The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Georgian Theatre & Music"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Georgian Theatre & Music found 29 posts

Guest post by Alice McVeigh ‘Susan: A Jane Austen Prequel’

This week I am delighted to welcome another guest to All Things Georgian. Today’s guest is Alice McVeigh, a London ghost writer and professional cellist, who has spent over fifteen years performing with orchestras including the BBC Symphony and the...
From: All Things Georgian on 12 Jul 2021

John O’Keeffe (1747-1833), the blind playwright

I love introducing new guests to All Things Georgian and I’m excited to welcome Lynda O’Keeffe, researcher, writer and storyteller, today to tell us about John O’Keeffe (1747-1833), the blind playwright. As her name denotes, she is an ancestor...
From: All Things Georgian on 7 Jul 2021

18th Century Song, guest post by erAto

It’s always lovely to welcome guests to All Things Georgian and today I’m welcoming back the author, erAto who writes historic 18th century fiction, who will share with us information about 18th century songs. My Exenchester Series is a dark and...
From: All Things Georgian on 16 Jun 2021

George Bridgetower, violin virtuoso. Part Four

We have now reached the final part of the story and just in case you missed any, the previous parts can be found by clicking these links – Part 1, Part 2, Part 3. In this final part we return again to George and his wife Mary. In 1817 and they went...
From: All Things Georgian on 7 Oct 2020

George Bridgetower, violin virtuoso. Part Three

We begin the third part of George’s life in March 1794, but just in case you missed the earlier parts, click on the highlighted links to read part 1 and part two . George had been busy studying and performing at the New Theatre Royal, still under...
From: All Things Georgian on 30 Sep 2020

George Bridgetower, violin virtuoso. Part Two

Today we continue with the story of George’s life, but if you missed last weeks and would like to catch up, just click on this highlighted link. Charlotte Papendiek with her eldest son Frederick – a drawing by Thomas Lawrence, 1789, Metropolitan...
From: All Things Georgian on 23 Sep 2020

George Bridgetower, violin virtuoso. Part One

Over the next few weeks we are having a slight change to the usual weekly format in so much as I’m going to take a fairly detailed look at one person in particular and tell you a little about his life story and that of his family, so please do tune...
From: All Things Georgian on 16 Sep 2020

The Sussex Giantess – Jane Cobden

In the 18th and 19th centuries people were fascinated with people who were different in some way to the ‘average person’ and people such as the Sussex Giantess were bought by often unscrupulous people, to be on show for the paying public....
From: All Things Georgian on 9 Sep 2020

Edmund Keen (1787-1833), the Tragedian

We had thought about writing about his acting career, but we’re sure there are enough websites that provide all of that, so we decided to take a look at the man behind the theatre – if that’s at all possible. There has always been much...
From: All Things Georgian on 15 Oct 2019

The Rules of Bath

Richard ‘Beau’ Nash, dandy, Bath’s Master of Ceremonies and unofficial ‘king’ of the city was born in 1674. He set the rules by which Bath society regulated their days, and established it as a resort of fashion. You had to...
From: All Things Georgian on 10 Sep 2019

Harriette Wilson (1786-1845), courtesan, and her siblings

For anyone not familiar with Harriette Dubochet who used the assumed surname of Wilson whilst alive, (although when buried her baptismal name was given) we would definitely recommend both volumes of her memoirs published in 1825, as they make fascinating...
From: All Things Georgian on 23 Apr 2019

Third time lucky for the actress, Ann Street Barry (1733-1801)

Ann Street was born April 8th, 1733, the daughter of James Street, an eminent apothecary of Bath. Her brother William later became the mayor of Bath.  On March 17th, 1754 at Bedminster, Somerset Ann married the actor, William Dancer who, by all accounts...
From: All Things Georgian on 29 May 2018

Riot at the King’s Theatre in 1813

On Saturday 1st May 1813 at the King’s theatre a serious disturbance broke out, proceeding apparently a call from the audience for the reappearance of Madame Catalani, who had withdrawn her services from the theatre as they had not paid her monies...
From: All Things Georgian on 1 May 2018

Anne Catley – The Feisty Diva

Anne was born around 1745, one of two daughters born to Robert Catley and his wife Jane. Her younger sibling was Mary, also known as Polly. Family life was not easy, her father was a coachman, then publican of a tavern in Norwood, London. Her...
From: All Things Georgian on 5 Apr 2018

The Life of Actress, Mary Wells

Mary Stephens Davies was baptised on 14th December 1761 in the village of Little Haywood near Colwich, Staffordshire, the daughter of Thomas Davies and his wife, Anna. At the tender age of just six, Mary had visited the theatre for the first...
From: All Things Georgian on 22 Feb 2018

Richard Wroughton (1749-1822): Actor

In a previous blog post ‘Miss Jenny Davis as a bride’ we briefly mentioned Richard Wroughton, so thought we would take a closer look at him to see if we could find out anything more about his life. Richard Wroughton as Barnwell. courtesy of...
From: All Things Georgian on 25 Jan 2018

Frith Street, Soho: Mozart’s London Tour

One Wolfgang Mozart, a German Boy, of about eight Years old, is arrived here, who can play upon various sorts of Instruments of Music, in Concert, or Solo, and can compose Music surprisingly; so that he may be reckoned a Wonder at his Age. The Mozart...
From: All Things Georgian on 11 Jan 2018

Cuper’s Gardens, Lambeth’s pleasure ground

Cuper’s Gardens were described as a ‘scene of low dissipation… noted for its fireworks, and the great resort of the profligate of both sexes’. Opened in the late 17th century, they were pleasure gardens (and later a tea garden)...
From: All Things Georgian on 7 Dec 2017

The Jubilee: David Garrick’s ode to Shakespeare, 1769

As we recounted in our earlier blog about David Garrick’s Shakespeare Jubilee held over three days in September 1769, the all too typical British weather meant that the pageant which was to have been the grand finale of the event had to be cancelled....
From: All Things Georgian on 17 Oct 2017

Tom Weston of the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane

Alas! Poor Tom has tumbled off the perch, And left his gay Thalia in the lurch; Once high he stood upon the comic pinnacle, But when he slipp’d fell – Scrub – Sneak – Last – and Binnacle (Epitaph to Tom Weston) Thomas Weston...
From: All Things Georgian on 21 Sep 2017

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