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Your search for posts with tags containing HBO found 70 posts

How Natty Martyn Grew Up

Last September, we got a passing glimpse of fifteen-year-old Natty Martyn, youngest son of the minister in Northborough in 1756. Natty had a bad sore, and his family had begun to despair for him. The Rev. John Martyn took his son to Dr. Ebenezer Dexter...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Jan 2021

Ranking American Revolution Films and Television

Given movies and television are the great American art form, the American Revolution has been poorly served by filmmakers. Though it was one of... The post Ranking American Revolution Films and Television appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Assault on a “young lad” in Marlborough

Now to get back to events in Marlborough in July 1770.Back here I quoted a letter published in the Boston Gazette on 30 July 1770, describing an effigy of local merchant Henry Barnes on horseback. And here I quoted the part of that article discussing...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Jul 2020

When Balch Came Back

In early October 1775, Nathaniel Balch the hatter left London and sailed back home to America.On 23 December, the Providence Gazette reported on news from the preceding days:Captain Gorham is arrived at Nantucket from London, after a Passage of eleven...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Dec 2019

Sir Philip Sidney, The Countess of Pembroke’s Arcadia (1674)

By Maria Cunningham, Head of Special Collections and Archives, Reed College This is the thirteenth edition of The Countess of Pembroke’s Arcadia (simply known as the Arcadia) and was first written by Sir Phillip Sidney towards the end of the 16th...

Another Mystery of Nero Faneuil

The likelihood that George Washington’s cook Hercules took his first owner’s surname and went by Hercules Posey in New York brought back thoughts about how another black man might have negotiated slavery and freedom in the early republic.Last...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Mar 2019

More of Mary Clapham’s Massacre Memorials

In the early 1770s, Mary Clapham managed the Royal Exchange tavern on King Street, near the center of Boston.In this 1801 view of State Street, as it was renamed, the tall white building was the one that housed the tavern. The Boston Massacre had taken...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Mar 2019

“If I would go with them to commit this Robery”

As I said yesterday, the only reason we know more than perfunctory details about the trial of two men for stealing a chest from James Lovell in 1784 is because Massachusetts attorney general Robert Treat Paine took notes.Those notes aren’t word-for-word...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Mar 2019

The Trial of Nero Faneuil

Nero Faneuil was a black man who petitioned for an end to slavery in Massachusetts in 1777, as quoted here. It’s unclear whether he was enslaved at the time or advocating for the many other people who were.Seven years later, Nero Faneuil (his surname...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 Mar 2019

Gun Cleaning. A personal Point Of View.

This post has been prompted by several posts on forums concerning the problems people are having with gun cleaning. Principally the cleaning of the barrel.All of the problems I have read about to date, to my thinking, seems to come from the use of modern...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 8 Dec 2018

More Documentation on the use of Wads or Wadding with Round ball in Smoothbores.

Round Ball & Wads or Wadding.“ I slipped a boullet upon the shot and beate the paper into my gunne."Voyages of Peter Esprit Radisson 1636-1710.  Being an account of his travels and experiences among the North American Indians,...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 17 Nov 2018

A Few Words About Smoothbores.

In the 18th century smoothbores did NOT use a patched ball, the ball was loaded in the same way as using shot, with wads or wadding.An Essay On Shooting 1789.
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 16 Nov 2018

What is the best audiovisual material to teach students about the American Revolution or Founding Era?

One of our readers, an educator, asked the JAR editors a question that we chose to put before our contributors: What is the best... The post What is the best audiovisual material to teach students about the American Revolution or Founding Era? appeared...

The Bewitched Wife’s Cure

Since it is Hallowe’en, in this post we look at how bodily waste: urine, hair, and nail clippings were common ingredients in spells, charms against something, and also in spells to remove other spells. V0025811ETC Witchcraft: a white-faced witch...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 31 Oct 2018

Sketchbook chronicling a tour along the Rhine by an English traveler and draughtsman

Album of 20 leaves (of which 3 are double leaves) of pencil, sepia and black ink sketches, some with wash, of Rhine landscape and town views, as well as 2 colour wash sketches, and a few pencil sketches (one with wash), most captioned in manuscript. The...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 2 Apr 2018

Orations at Old South, 21 Mar.

On Wednesday, 21 March, the Old South Meeting House will host “Speak Out!”, its fourth annual remembrance of the Boston Massacre orations.From 1771 to 1783, Boston had a yearly town meeting to commemorate the fatal violence on King Street....
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Mar 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.