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Search Results for "Growth"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Growth found 25 posts

Call for papers: Big counterfactuals of macro-political history

Conference to be held at the University of Manchester Part of the CEPR Economic History programme With generous support from the Hallsworth Conference Fund, University of Manchester Date: Friday March 24, 2023 Note: This conference is expected...
From: Economic Growth in History on 23 Jun 2022

Conference program: Early modern science, technology, and institutions

Here’s the program for this conference, previously announced as a call for papers here. The program below is preliminary and subject to change. Check this website for the latest updates. University of Manchester Date: May 13, 2022 Conference...
From: Economic Growth in History on 8 Apr 2022

Call for papers: Economic Consequences of the Age of Liberal Revolutions, 1810-1848

Conference to be held at the Instituto de Ciências Sociais, Universidade de Lisboa Date: September 23, 2022 Conference title: Economic Consequences of the Age of Liberal Revolutions: 1810-48 Location: Instituto de Ciências Sociais,...
From: Economic Growth in History on 11 Mar 2022

Royal Economic Society 2020 Annual Conference, University of Manchester hub (theme: Economic Growth)

Royal Economic Society 2020 Annual Conference, University of Manchester hub (theme: Economic Growth) Tuesday 12 April, 2022 12.30 – 13.30 Buffet lunch, provisionally for 100 people, Foyer Space in Mansfield Cooper 13:30 – 15.00 Keynote Oded...
From: Economic Growth in History on 8 Mar 2022

American treasure and the decline of Spain

Let London manufacture those fine fabrics of hers to her heart’s content; Holland her chambrays; Florence her cloth … Milan her brocades, Italy and Flanders their linens … so long as our capital can enjoy them; the only thing it proves is that all...
From: Economic Growth in History on 24 Jan 2022

The Value of Political Connections: Evidence from China’s Anti-Corruption Campaign

This paper (written by Marta Alonso, Beatriz Simón Yarza and me), also available as a CEPR discussion paper, is now forthcoming at the Journal of Institutional Economics. Abstract: We study the value of the political connections of directors on...
From: Economic Growth in History on 23 Dec 2021

Call for papers: Early modern science, technology, and institutions

The University of Manchester Conference to be held at the University of Manchester Date: May 13, 2022 Conference title: Early modern science, technology, and institutions Keynote speakers: Debin Ma (University of Oxford) and David...
From: Economic Growth in History on 13 Oct 2021

Stunting and wasting in a growing economy

A new paper is out, with the title “Stunting and wasting in a growing economy: Biological living standards in Portugal, 1924-1994”. You can find the CEPR (gated) version here, and an open access version here. In this paper, we document the remarkable...
From: Economic Growth in History on 7 Oct 2021

Was Portugal’s growth miracle (c. 1950-1973) due to the exploitation of Africa?

It is commonly heard in Portugal today that if the country converged during Estado Novo’s dictatorship it was because of exploitation of Africa. This claim has become louder recently, in the wake of a series of polemics in the media involving me. In...
From: Economic Growth in History on 8 Aug 2021

Historical gender discrimination does not explain comparative Western European development

Historical gender discrimination does not explain comparative Western European development: This is what we argue in a new paper (joint work with Jaime Reis and Lisbeth Rodrigues). Also available as a CEPR discussion paper. Here’s the abstract:...
From: Economic Growth in History on 24 Mar 2021

Slavery delayed the industrialization of Brazil

Slavery in Brazil was only abolished in 1888. In a new paper we consider the relationship between slavery and development in 19th c. Brazil. The paper is forthcoming in Capitalism: A Journal of History and Economics. We show that despite its centrality,...
From: Economic Growth in History on 3 Feb 2021

Why did Latin America fall behind and what explains its human geography?

Leticia Abad and I recently released a new paper, avaliable here, and which is going to be published as a chapter in an edited volume, Globalization and the Early Modern Era: An Iberian Perspective (eds. R. Doblado and A. Garcia-Hiernaux), Palgrave (forthcoming...
From: Economic Growth in History on 14 May 2020

Big debates and economic history: the case of World War II

Economic history matters for big debates. This can be true of even historical national accounting work which to some observers can appear to be as dry a topic as any can be. Here’s an example of why it matters. In this interview with Tyler Cowen,...
From: Economic Growth in History on 11 May 2020

“Standards of living in Europe’s Global Empires” session in the WEHC, Paris 2021

This session has been accepted to the World Economic History Conference, which will happen in Paris in 2021. Session title: “Standards of living in Europe’s Global Empires” Organizer: Nuno Palma (University of Manchester; ICS, Univ....
From: Economic Growth in History on 2 Mar 2020

Patterns of Iberian Growth in the Early Modern Period

New working paper: Patterns of Iberian Growth in the Early Modern Period, by myself and Carlos Santiago-Caballero. This corresponds to a book chapter which will come out in a Cambridge University Press book, An Economic History of the Iberian Peninsula,...
From: Economic Growth in History on 20 Nov 2019

Comparative European Institutions and the Little Divergence, 1385-18

The Spanish Black legend (leyenda negra) survives. Let’s destroy it (well, part of it). In a new paper we show that English institutional divergence relative to the Iberian kingdoms started in the mid-seventeenth century, but not before. Iberian...
From: Economic Growth in History on 28 Aug 2019

On the discrepancies between the original Maddison dataset and more recent GDP reconstructions

Angus Maddison was one of the most cited economists of the 20th century. I often get emails asking me about Maddison’s figures, because I have worked a lot on historical national accounts reconstructions (see here, here, or here), and I was for...
From: Economic Growth in History on 27 May 2019

Money and Modernization in Early Modern England (forthcoming at the Financial History Review)

In early modern England, coin supply increased a lot without prices responding proportionally: This contradicts the Quantity Theory of Money, according to which the changes should move together. If the money supply doubles, prices should double too,...
From: Economic Growth in History on 7 Feb 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.