The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Georgians"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Georgians found 48 posts

Thomas Ribright: The Electrifying Optician of 18th-century London.

Over the years I’m occasionally asked about historical heroes and villains and, in particular, who my ‘history hero’ would be. People are often surprised at my answer. My choice is neither famous nor celebrated…in fact it’s...
From: DrAlun on 1 Aug 2017

Gothic Revival: CRECS Tours Strawberry Hill House, 16 May 2017

Join the Cardiff Romanticism and Eighteenth-Century Seminar (CRECS) on 16 May 2017 for an exciting excursion, as we visit the Gothic Strawberry Hill House in Twickenham, a modern architectural marvel. With its arches and turrets, its elaborate windows...
From: CRECS// on 21 Apr 2017

Warehouses and Shopping in Georgian England

In recent years there has been a growing interest in the vibrant consumer culture of eighteenth-century Britain. Amanda Vickery has explored gendered consumption, and in particular the types of goods desired and bought by Georgian men and women. Jon Stobart,...
From: DrAlun on 8 Feb 2017

The New Female Coterie

We are delighted to welcome the Georgian Gentleman, aka Mike Rendell,  who like us, writes a blog about all things Georgian.  Mike’s book In bed with the Georgians: Sex Scandal & Satire in the 18th Century has just been published...
From: All Things Georgian on 17 Nov 2016

Report on Leverhulme Lecture by Tim Stretton: Stepmothers at Law in the Long 18th Century, 29 Feb 2016

CRECS was delighted to welcome Tim Stretton, Professor of History at St Mary’s University, Nova Scotia, for his Leverhulme Lecture on ‘Stepmothers at Law in the Long Eighteenth Century’. The concept of the ‘wicked stepmother’...
From: CRECS// on 13 Mar 2016

Our next event—Stepmothers at Law—is on tomorrow!

Filed under: Events, Speakers Tagged: eighteenth century, family, gender, Georgians, history, law, motherhood, sexuality, stepmothers
From: CRECS// on 28 Feb 2016

Leverhulme Lecture by Tim Stretton: Stepmothers at Law in the Long 18th Century, 29 Feb 2016

Stepmothers at Law in the Long Eighteenth Century Tim Stretton, Saint Mary’s University, Nova Scotia Leverhulme Trust Visiting Professor, Cardiff University A Leverhulme Lecture supported by the Cardiff Romanticism and Eighteenth-Century Seminar...
From: CRECS// on 31 Jan 2016

Visiting Speaker, 1 Dec 2015: Jennie Batchelor on The Lady’s Magazine

Jennie Batchelor (University of Kent) will be presenting her paper, ‘“The world is a large volume”: The Lady’s Magazine and Romantic Print Culture’, at 5.30pm on Tuesday, 1 December 2015. The talk will...
From: CRECS// on 26 Nov 2015

CONFERENCE REPORT: ‘Scandal and sociability: New perspectives on the Burney family’.

On September 1st, Cardiff University hosted the international symposium, ‘Scandal and Sociability: New Perspectives on the Burney Family’. Organizing this event was a high point of my first year in post at Cardiff. For years, I’ve been...
From: CRECS// on 12 Sep 2015

The Scandalous Lady W

I remember thoroughly enjoying Hallie Rubenhold’s brilliant The Scandalous Lady W (originally published in the UK as Lady Worsley’s Whim) when I read it several years ago and so was absolutely thrilled when I heard that not only was it going...
From: Madame Guillotine on 4 Sep 2015

Killing the King with Porter … part two.

My last post for the CRECs blog was about my very fun (and sometimes messy) experience of making a short film about the treason trials of the 1790s. I’m very excited to say that the film is now online. If you’ve ever wanted to know more about...
From: CRECS// on 17 Apr 2015

Brand new for BBC Arts: The Barbershop in the 18th century – presented by Dr Alun Withey

Click the link below and the programme should load in a separate window.Then, to play the programme, click the red square in the bottom left, or else you’ll be left with a massive image of me that doesn’t move…and that can’t be...
From: DrAlun on 1 Apr 2015

Report on How to Keep Your (Georgian) Man, 17 Mar 2015

There was an excellent turn out to this hotly awaited addition to the CRECS programme, which set out to explore the (fifty?) shades of grey that existed in eighteenth century attitudes to sex, gender and domesticity. Participants gathered around the tables...
From: CRECS// on 22 Mar 2015

Our next event—How to Keep Your (Georgian) Man—is on this Tuesday!

Filed under: Events Tagged: eighteenth century, Eliza Haywood, gender, Georgians, John Gregory, reading group, sexuality, William Hogarth
From: CRECS// on 16 Mar 2015

Next event—How to Keep Your (Georgian) Man, 17 Mar 2015

Our next CRECS event turns to the eternal question of sexuality, gender and domesticity in the eighteenth century. Christian Grey may be the man of the moment (unfortunately), but the Georgians had their own—characteristic, shall we say?—view of romance...
From: CRECS// on 15 Mar 2015

The Life and Times of Fanny Hill

In a week where everyone is talking about the release of the Fifty Shades of Grey film (did anyone actually like that book? I haven’t read any of them and have no plans to do so or to see the film but it seems to have inspired unmitigated loathing everywhere....
From: Madame Guillotine on 18 Feb 2015

Being Georgian at Kew Palace

This has been an amazing year for the Historic Royal Palaces thanks to the amazing events they have had going on to celebrate the 300th anniversary of the Hanoverian succession to the British throne upon the death of Queen Anne in 1714. I’ve been...
From: Madame Guillotine on 4 Sep 2014

A Georgian Day Out in Bath

As I’ve mentioned several times before on here, I am fortunate enough to live less than twenty minutes train journey away from Bath, that most revered and iconic bastion of Georgian elegance and although the town can get a bit much in the summer...
From: Madame Guillotine on 7 Aug 2014

Lover’s Eye Jewellery at Tatty Devine

Eye miniatures, early nineteenth century. Photo: Victoria and Albert Museum. As we all know, the eighteenth century was a bit of a heyday for weird, wonderful and often super creepy fashion from the amazingly funereal get ups of the Merveilleuses with...
From: Madame Guillotine on 5 Aug 2014

Making Fun of George Augustus Frederick, and other publishing matters

Last February I attended and spoke at a conference organised and funded by the VolkswagenStiftung. The conference  was hosted at the splendid Herrenhausen Palace in Hanover and it examined caricature during the personal union between England and Hanover...
From: cradledincaricature on 9 Jun 2014

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.