The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Germany"

Showing 1 - 20 of 127

Your search for posts with tags containing Germany found 127 posts

Repertory and Reputation at the Curtain

Adeola Ogunbadewa is a research intern at the School of English at the University of Kent, where she is going into her final year reading for a BA in Spanish and Religious Studies.  She has been working on a project to develop a timeline of...
From: Before Shakespeare on 20 Jul 2020

New Humanist: An Indifference of Birds by Richard Smyth

Every winter, white storks – so elegant in the air, so rickety on land – make the long flight south from Europe to what we assume to be ancestral wetlands in sub-Saharan Africa. At least, that’s what most of them do. These days there’s...
From: Mathew Lyons on 18 Jul 2020

What Goes Around Comes Around

The German city of Ulm in the 16th centuryGeorg Braun, Franz Hogenberg 1570-78(Click image to enlarge.)In the spring and summer of 1525, peasants and farmers throughout German speaking Europe staged a popular revolt now called the Deutscher Bauernkrieg....
From: Conciatore on 10 Jun 2020

George I: Murder, Marriage and Mayhem

I'm delighted to be visiting my esteemed publisher, Pen & Sword, to tell the story of the disastrous marriage of George I and Sophia Dorothea of Celle. When a loveless marriage erupted into violence and adultery, the stage was set for a scandal that...

Revisiting Erik Heinrichs’ The Live Chicken Treatment for Buboes: Trying a Plague Cure in Medieval and Early Modern Europe

Today we revisit a post originally published in 2017 by Erik Heinrichs on a seemingly odd treatment for plague buboes: the feathers from a chicken’s backside. Erik notes that there is a very long history of using chickens and chicken broths in medicine,...
From: The Recipes Project on 21 May 2020

New Intoxicants and Epidemics: Sugar and Tobacco in Hamburg’s Plague Medicine

In these trying times interest in past pestilences is booming, in particular in plague (and the Spanish flu), not least because there appear to be so many parallels between these diseases and COVID-19: home quarantine, face masks, and the Johns Hopkins...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 19 May 2020

After the Herero ‘Uprising’: Child Separation and Racial Apartheid in German Southwest Africa

By Adam A. Blackler Regimes seeking to exercise power over a segment of the population, past and present, have used child separation as a mechanism of social control. In a previously unknown collection at the National Archives of Namibia in Windhoek,...
From: Age of Revolutions on 30 Mar 2020

Tragedies of Pregnancy: Representation of Pregnancy in the Plays of German Writer Friedrich Hebbel (1813-1863)

The Perceptions of Pregnancy blog, like the Researchers’ Network, aims to reach beyond boundaries and borders and to facilitate an international and interdisciplinary conversation on pregnancy and its associated bodily and emotional experiences...
From: Perceptions of Pregnancy on 2 Mar 2020

A Matter of Measure: Tobacco in Seventeenth-Century German Satire

A German broadside published in 1658. Eight vignette etchings and a poem recount the story of tobacco’s arrival in Europe, and its ‘praiseworthy use by some German heroes/as well as the same’s real power and effect’. In the first...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 28 Feb 2020

Faking It? A Little History of Coffee Substitutes

Seas of rustic little-boy-blue flowers lining the paths stole the show on our summer wanderings through the rolling fields of Thuringia. I bored the kids as I analogously puzzled over its name. Was it a cornflower? Some kind of dandelion? A quick web...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 18 Nov 2019

What Goes Around Comes Around

The German city of Ulm in the 16th centuryGeorg Braun, Franz Hogenberg 1570-78(Click image to enlarge.)In the spring and summer of 1525, peasants and farmers throughout German speaking Europe staged a popular revolt now called the Deutscher Bauernkrieg....
From: Conciatore on 2 Aug 2019

The Braunschweig : A German-Flagged Ship on Lake Champlain, 1777?

“The Radeau was magnificently decked out today; from her two masts were flying the English flag and in honor of the nation of Braunschweig,... The post The <i>Braunschweig</i> : A German-Flagged Ship on Lake Champlain, 1777? appeared...

Winning the War with Eau de Cologne

By Jess Clark a part of the Perfumes Series In August 1914, Britain declared war on Germany. As many historians compellingly argue, the Great War was a point of major military, political, and socio-cultural disruption. This extended to commercial relationships...
From: The Recipes Project on 9 May 2019

A rose is a rose is a rose… but how does it smell?

By Galina Shyndriayeva as part of the Perfume Series Questions of words and the meanings they convey are critical for poetry and literature, but they are just as important in the poetry of the senses. While chemical knowledge seems to have little to do...
From: The Recipes Project on 7 May 2019

Shakespeare and the Europeans in Italy

Shakespeare and Italy Summer School With the equinox now passed and spring firmly under way here in the UK it’s time to look forward to the warmth of the summer. How better than to celebrate it with the charity Shakespeare in Italy’s wonderful...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 22 Mar 2019

Tales from the Archives: SNOWBALLS: INTERMIXING GENTILITY AND FRUGALITY IN NINETEENTH CENTURY BAKING

I recently spotted these “schneeballen”  at the bakery counter of my local supermarket. From Rothenburg ob der Tauber in Bavaria, these delicious cookies are actually made from strips of shortcrust pastry, draped over a wooden stick...
From: The Recipes Project on 27 Dec 2018

What Goes Around Comes Around

The German city of Ulm in the 16th centuryGeorg Braun, Franz Hogenberg 1570-78(Click image to enlarge.)In the spring and summer of 1525, peasants and farmers throughout German speaking Europe staged a popular revolt now called the Deutscher Bauernkrieg....
From: Conciatore on 12 Nov 2018

Instruments or hands? ‘Nature’ and the practice of obstetric surgeons in early eighteenth-century Germany

If you wanted to edify yourself in 1790s Germany on the history of midwifery, you might have consulted J. G. Krünitz’s Oekonomische Encyklopädie (published 1773–1858), the most comprehensive German-language encyclopaedia of its time,...
From: Perceptions of Pregnancy on 15 May 2018

Lektueretagung der Spinoza-Gesellschaft

Lektüretagung Spinoza Ethica II Programm  Lektüretagung der Spinoza-Gesellschaft 22. – 24. Juni 2018 Leucorea Wittenberg Spinoza: Ethik, Teil 2: Über die Natur und den Ursprung des Geistes.  Mit einem Abendvortrag von J....
From: Spinoza Research Network on 27 Apr 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.