The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Georgia"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Georgia found 714 posts

18th century gluttony

January is always associated with the making of New Year’s resolutions and one of these is often to go on a diet. With that in mind, in today’s post I’m taking a quick look through the Georgian newspapers in which I’ve come across...
From: All Things Georgian on 13 Jan 2021

Women of Revolutionary War Georgia

The September 3, 2020 issue of the Journal of the American Revolution published “Margaret Eustace and Her Family Pass Through the American Revolution.” Margaret Eustace, the... The post Women of Revolutionary War Georgia appeared...

All Things Georgian – A Year in Review

Just to let you know,  I’m taking a seasonal break now until Wednesday 13 January 2021, and  would like to take this opportunity to wish everyone seasons greetings and my sincerest wish for you all, that 2021 will be an improvement on...
From: All Things Georgian on 16 Dec 2020

Christmas Pye, Georgian Style, and other British Holiday Foods by Vic Sanborn

“I wish you a cheerful and at times even a Merry Christmas.” Jane Austen While Christmas festivities were not as commercial as they were during Queen Victoria’s and our time, families during Jane Austen’s era celebrated the holiday...
From: Jane Austen's World on 8 Dec 2020

Who was Selina Cordelia St Charles?

Today I am delighted to welcome a new guest to All Things Georgian, Paul Martinovich. After a career spent planning museum exhibits in North America and Ireland, Paul retired to pursue a longstanding interest in the Napoleonic Wars. He first came across...
From: All Things Georgian on 21 Oct 2020

This Week on Dispatches: Robert Scott Davis on Margaret Eustace and the American Revolution

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews historian, author, and JAR contributor Robert Scott Davis on Georgian socialite and possible British spy, Margaret Eustace,... The post This Week on Dispatches: Robert Scott Davis on Margaret...

George Bridgetower, violin virtuoso. Part Four

We have now reached the final part of the story and just in case you missed any, the previous parts can be found by clicking these links – Part 1, Part 2, Part 3. In this final part we return again to George and his wife Mary. In 1817 and they went...
From: All Things Georgian on 7 Oct 2020

George Bridgetower, violin virtuoso. Part Three

We begin the third part of George’s life in March 1794, but just in case you missed the earlier parts, click on the highlighted links to read part 1 and part two . George had been busy studying and performing at the New Theatre Royal, still under...
From: All Things Georgian on 30 Sep 2020

George Bridgetower, violin virtuoso. Part Two

Today we continue with the story of George’s life, but if you missed last weeks and would like to catch up, just click on this highlighted link. Charlotte Papendiek with her eldest son Frederick – a drawing by Thomas Lawrence, 1789, Metropolitan...
From: All Things Georgian on 23 Sep 2020

George Bridgetower, violin virtuoso. Part One

Over the next few weeks we are having a slight change to the usual weekly format in so much as I’m going to take a fairly detailed look at one person in particular and tell you a little about his life story and that of his family, so please do tune...
From: All Things Georgian on 16 Sep 2020

The Sussex Giantess – Jane Cobden

In the 18th and 19th centuries people were fascinated with people who were different in some way to the ‘average person’ and people such as the Sussex Giantess were bought by often unscrupulous people, to be on show for the paying public....
From: All Things Georgian on 9 Sep 2020

Margaret Eustace and Her Family Pass through the American Revolution

John L. Smith, Jr. introduced readers of the Journal of the American Revolution to Margaret Eustace in his article, “The Scandalous Divorce Case that Influenced... The post Margaret Eustace and Her Family Pass through the American Revolution...

Jane Austen’s Letter to her Sister Cassandra About a Ball in 1798

“You deserve a longer letter than this, but it is my unhappy fate seldom to treat people so well as they deserve…” – Jane Austen Introduction: In August, 1798, Rev George and Mrs. Austen and their daughters Cassandra and Jane...
From: Jane Austen's World on 31 Aug 2020

A Jane Austoe Sock Contest – Yeah! – and a short discourse on women’s work in the Regency Era

Excited readers, Chatty Feet, a cool, funky sock gift site, now features Jane Austoe socks! No, we are not kidding. Our Jane, who loved to walk, has joined the foot pantheon of other great writers: William Shakes-Feet, George Toe-Well, Virginia Woo, Ernestoe...
From: Jane Austen's World on 12 Aug 2020

The Clerical Alphabet: Problems in Austen’s Church of England By Brenda S. Co

It will, I believe, be everywhere found, that as the clergy are, or are not what they ought to be, so are the rest of the nation.”—Edmund Bertram in Mansfield Park Richard Newton’s “Clerical Alphabet” satirizes the English...
From: Jane Austen's World on 9 Jul 2020

The Yorkshire Little Man

For regular readers you may recall that we have written several articles about ‘dwarfs and giants’, John Coan, ‘The Norfolk Dwarf’ and at the other end of the height scale, Frances Flower, the ‘Nottinghamshire/Yorkshire Giantess’...
From: All Things Georgian on 8 Jul 2020

Joseph Longchamp of the Jockey Club

Let me introduce to three brothers, who I am fairly certain you will never have come across before and neither had I until by chance I came across Joseph Longchamp and of course, I was curious to know more about him. The only reference I had about him...
From: All Things Georgian on 1 Jul 2020

June 27

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “RUN AWAY … a NEGRO fellow, named July.” No newspaper advertisements concerning enslaved people appear via the Slavery Adverts 250 Project today, but that...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 27 Jun 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.