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Your search for posts with tags containing Helen Smith found 21 posts

Book Chapters: Graizbord & Lehfeldt in “Conversions”

Simon Ditchfield and Helen Smith, eds. Conversions: Gender and Religious Change in Early Modern Europe (Manchester University Press, 2017. David Graizbord, “The quiet conversion of a ‘Jewish’ woman in eighteenthcentury Spain.”...
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 9 Oct 2018

Chapters in “Conversions: Gender & Religious Change in Early Modern Europe”

Simon Ditchfield and Helen Smith, eds, Conversions: Gender and Religious Change in Early Modern Europe (Manchester University Press, 2017). 2 The quiet conversion of a ‘Jewish’ woman in eighteenth century Spain – David Graizbord 6 Uneven...
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 8 Feb 2017

Dunnottar Prisoners Attempting to Escape at Leith are put in Irons #History #Scotland

On 31 October, 1685, nineteen prisoners, some of whom were suspected of attempting to escape from Leith Tolbooth, were brought to Edinburgh Tolbooth and put in irons. What makes the list intriguing is that most of the prisoners from Leith had previously...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 30 Nov 2016

Printing and publishing in Shakespeare’s world

The title-page of Alvearie A couple of weeks go I heard an interview with an author who had tracked down the people who had pre-owned some of his books. It sparked a discussion about writing in books, from a simple signature of ownership, to an inscription...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 14 Nov 2014

‘Converted to a cat’

The most famous apocyrphal cat of the Renaissance?**Petrarch’s mummified cat at Casa del Petrarca. In honour of World Cat Day, I did a quick search on the fabulous Early English Books Online to see if cats were ever described as agents of conversion,...

An Interview with Jan Garside

Jan Garside, a textile artist, recently completed a set of three responses to our research and to the ‘Virtue and Vice’ exhibition at Hardwick Hall. A couple of weeks ago, I sat down with Jan to talk through her inspiration and the challenges...

Weaving histories: contemporary textiles at Hardwick Hall

Yesterday, I made another trip to Hardwick Hall to help (well, mainly watch) textile artist Jan Garside and her collaborators install a set of three responses to our research, and to the themes of the ‘Virtue and Vice’ exhibition. Jan’s...

‘Go your ways for an Apostata’: the converting Courtesan

van Honthorst, Smiling Girl, a Courtesan, Holding an Obscene Image, 1625 I’m really delighted to have been given the chance to contribute to the Dutch Courtesan project, an all-singing, all-dancing (and all-acting) web resource that has accompanied...

Picture of a reading table?

A couple of days ago, I wrote a post about Bess of Hardwick’s reading. What I didn’t mention there was the description of the table on which Bess kept her books. According to the 1601 inventory of Hardwick, Bess’s books sat in her bedchamber,...

A book that converted…

As part of the work of putting together the ‘Virtue and Vice’ exhibition, I got to return to a question that has fascinated me for a long time: women’s reading in the early modern period. Though moralists fulminated against the perils...

Paper, Making, Things

Michelle Wallis reports on another session at Things. You can read the storify of the tweets here, and listen to the podcast here. — One of the main aims of the ‘Things’ seminar is to invite scholars to think beyond the textual remains of the...
From: Things on 28 May 2013

An inlaid table, as you’ve never heard it before…

On 13th April 2013, visitors to the High Great Chamber at Hardwick Hall were in for a surpise… ‘Les Canards Chantants’, a talented quartet currently based in York, delighted visitors by singing ‘live’ from the Eglantine...

Happy Birthday to the Bard

It’s Shakespeare’s birthday. To celebrate as Shakespeare would have liked, make sure you contemplate your own advancing age by listening to Izzy Isgate reading Sonnet 73. Simply click on the link below to listen. Download: sonnet-73.m4a Empty...

How do you solve a problem like Hardwick?

It’s been a privilege to work with National Trust staff and volunteers for the ‘Virtue and Vice’ exhibition, and a real thrill to get the occasional peek into areas of the Hall that are usually closed to visitors – including the...

What’s in a Name? Curating ‘Virtue and Vice’

The first of the four rare painted hangings in the Hardwick Chapel which inspired our exhibition. ©NTPL/John Hammond. On a visit to Hardwick in the summer of 2011, I encountered two striking textiles. One was a magnificent appliqué hanging depicting...

‘This chocolatical confection…’

A world of chocolate: Sophie’s map included tea, coffee, chocolate, and sugar to remind us that these ‘new world’ products transformed the habits of old Europe. What better way to mark the first of our public lecture series, ‘Cultural...

Word of the Day: Pisteology

This one is borrowed directly from the Oxford English Dictionary, which today informs us that Pisteology is ‘A theory or science of faith’. From the few citations given by the dictionary, it seems a) that it didn’t really catch on (one...

Fingers and Mirrors: Caravaggio and the Conversion of Mary Magdalene in Renaissance Rome

Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio, Martha and Mary Magdalene, c. 1598. Detroit Institute of Arts, 73.268. When the Conversion Narratives team went to Fort Worth, Texas for the Sixteenth-Century Studies conference in October last year, we were lucky enough...

Cultural Encounters: Jesus and Jerusalem in the Mughal Court

Searching the V&A catalogue, I stumbled across this fabulous image. It is a characteristically refined and naturalistic painting done by an unknown artist at the Mughal royal court, probably between 1600 and 1610. The Mughal Empire stretched across...

Kathleen Lynch, Protestant Autobiography in the Seventeenth-Century Anglophone World

Kathleen Lynch’s Protestant Autobiography in the Seventeenth-Century Anglophone World, published by Oxford University Press earlier this year, is a major new study of early modern spiritual autobiography, with a particular emphasis upon the testimonies...

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