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Your search for posts with tags containing Historiography found 563 posts

Hobsbawm on Nationalism and Revolution

This piece is a part of our ongoing series, entitle “Rethinking the Revolutionary Canon.”  By Iker Itoiz Ciáurriz At the time of his death in 2012, Marxist historian Eric Hobsbawm was the most recognized British historian...
From: Age of Revolutions on 21 Sep 2020

Women Who Voted in a Colonial Massachusetts Town Meeting

Ten years ago, I noted the legend of Lydia Taft, a widow in Uxbridge who was said to have voted in a town meeting in 1756. That statement appeared in print in 1881, in the publication of a speech delivered seventeen years before. That book cited no records...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Sep 2020

The Disappearing Daughters of Jerusalem: Erasing Women from Early Canadian Methodist History

Scott McLaren “The greater part of an author’s time is spent in reading,” Samuel Johnson is widely reported to have said. “He must turn over half a library to write one book.” What Johnson didn’t say is that in the...
From: Borealia on 16 Sep 2020

Andrew Dickson White and America’s Unfinished (French) Revolution

This piece is a part of our ongoing series, entitle “Rethinking the Revolutionary Canon.”  By Gregory S. Brown “Laissons au grands écrivains le récit dramatiques des choses …nous cherchons dans la Révolution...
From: Age of Revolutions on 14 Sep 2020

“When Washington Went to War at Sea” at Historic Beverly, 14 Sept.

On Monday, 14 September, I’ll deliver an online presentation through Historic Beverly on “When Washington Went to War at Sea: How Beverly Became the General’s Naval Base.” Our teaser:In the fall of 1775, Gen. George Washington...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Sep 2020

The “Reflecting Attucks” Exhibit Expands Online

Some of the last historical events I attended in person were the Sestercentennial commemorations of the Boston Massacre at the Old South Meeting House and the Old State House—now Revolutionary Spaces.At the time, the Old State House museum was opening...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Aug 2020

Vénus Noire: An Interview with Robin Mitchell

Vénus Noire: Black Women and Colonial Fantasies in Nineteenth Century France is a rigorously researched study of Black women in France in the nineteenth century that explores the production of whiteness and blackness through the cultural mania...
From: Age of Revolutions on 31 Aug 2020

“Material Culture of Sugar” Webinar from Historic Deerfield, 26 Sept.

Way back in April, Historic Deerfield was going to host a one-day forum on sugar in early New England culture. But then people recognized the Covid-19 virus had started to spread in this country, and institutions postponed their public events for a few...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Aug 2020

How I Zoomed My Summer Vacation

It’s the part of August in New England when the sky is overcast, the air has a chill, and hurricanes sometimes pass by. Back when I was growing up, my family always managed to be on a New Hampshire lakeside during that week, shivering in sweaters...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Aug 2020

How Not to Read Bernard Bailyn: The Current Conservative Appropriation of a Monumental Historian Gets Him Wrong

By Asheesh Kapur Siddique The passing of intellectual giants inevitably prompts a collective stocktaking of their influence and importance – but such assessments also act as occasions to weaponize them in the service of current culture wars, especially...
From: Age of Revolutions on 18 Aug 2020

Routes of Reverberation: Afterlives of Tacky’s Revolt

The following excerpt is from Vincent Brown‘s Tacky’s Revolt: The Story of an Atlantic Slave War (Harvard University Press, 2020). It has been republished with permission of the author and press. Copyright ©️ 2020 by Vincent...
From: Age of Revolutions on 10 Aug 2020

“Massachusetts Revolts!” at HistoryAuthorTalks, 4 Aug.

On Tuesday, 4 August, I’ll participate in an online conversation on the theme “Massachusetts Revolts!: How the Feisty New England Protests Changed the World.”This event is the latest digital discussion among historians to be organized...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Jul 2020

“America’s Summer Road Trip,” 1 Aug.

When History Camp Boston and then other History Camps had to be canceled this year because of the pandemic, the organizers of The Pursuit of History looked for another way to share historical information with the public. Lee Wright and Carrie Lund have...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Jul 2020

Age of Revolutions Webinar on Peru’s Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement

Age of Revolutions happily co-hosted a webinar event  with the Latin American and Latino/a Studies Program at Smith College on Miguel La Serna’s new book With Masses and Arms: Peru’s Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement (UNC Press,...
From: Age of Revolutions on 27 Jul 2020

A Revolution in Knowledge: The Intellectual Legacy of Visa Holders in the United States. A Permanent Work In Progress.

By Ernesto Bassi (Cornell University) and Javier Puente (Smith College)* The Motivation  On July 7, 2020, the Department of Homeland Security announced a new rule prohibiting international students of US universities from returning to or staying...
From: Age of Revolutions on 10 Jul 2020

Reading Too Much into the Declaration

Here’s something I’ve been thinking about since I heard the “Celebrating the Fourth” episode of the Ben Franklin’s World podcast from Liz Covart and the Omohundro Institute. That episode came out a year ago, though it took...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Jul 2020

Webinar Announcement and Registration

Age of Revolutions is happy to announce a webinar event co-hosted with the Latin American and Latino/a Studies Program at Smith College on Miguel La Serna’s new book With Masses and Arms: Peru’s Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement...
From: Age of Revolutions on 2 Jul 2020

Perspectives on Boston’s 1764 Smallpox Epidemic

On 13 Apr 1764, John Adams sent his fiancée Abigail a story about being inoculated against smallpox in Boston. Through a cousin of Abigail’s, Dr. Cotton Tufts, Adams and his brother had received a referral to Dr. Nathaniel Perkins. At first...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Jun 2020

“Tom Gage’s Proclamation” Parodied

The Readex newspaper database I use offers this page from the 28 June 1775 issue of the Pennsylvania Journal and Weekly Advertiser.In fact, it offers two images of this page, apparently identical.Obviously, someone clipped an item out of the copy of that...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Jun 2020

New Publications from the Journal of the American Revolution

I came across the 1818 recollections of the Battle of Bunker Hill that I shared last week while writing a new article for the Journal of the American Revolution website: “Who Said, ‘Don’t Fire Till You See the Whites of Their Eyes’?”Way...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Jun 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.