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Search Results for "Historiography"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Historiography found 573 posts

Atlas of Boston History Wins Historic New England Book Prize

Historic New England (formerly the Society for the Protection of New England Antiquities) has awarded its 2020 Book Prize to The Atlas of Boston History, edited by Nancy S. Seasholes and written by her and a bevy of contributors, including me. The society...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Nov 2020

Hagist on Britain’s “Noble Volunteers,” 15 Nov.

On Sunday, 15 November, Fort Ticonderoga will host an online presentation by Don N. Hagist about his new book, Noble Volunteers: The British Soldiers Who Fought the American Revolution.Don has been researching the enlisted men of the British army for...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Nov 2020

“I would hope that you are the Sons of Liberty from principle”

I want to highlight the web version of Jordan E. Taylor’s Early American Studies article “Enquire of the Printer: The Slave Trade and Early American Newspaper Advertising.”Produced using ArcGIS’s Storymaps platform, the article...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Nov 2020

Are we there yet? On the Pandemic, Trumpism, and the History of Anticipation

Jerry Bannister Last spring, in response to Denis McKim’s thoughtful post about the potential impacts of the pandemic on the study of Canadian history, I started a short piece on how the larger social crises were shaping our historical perspectives. ...
From: Borealia on 5 Nov 2020

Seminar on John Dickinson and the Constitution, Starting 21 Oct.

Back in 2012 I made a point about the steady flow of books on Thomas Paine by comparing that output to the sparse number of books on John Dickinson.I counted over a dozen recent books on Paine and only two on Dickinson—one published by an outfit...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Oct 2020

A New Women’s History Podcast to Enjoy

Your Most Obedient & Humble Servant is a new podcast hosted by Kathryn Gehred, one of the editors working on the forthcoming scholarly collection of Martha Washington’s correspondence.Each episode digs into one letter to or from a woman in the...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Oct 2020

“He who wielded Medusa’s head on his shield”: A Danish Historic-Poetic Perspective on the French Revolution

This piece is a part of our ongoing series, entitle “Rethinking the Revolutionary Canon.”  By Kasper Rathjen In  1838, the Danish pastor and poet Nikolaj Frederik Severin Grundtvig (1783-1872) gave his lecture, “Mands...
From: Age of Revolutions on 5 Oct 2020

“Onesimus and Rev. Cotton Mather” Program, 1 Oct.

On Thursday, 1 October, I’ll be part of an online discussion through the Freedom Forum on “Onesimus and Rev. Cotton Mather: Race, Religion, and the Press in Colonial America.” The Freedom Forum’s description says:The third program...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Sep 2020

Online Schoolwork from the Gilder Lehrman Institute

The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History has announced a series of free online courses for elementary, middle, and high school students. The institute has a teacher-training program and a big collection of documents, and these classes draw on...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Sep 2020

Three Online Events on Revolutionary History Tonight

September usually brings a burst of historical events as the academic calendar restarts while museums and tourist sites keep appealing to visitors. This year the pandemic means that a lot of those events are being organized online, and are thus available...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Sep 2020

Hobsbawm on Nationalism and Revolution

This piece is a part of our ongoing series, entitle “Rethinking the Revolutionary Canon.”  By Iker Itoiz Ciáurriz At the time of his death in 2012, Marxist historian Eric Hobsbawm was the most recognized British historian...
From: Age of Revolutions on 21 Sep 2020

Women Who Voted in a Colonial Massachusetts Town Meeting

Ten years ago, I noted the legend of Lydia Taft, a widow in Uxbridge who was said to have voted in a town meeting in 1756. That statement appeared in print in 1881, in the publication of a speech delivered seventeen years before. That book cited no records...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Sep 2020

The Disappearing Daughters of Jerusalem: Erasing Women from Early Canadian Methodist History

Scott McLaren “The greater part of an author’s time is spent in reading,” Samuel Johnson is widely reported to have said. “He must turn over half a library to write one book.” What Johnson didn’t say is that in the...
From: Borealia on 16 Sep 2020

Andrew Dickson White and America’s Unfinished (French) Revolution

This piece is a part of our ongoing series, entitle “Rethinking the Revolutionary Canon.”  By Gregory S. Brown “Laissons au grands écrivains le récit dramatiques des choses …nous cherchons dans la Révolution...
From: Age of Revolutions on 14 Sep 2020

“When Washington Went to War at Sea” at Historic Beverly, 14 Sept.

On Monday, 14 September, I’ll deliver an online presentation through Historic Beverly on “When Washington Went to War at Sea: How Beverly Became the General’s Naval Base.” Our teaser:In the fall of 1775, Gen. George Washington...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Sep 2020

The “Reflecting Attucks” Exhibit Expands Online

Some of the last historical events I attended in person were the Sestercentennial commemorations of the Boston Massacre at the Old South Meeting House and the Old State House—now Revolutionary Spaces.At the time, the Old State House museum was opening...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Aug 2020

Vénus Noire: An Interview with Robin Mitchell

Vénus Noire: Black Women and Colonial Fantasies in Nineteenth Century France is a rigorously researched study of Black women in France in the nineteenth century that explores the production of whiteness and blackness through the cultural mania...
From: Age of Revolutions on 31 Aug 2020

“Material Culture of Sugar” Webinar from Historic Deerfield, 26 Sept.

Way back in April, Historic Deerfield was going to host a one-day forum on sugar in early New England culture. But then people recognized the Covid-19 virus had started to spread in this country, and institutions postponed their public events for a few...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Aug 2020

How I Zoomed My Summer Vacation

It’s the part of August in New England when the sky is overcast, the air has a chill, and hurricanes sometimes pass by. Back when I was growing up, my family always managed to be on a New Hampshire lakeside during that week, shivering in sweaters...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Aug 2020

How Not to Read Bernard Bailyn: The Current Conservative Appropriation of a Monumental Historian Gets Him Wrong

By Asheesh Kapur Siddique The passing of intellectual giants inevitably prompts a collective stocktaking of their influence and importance – but such assessments also act as occasions to weaponize them in the service of current culture wars, especially...
From: Age of Revolutions on 18 Aug 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.