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Search Results for "Hardwick"

Your search for posts with tags containing Hardwick found 17 posts

Timothy Ruggles Makes His Case

I’m going to jump ahead of the sestercentennial anniversaries to finish the story of Timothy Ruggles’s refusal to sign the results of the Stamp Act Congress he had presided over.In 1766, the Massachusetts House demanded to know what Ruggles...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Oct 2015

The cook’s book, Hardwicke House

Household accounts book for Hardwicke House on the banks of the river Thames in Oxfordshire includes itemized payments to kitchen staff as well as lists of ingredients and the quantities purchased. The household employed two cooks during this period;...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 25 Aug 2014

‘Ann Radcliffe at 250’: A Retrospective

Over the weekend I was lucky enough to attend ‘Radcliffe at 250’, an international conference hosted by the University of Sheffield. The conference (which was co-organised by Angela Wright, Joe Bray, Maddy Callaghan, Andrew Smith and Dale...

Who Do You Think You Are, Bishop Richard Hurd?

The Hurd Library has a very nice collection of books, but it also holds a variety of papers connected with Bishop Richard Hurd and his nephew, another Richard Hurd — whom we generally call Richard Hurd Junior, but because that’s a bit of a...
From: The Hurd Library on 10 Oct 2013

Exploring Bess of Hardwick’s letters

As mentioned in a previous post, several online finding aids for manuscript collections at the Folger now include links to digital images of the documents, providing another avenue of access to both onsite and offsite researchers. Finding aids provide...
From: The Collation on 25 Sep 2013

An Interview with Jan Garside

Jan Garside, a textile artist, recently completed a set of three responses to our research and to the ‘Virtue and Vice’ exhibition at Hardwick Hall. A couple of weeks ago, I sat down with Jan to talk through her inspiration and the challenges...

Weaving histories: contemporary textiles at Hardwick Hall

Yesterday, I made another trip to Hardwick Hall to help (well, mainly watch) textile artist Jan Garside and her collaborators install a set of three responses to our research, and to the themes of the ‘Virtue and Vice’ exhibition. Jan’s...

Picture of a reading table?

A couple of days ago, I wrote a post about Bess of Hardwick’s reading. What I didn’t mention there was the description of the table on which Bess kept her books. According to the 1601 inventory of Hardwick, Bess’s books sat in her bedchamber,...

A book that converted…

As part of the work of putting together the ‘Virtue and Vice’ exhibition, I got to return to a question that has fascinated me for a long time: women’s reading in the early modern period. Though moralists fulminated against the perils...

On the road: travelling and communicating with Shakespeare

Of all the times for it to happen, on the day Andy Murray won Wimbledon my broadband connection failed, finally coming back to life about half an hour after he raised that trophy. I was painfully aware, all day, of how pathetically reliant I’ve...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 8 Jul 2013

A Brief History of Old Men (and Women) Part Two: Blind Doges and Old Besses

In Part 1 I had begun an attempted anecdotal slaying of a personal bugbear- the popular perception, (wilfully propagated by the BBC), that anyone approaching that age loosely called average life expectancy was nearing the end of their natural term. My...
From: The Eagle Clawed Wolfe on 19 May 2013

An inlaid table, as you’ve never heard it before…

On 13th April 2013, visitors to the High Great Chamber at Hardwick Hall were in for a surpise… ‘Les Canards Chantants’, a talented quartet currently based in York, delighted visitors by singing ‘live’ from the Eglantine...

Happy Birthday to the Bard

It’s Shakespeare’s birthday. To celebrate as Shakespeare would have liked, make sure you contemplate your own advancing age by listening to Izzy Isgate reading Sonnet 73. Simply click on the link below to listen. Download: sonnet-73.m4a Empty...

How do you solve a problem like Hardwick?

It’s been a privilege to work with National Trust staff and volunteers for the ‘Virtue and Vice’ exhibition, and a real thrill to get the occasional peek into areas of the Hall that are usually closed to visitors – including the...

What’s in a Name? Curating ‘Virtue and Vice’

The first of the four rare painted hangings in the Hardwick Chapel which inspired our exhibition. ©NTPL/John Hammond. On a visit to Hardwick in the summer of 2011, I encountered two striking textiles. One was a magnificent appliqué hanging depicting...

Reflections of an intern: creating the Virtue & Vice app

There are days to go until the opening of the exhibition “Virtue & Vice” at Hardwick Hall. This will coincide with the availability of an accompanying app for Apple and Android smartphones. This aspect of the project has been a real departure...

Reflections of an Intern: Greetings!

Hello! My name’s Hannah, and I have been the “intern” for the Conversion Narratives project for about six weeks. I’ll be posting to the blog every so often in order to offer up my reflections on aspects of the project, plus any thoughts...

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.