The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Gypsies"

Your search for posts with tags containing Gypsies found 17 posts

Francis Blake Delaval, The Prankster

On August 6th, 1724 at St Ann’s Soho, Captain Francis Blake Delaval of Seaton Delaval Hall, near Newcastle Upon Tyne, married Rhoda Apreece, the heiress of Doddington Hall, which is somewhere we have previously written about. Rhoda Apreece (d.1759),...
From: All Things Georgian on 18 Jul 2019

Banished to New York: Seven Gypsies in 1682 #History #Scotland

Scotland had draconian laws against travelling folk. Hostility towards “Egyptians” took off under King James VI, who was also famously opposed to Border Reivers, Gaelic-speaking Highlanders, alleged Witches, Protestant religious dissenters...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 10 Jan 2018

Mrs Bridget the Norwood Gipsey

We came across a book written in 1790 entitled The Universal Fortune Teller and concerning a gypsy, Mother Bridget of Norwood, one of the infamous Norwood gypsies who died in 1768. The Norwood gypsies lived in the area now known as Gypsy Hill. The...
From: All Things Georgian on 12 Jan 2017

Princess Victoria and the gypsies, part

We’re delighted that you have joined us for the second part of this post. So, following on from part 1 we have managed to tease out a whole list of names that Princess Victoria was given by the gypsies she met at Claremont, so we wanted to explore...
From: All Things Georgian on 8 Dec 2016

Princess Victoria and the gypsies, part 1

So far we have written several pieces about Romany gypsies as their stories have popped up during our research and for anyone who reads our latest book, A Right Royal Scandal, you will find out more about our interest in this community. In this, the first...
From: All Things Georgian on 6 Dec 2016

A Gypsy Romance

Major Boswell was a gypsy – he was born in 1780, and baptized on the 6th August, in the Oxfordshire village of Bloxham where he was recorded as the son of John Boswell. A noted fiddler, as a young man he earned his living by playing at different...
From: All Things Georgian on 19 Jan 2016

Capturing the Flag: How Gypsies in the Scots Army settled at Kirk Yetholm in 1695 #History #Scotland

The Siege of Namur in 1685 In April, 1689, William Bennet, younger, of Grubbet and Henry Erskine, Lord Cardross, both raised troops to defend the Revolution that settled William of Orange as King of Scots. Bennet became captain of a troop of fifty horse...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 12 Jan 2016

Norman Cross: French Prisoner of War Camp

In the December of 1796 work began on building a prisoner of war camp at Norman Cross on the border between Huntingdonshire and Leicestershire. Built to house French prisoners of war, it was the first such purpose built camp anywhere in the world. Bird’s...
From: All Things Georgian on 1 Dec 2015

A gypsy named James Venus

The Boss family, notorious gypsy horse thieves and dealers, plied their dubious trade across throughout Norfolk and Suffolk, into Northamptonshire and Lincolnshire and further afield into Yorkshire. The family used various aliases, including Heron (Hearne)...
From: All Things Georgian on 28 Jul 2015

The Murderous Tale behind Tom Otter’s Lane

A rural, country lane in Lincolnshire, between the villages of Drinsey Nook and Saxilby and close to the county border with Nottinghamshire, bears the name of a murderer who was gibbeted there for his crime.   Tom Otter’s Lane, showing the...
From: All Things Georgian on 28 Apr 2015

The Gypsies’ Field of Blood at Romanno, 1677

On 1 October, 1677, a ‘battle’ between gypsies took place near Romanno Bridge in Peeblesshire. Five men were later hanged in Edinburgh’s Grassmarket in connection with the battle. Their story then takes a bizarre turn that could almost come straight...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 15 Mar 2015

Under the canopy of heaven: A Gypsy’s winter birth in Lincolnshire, 1820

When you picture gypsies of the past, do you picture them travelling in their gaudily painted horse-drawn caravans or vardo’s?  In truth, this form of transport is a relatively modern invention, and the gypsy people generally sheltered in ‘bender’...
From: All Things Georgian on 20 Jan 2015

Cornelius Blewitt was a Gipsy: the end of his life in a Lincolnshire village in 1786

    In January 1786, in a small rural Lincolnshire village, an elderly gypsy died. Cornelius Blewitt was no ordinary gypsy though, he was a King of the Gypsies, and he was still remembered at the dawn of the 19th century. We think it is fitting...
From: All Things Georgian on 20 Aug 2014

‘Her Vagrant Majesty’ of Puddletown, Dorset

Puddletown, Dorset     Sporting Magazine, volume 21 dated 1803 reported:- ‘A short time since, the youngest son of the late Peter Stanley, commonly known by the appellation of King of the Gypsies, started from the town-pump in...
From: All Things Georgian on 14 Aug 2014

The Life and Adventures of Bampfylde Moore Carew (1690-1758)

    One of our readers last week mentioned the somewhat larger than life Georgian character of Bampfylde Moore Carew via some feedback on our Gypsies of Georgian England article and we decided to see whether we could actually find any new information...
From: All Things Georgian on 24 Jul 2014

The Case of the Misjudged Gypsies

In our earlier post about  the gypsies of Georgian England we said that we would revisit the topic and today we have decided to look at one example of the prejudice this group of people suffered.     travelling gypsy When Elizabeth Mary...
From: All Things Georgian on 15 Jul 2014

Egyptian Astrologers and the Prognostic Marketplace

The gypsy lady astrologer from Alexandria in Egypt, Sibylla Ptolomaein, shows the tools of her trade, including celestial globe and sextant, and its products: a nativity chart (also known as horoscope) and symbols commonly used in astrological calendars....
From: PRAELUDIA MICROCOSMICA on 7 Oct 2013

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.