019

June 28

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Georgia Gazette (June 28, 1769). “To be sold at the Printing-Office … An HUMBLE ENQUIRY.” An advertisement for a pamphlet about politics appeared among the various...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 28 Jun 2019

The Rule of Thumb

In the eighteenth century a woman had few, if any, rights and was effectively a possession of her husband. We came across the term ‘the rule of thumb’ which had been quoted in the film ‘The Duchess‘  by Lady Elizabeth (Bess)...
From: All Things Georgian on 27 Jun 2019

David Holmes, Timothy Barnard, and Questionable Loyalties

With the Revolutionary War in full swing by August 1776, George Galphin penned a letter to his nephew, Timothy Barnard. Galphin started his letter... The post David Holmes, Timothy Barnard, and Questionable Loyalties appeared first on Journal of the American...

The Duchess of Devonshire’s Public Breakfast at Chiswick House, 18

Today, we’re taking you back in time to a public breakfast given by Georgiana, Duchess of Devonshire at the end of June 1802, at her villa, Chiswick House. Public it might have been, but entry was only for those ‘of note’ in the fashionable...
From: All Things Georgian on 25 Jun 2019

Brocaded Silk Shoes: James Adams, London Shoemaker, 1770s

I viewed these elegant court pumps from the collection of the Pilgrim Hall Museum, in Plymouth, MA. (www.pilgrimhall.org) on my summer research road trip in 2018. They are stunners. Vibrant, with high quality finish work, these c.1770s brocaded silk...
From: SilkDamask on 21 Jun 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.