The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Historical"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Historical found 1549 posts

The Legends of Sandy Flash Drive

The Philadelphia Inquirer just published an article about how two roads in the region—in areas where I’ve traveled, in fact—are named after a Revolutionary turncoat and highwayman. This circumstance raises interesting questions about...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Jan 2020

“Moving Beyond the Military Revolution” by Scott K Taylor (me) in the BSPHS, 2019

Scott K Taylor, “Moving Beyond the Military Revolution,” review article in the Bulletin for Spanish and Portuguese Historical Studies 44/1 (2019): 163-70.
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 14 Jan 2020

‘The Perils of Being an Early-Modern Bottle-Blonde’ – A Guest Post by Pete Langman

It’s quite usual to compliment the author of a work of historical fiction on their research, even though this doesn’t mean much more than ‘we’ve read the same history books’, but there is something to be said for appropriating...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 10 Jan 2020

Axes in New France: Part 11 French Colonial-made Axes

https://secureservercdn.net/198.71.233.109/tnx.0f5.myftpupload.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Axes-in-New-France-Part-2-French-Colonial-made-Axes.pdf
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 2 Jan 2020

18th Century Recipes for a 21st Century Thanksgiving

Every November,  scores of American families sit down to Thanksgiving dinner, a tradition followed for almost 400 years in the New World. The main dish of this celebratory feast is a turkey, stuffed and roasted to perfection. In the 18th century,...
From: Jane Austen's World on 28 Nov 2019

Inspecting the Tea Party House

In the 1890s the old Bradlee house at the corner of Hollis and Tremont Streets became known as the “Tea Party House.” Until it was leveled in 1898, it was on lists of what tourists should see in Boston. Even after that, people sold souvenir...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Nov 2019

November

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Supplement to the Boston-Gazette (November 20, 1769). “TO BE SOLD BY Harbottle Dorr …” Harbottle Dorr is not a household name today, but Dorr remains well known...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 20 Nov 2019

The pros & cons and ups & downs of OCR and Scrivener

(Warning: tech talk ahead!) I’ve been putting research documents into Scrivener, assuming that they were searchable. After all, one oft-stated advantage of using Scrivener is that you have all your documents in one place. It’s true that I...
From: Baroque Explorations on 18 Oct 2019

New Book (& Prize!): Cagle, “Assembling the Tropics”

Hugh Cagle, Assembling the Tropics: Science and Medicine in Portugal’s Empire, 1450-1700 (Cambridge, 2018). And congratulations for winning the AHA’s Leo Gershoy Award for 2019!  
From: EM Spanish History Notes on 8 Oct 2019

Seven little known facts about Nell Gwyn: A Guest Post by Deborah Swift

1. Nell experimented with cross-dressing.  Between 1663 and 1667 she posed under the name “William Nell” and adopted a false beard. The disguise stood her in good stead when she needed to act as a man on the stage in March 1667,...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 16 Sep 2019

Museum of Appalachia to Host “Days of the Pioneer” Antique Exposition - September 13th & 14th

Museum of Appalachia P.O. Box 1189, Norris, TN 37828 Phone: 865-494-7680 or 494-0514 E-mail: janmarshall@museumofappalachia.org www.museumofappalachia.orgMuseum of Appalachia to Host “Days of the Pioneer” Antique Exposition - September 13th...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 10 Sep 2019

Bored Now: or, Captain Blood Plays Another Game of Solitaire

Maritime history has provided me with many satisfying and pleasurable moments since I started studying it seriously *cough* years ago, but there’s something a bit special about chairing a conference session where [a] all the speakers are running...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 10 Sep 2019

Tools Made from Rasps or Files

Tools Historic Maritime I (1607-1676): The First Colonial Dominion The Davistown Museum - Tools Made from Rasps or Files 31-Jul-14 Blacksmiths re-use worn or damaged files and rasps by making them into something else. All the tools listed here are also...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 9 Sep 2019

"Writing About the Romanovs": Guest Post by Gill Paul, Author of THE LOST DAUGHTER

I'm excited to welcome Gill Paul to the blog today to talk about her latest novel, THE LOST DAUGHTER, recently released from William Morrow. I'm about a hundred pages in, and can assure you that this is a story you won't want to miss! A dual-timeline...
From: Writing the Renaissance on 5 Sep 2019

Wooden Clothing Buttons.

Wooden Clothing Buttons.Wood buttons were also made in colonial crafts shops and homes. During the 18th century, most wooden buttons were plain and utilitarian. In 1770, Benjamin Randolph advertised his apple, holy, and laurel buttons (Luscomb, ix). Decorated...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 31 Aug 2019

Fridge List for Fall 2019

Kimberly Alexander Upcoming Talks for Fall 2019:Treasures Afoot: Shoe Stories from the Georgian Era andFashioning the New England FamilySeptember 9, 7:00pmWiggin Memorial Library and Stratham Historical Society, Stratham, NHFashioning the 18th...
From: SilkDamask on 21 Aug 2019

Pirates & Privateers Newsletter.

https://pub47.bravenet.com/bravemailer/v2/online.php?id=861&usernum=3977197897&e=historicaltrekker%40gmail.com&cname=Keith
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 20 Aug 2019

Vichy France Offers Insights into the Trump Era

The Vichy government in occupied France during the Second World War became notorious for its collaboration with Nazi Germany and its organization of deportations of Jews and its participation in the bureaucratic mechanisms of the Holocaust. The Vichy...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.