The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Historic Sites"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Historic Sites found 35 posts

Valley Forge’s Threshold: The Encampment at Gulph Mills

William Trego’s painting The March to Valley Forge is iconic. Where the Continental Army marched from has been largely overlooked. That march was from The... The post Valley Forge’s Threshold: The Encampment at Gulph Mills appeared first...

This Week on Dispatches: Gabriel Neville on the Historic Clove Road and Its Role during the Revolution

On this week’s Dispatches host Brady Crytzer interviews JAR contributor Gabriel “Gabe” Neville on the Clove Road between northern New Jersey and New York and... The post This Week on Dispatches: Gabriel Neville on the Historic Clove...

The Whitall Family and the Battle of Red Bank

James W. Whitall (1717-1808) was a prominent Quaker businessman and farmer in the southern region of New Jersey. In 1739 he married Ann Cooper... The post The Whitall Family and the Battle of Red Bank appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

The Beeline March: The Birth of the American Army

On a late spring afternoon in 1825, the two Bedinger brothers—Henry and Michael, old men now, seventy-four and sixty-nine respectively, proud immigrants from Alsace-Lorraine—commanded... The post The Beeline March: The Birth of the American...

Historic Structures and Sites Worth Preserving?

A recent article mentioned Sidman’s Tavern in New Jersey, a building with strong connections to the American Revolution that is under threat of destruction.... The post Historic Structures and Sites Worth Preserving? appeared first on Journal of...

The Last Vestige of the Clove Road

With no actionable intelligence, General Washington had to guess where British Maj. Gen. William Howe was taking his army. So in July 1777, he... The post The Last Vestige of the Clove Road appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

The Day Nôtre Dame Cathedral Hosted Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and King Louis XVI

1785 was a rare year in Paris—it was safely nestled between revolutions. The American Revolution had come to an official end right there in... The post The Day Nôtre Dame Cathedral Hosted Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and King Louis XVI appeared...

Witness Houses

I was out and about in Lexington and Concord last week as my favorite nurseries are in that area, and between bouts of perusing plants I walked around Lexington Green and along the Battle Road at the Minute Man National Historic Park. In both locales...
From: streets of salem on 29 May 2019

Top Ten Revolutionary War Patriot Homes in Connecticut

“Connecticut: Still Revolutionary,” is the official slogan of Connecticut’s tourism program since about 2014.  As a historian who worked in architecture as the son... The post Top Ten Revolutionary War Patriot Homes in Connecticut...

Retracing Alexander Hamilton’s Steps Through the Remnants of Revolutionary New York

When Alexander Hamilton arrived in New York in the early 1770s, the city was already the one of the largest in the colonies, second... The post Retracing Alexander Hamilton’s Steps Through the Remnants of Revolutionary New York appeared first on...

Christmas Night, 1776: How Did They Cross?

When the two columns of the Continental Army slammed into Trenton at 8 a.m. on Thursday, December 26, surrounding and capturing most of the... The post Christmas Night, 1776: How Did They Cross? appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Recognizing the Skirmish at Kemp’s Landing

November 10, 1775 was an important day in both Great Britain and America. Lord George Germain assumed duties as the Secretary of State for... The post Recognizing the Skirmish at Kemp’s Landing appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

The Dorchester Heights Memorial, South Boston, and the Celebration of Evacuation Day

On my way to Boston’s Logan Airport a while ago a taxi driver pointed towards Boston Harbor and started telling me about a Revolutionary... The post The Dorchester Heights Memorial, South Boston, and the Celebration of Evacuation Day appeared first...

A Brief History of Benjamin Franklin’s Residences on Craven Street, London: 1757 – 1775

If one looked into Benjamin Franklin’s time on Craven Street, they might initially believe he lived at 36 Craven Street the entirety of his two stays in London based on the plethora of articles on the internet that say so. If they dug a little deeper...

A Revolutionary Guide to Arlington Cemetery

Arlington National Cemetery’s founding story is well known. During the American Civil War, Union forces occupied Robert E. Lee’s 1000-acre estate on the Potomac River directly across from Washington, DC and, as a form of retribution for Lee...

We Are One: Mapping America’s Road from Revolution to Independence

But what still hightens our Apprehensions is that those unexpected proceedings may be preparatory to new Taxations upon us: For if our Trade may be taxed why not our Lands? Why not the produce of our Lands and every Thing we possess or make use of? This...

Visiting Boston’s Liberty Tree Site

“For it’s a tall old tree and a strong old tree. And we are the sons, yes, we are the sons… the sons of liberty”[1]. So went the catchy song that the tea-dumping Sons of Liberty sang loudly in the streets that night, all in perfect...

Fort Franklin: Tory Bastion on Long Island Sound

Following their victory at the Battle of Long Island (Brooklyn) on August 27 1776, the British established their headquarters in New York City where it remained throughout the war. They extended their control eastward into Long Island, intending to use...

Planning the Final Action: George Washington and Rochambeau, May 1781

After the Americans’ stunning victory at Saratoga on October 17, 1777, King Louis XVI ordered his ministers to negotiate a formal alliance between France and the United States. Conrad Alexander Gérard of France and Benjamin Franklin, Silas Deane, and...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.