The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Henry Knox"

Showing 1 - 20 of 55

Your search for posts with tags containing Henry Knox found 55 posts

Capt. David Bradlee, Wine-Merchant

If there’s not enough evidence to say David Bradlee participated in the Boston Tea Party of 1773, I don’t know what he did between the collapse of George Gailer’s lawsuit in late 1771 and the start of the war.When Bradlee resurfaces...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Nov 2019

The Officers’ Spirited Memorial: A Prelude to the Newburgh Conspiracy

The officers of the Continental Army were sullen. It was December 1782, and they were stationed in and around Newburgh, New York, and neighboring... The post The Officers’ Spirited Memorial: A Prelude to the Newburgh Conspiracy appeared first on...

Catharine Macaulay’s Difficult Years, 1778–1787

Between 1775 and 1784 Catharine Macaulay’s social and personal life was one traumatic event after another. She accepted the invitation from Rev. Dr. James... The post Catharine Macaulay’s Difficult Years, 1778–1787 appeared first on...

Three Revolutionary War Symposia in Three Weekends

Three Revolutionary War symposia are happening on successive weekends this fall, so it’s time to pick and prepare.On 20-22 September, Fort Ticonderoga in upstate New York will host its sixteenth Annual Seminar on the American Revolution. The speakers...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Jul 2019

Captain Sepitmus Noel: Ordnance Fleet Commodore

History occasionally provides a pleasant surprise by revealing the record of an ordinary person who, thrust into a unique role, performed extraordinary services for... The post Captain Sepitmus Noel: Ordnance Fleet Commodore appeared first on Journal...

Henry Knox’s “Noble Train of Artillery:” No Ox for Kno

The best-known scene of Col. Henry Knox’s train of artillery in the winter of 1775-1776 is Tom Lovell’s painting The Noble Train of Artillery.... The post Henry Knox’s “Noble Train of Artillery:” No Ox for Knox appeared first...

Speakers at 2019 Revolutionary War Conferences

Here are the line-ups of speakers and topics at two conferences on the Revolutionary War coming later this year.Though some of the speakers are academics and they’re presenting high-quality research, these aren’t academic gatherings. The focus...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Jan 2019

“An Officer carried a manuscript to Henry Knox”

I step away from The Saga of the Brazen Head at a moment of calamity to consider a passage in merchant John Andrews’s letter to a Philadelphia relative on 15 Jan 1775:A few days since an Officer carried a manuscript to Henry Knox for him to publish;...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Jan 2019

Christmas Night, 1776: How Did They Cross?

When the two columns of the Continental Army slammed into Trenton at 8 a.m. on Thursday, December 26, surrounding and capturing most of the... The post Christmas Night, 1776: How Did They Cross? appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Continental Congress vs. Continental Army: The Officer Corps

When the Continental Congress first met it was intended to bring the American colonies together to find a solution to the growing disputes with... The post Continental Congress vs. Continental Army: The Officer Corps appeared first on Journal of the American...

The Dorchester Heights Memorial, South Boston, and the Celebration of Evacuation Day

On my way to Boston’s Logan Airport a while ago a taxi driver pointed towards Boston Harbor and started telling me about a Revolutionary... The post The Dorchester Heights Memorial, South Boston, and the Celebration of Evacuation Day appeared first...

Unlocking the Mystery of Ten Revolutionary Generals’ Signatures

Documents that contain the original signatures of more than one Continental Army general are rare.  During the eight years of the Revolutionary War, generals... The post Unlocking the Mystery of Ten Revolutionary Generals’ Signatures appeared...

A Discussion about Writing in Marlborough, 9 May

On Wednesday, 9 May, I’ll appear in the Friends of the Marlborough Public Library’s Author Series, discussing The Road to Concord, Colonial Comics: New England, this blog, and other writing. Here’s a P.D.F. file of the flyer for this...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 May 2018

“Henry Knox’s Mission” Lecture in Cambridge, 15 Mar.

On Thursday, 15 March, I’ll speak at Longfellow House–Washington’s Headquarters National Historic Site in Cambridge about “Myths and Realities of Henry Knox’s Mission.”Here’s the set-up:On November 16, 1775, Gen....
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Mar 2018

“Dangerous to delay taking Post on Dorchester Hills”

On 3 Mar 1776, Gen. George Washington followed up his short note to Gen. Artemas Ward (quoted yesterday) with a full set of orders for moving onto the Dorchester peninsula on the evening of the 4th.My Letter of last Night would inform you that the Genl...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Mar 2018

Are You Ready for a Cabinet Meeting?

For Presidents Day, we look in on George Washington’s meetings with his cabinet on 1-2 Aug 1793.The issue on the table was what to do about Edmond-Charles Genet, the French diplomat who was stirring up support of Revolutionary France, resentment...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Feb 2018

Reconnoitering the Dorchester Peninsula with the Generals

As I discussed yesterday, in early February 1776 Gen. George Washington and his engineers were discussing whether it was feasible to move onto the Dorchester peninsula and mount cannon there to threaten British shipping. On 12 February, the commander-in-chief...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Feb 2018

More Special Events in February

Here are a couple more events this month that caught my eye.On Sunday, 11 February, at 12:30 P.M. the Pickering House in Salem will host a presentation on “17th- & 18th-Century Food and Cookery” by Karen Scalia of Salem Food Tours. What...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Feb 2018

Knox Museum May Close in 2018

The Knox Museum in Thomaston, Maine, built to honor Gen. Henry Knox, has announced that it may close next year if it can’t quickly raise $150,000. The museum is a replica of Knox’s 1794 mansion, called Montpelier. The original fell into disrepair...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Dec 2017

Page 1 of 3123Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.