The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Guest Post"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Guest Post found 228 posts

The Soldier of Christ in Medieval Hagiography

How did the figure of the milites – the sanctified warrior laymen of the church – grow out of medieval saints’ lives? In her new article (now live on the Cerae website), Sofia Fagiolo tackles this question through the lens of two...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 4 Apr 2020

Walking into mythology

How fluid is Icelandic place-lore; how do medieval narratives relate to modern folklore and local landscapes? These are just some of the questions Matthias Egeler explores in his new article (now live on the Cerae website). In this accompanying blog-post,...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 29 Mar 2020

Pass Ye Remote: A Quest for Early Modern Entertainment Through Online Learning Resources — Before Shakespeare

Welcome to Elizabethan England via the digital world! We’re lucky to have a range of exciting and innovative online resources at our disposal that make it possible to explore the entertainment and cultural activities of early modern England through...
From: Middling Culture on 23 Mar 2020

Catastrophe, cultural memory, and the ‘dust veil’ of 536

What can Old Norse accounts of Fimbulvetr (‘Great Winter’) tell us about cultural memory of the ‘dust veil’ of  536 throughout Europe? In his new article (now live on the Cerae website), Andrea Maraschi explores just...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 21 Mar 2020

Intoxicating Pharmacies? Apothecary Shops and New Intoxicants in Amsterdam, 1600–185

Thinking about intoxicating spaces, apothecary shops are probably not what first springs to mind. Yet, these places are very relevant in discussing the assimilation of new intoxicants into European diets. It may seem strange to us today, but they virtually...
From: Intoxicating Spaces on 6 Mar 2020

Sarah Worral Grazebrook

Guest PostConciatore is very pleased to present a guest post by Dr. Kate Round in which she acquaints us with the owner operator of the Audnam Glassworks in the mid 1700s. Sarah Worral Grazebrook 1721-99by Kate RoundAfter reading of Sara Vincx who in...
From: Conciatore on 6 Mar 2020

The Furniture of the Middling Sort

Many thanks to Chris Pickvance for this guest post on the furniture of the middling sort. You can hear Chris talk the team through a “middling” style chair in the video at the end of this post… You can also read more about furniture...
From: Middling Culture on 7 Jan 2020

Guest Post

Conciatore is very pleased to present a guest post by Dr. Kate Round in which she acquaints us with the owner operator of the Audnam Glassworks in the mid 1700s. Sarah Worral Grazebrook 1721-99by Kate RoundAfter reading of Sara Vincx who in 1595, following...
From: Conciatore on 11 Nov 2019

Sir Joseph Banks and the Medieval Icelandic Saga

In this article, our social media editor Matt Firth looks at the career of Joseph Banks (1743-1820), and the collection of Icelandic texts he left the British Library… For Australians, Joseph Banks (1743-1820) is a familiar name from our colonial...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 30 Oct 2019

Epidemic: Were the Powers that Be Powerless to Prevent the Plague?: A Guest Post by Claire Canary

One of the many things to really slow me down in writing historical fiction is the level of interest I’ve taken in my research. Nevertheless, it’s been the best learning experience of my life! Thanks to works such as Rebecca Rideal’s...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 26 Sep 2019

Witches at Night: Creative Responses to Early Modern Witch Trials

In the 1613 pamphlet Witches Apprehended, Examined and Executed, a servant gossips about a local woman he believes to be a witch. As he speaks, he is struck by a […]
From: Inner Lives on 16 Sep 2019

"Writing About the Romanovs": Guest Post by Gill Paul, Author of THE LOST DAUGHTER

I'm excited to welcome Gill Paul to the blog today to talk about her latest novel, THE LOST DAUGHTER, recently released from William Morrow. I'm about a hundred pages in, and can assure you that this is a story you won't want to miss! A dual-timeline...
From: Writing the Renaissance on 5 Sep 2019

THE BRIDGWATER CORPORATION PEW c. 16

We thank Susan Orlik for this guest post on the Bridgwater Corporation Pew: If you had been sitting in the congregation on a Sunday in the early seventeenth century in St Mary’s church, in the centre of Bridgwater, Somerset, your line of sight...
From: Middling Culture on 3 Sep 2019

Dress Hooks of the Middling Sort

We are grateful to Michael Lewis, Head of Portable Antiquities & Treasure at the British Museum, for this guest post on “dress hooks.” Identifying the ‘middling sort’ through their material culture is fraught with difficulties,...
From: Middling Culture on 14 Aug 2019

A Treasury of Early Irish Literature – BL Manuscript Egerton 178

In this article, our editor Christina Cleary takes a look at BL MS Egerton 1782, a 16th century Irish manuscript that preserves Early Irish tales that have not otherwise survived the centuries… The vellum manuscript known as Egerton 1782, housed...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 11 Aug 2019

La Rochelle and the Roman de Melusine

In this article, our deputy reviews editor Kirsty Bolton takes a look at the medieval port town of La Rochelle, its legendary founder, and its fraught political history… In June, I spent a few days in La Rochelle, a medieval port town...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 28 Jul 2019

Rudolf II and the Material Culture of the Holy Roman Empire

How did an emperor’s interest in collecting art connect with representations of his cultural and imperial legacy? In her new article (now live on the Cerae website), Miranda Lee Elston explores Rudolf II’s fascination with the religious...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 12 Jun 2019

Reading Sallust in Medieval Political and Intellectual Culture

How was the classical historian Sallust read in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, and what does this reveal about medieval moral thought? These are the questions Philippa Byrne asks in her new article (now live on the Cerae website). Philippa introduces...
From: CERAE Impressions: A Blog on 23 May 2019

Nordic Noir: Creating Denmark’s First Museum of Witchcraft

In December 2018 a small group from the Museum of Southwest Jutland in Denmark, consisting of Lulu Anne Hansen (Head of Historical Research), Mette Slyngborg (Curator), Louise Lindgaard (Research Assistant), […]
From: Inner Lives on 14 May 2019

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.