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Search Results for "Historiography"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Historiography found 547 posts

Webinar Announcement and Registration

Age of Revolutions is happy to announce a webinar event co-hosted with the Latin American and Latino/a Studies Program at Smith College on Miguel La Serna’s new book With Masses and Arms: Peru’s Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement...
From: Age of Revolutions on 2 Jul 2020

Perspectives on Boston’s 1764 Smallpox Epidemic

On 13 Apr 1764, John Adams sent his fiancée Abigail a story about being inoculated against smallpox in Boston. Through a cousin of Abigail’s, Dr. Cotton Tufts, Adams and his brother had received a referral to Dr. Nathaniel Perkins. At first...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Jun 2020

“Tom Gage’s Proclamation” Parodied

The Readex newspaper database I use offers this page from the 28 June 1775 issue of the Pennsylvania Journal and Weekly Advertiser.In fact, it offers two images of this page, apparently identical.Obviously, someone clipped an item out of the copy of that...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Jun 2020

New Publications from the Journal of the American Revolution

I came across the 1818 recollections of the Battle of Bunker Hill that I shared last week while writing a new article for the Journal of the American Revolution website: “Who Said, ‘Don’t Fire Till You See the Whites of Their Eyes’?”Way...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Jun 2020

Reading the History of Slavery: 3 Experts Offer Book Recommendations

Perhaps more than ever, we need to better educate ourselves on the history of slavery, and consider the ways in which it informs how we have arrived at the present. We invited three prominent scholars to recommend books that speak to the current historical...
From: Age of Revolutions on 15 Jun 2020

“To catch a red herring at last”

Yesterday I shared a use of the phrase “red herring” in a political setting from 1782. Here’s a trail to an even earlier usage. Lord Carteret, who after 1744 was the second Earl Granville, was active in the British government from 1719...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 May 2020

“Including the records of very poor people”

I’ve been analyzing Michael Bellesiles’s interview on Daniel Gullotta’s Age of Jackson podcast last year, particularly his comments about the Emory University committee that criticized his book Arming America.The relevant part of that...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 May 2020

“Prolix, confusing, evasive and occasionally contradictory”

As I described yesterday, in 2002 Emory University asked three senior historians from other colleges to investigate specific questions about Michael Bellesiles’s research in Arming America.The committee’s report (P.D.F. download) concluded:Subsequent...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 May 2020

Making The Black Jacobins

This piece is a part of our ongoing series, entitled “Rethinking the Revolutionary Canon.”  By Rachel Douglas The Black Jacobins (1938) by Caribbean Marxist intellectual C. L. R. James is one of the great works of the 20th century. This...
From: Age of Revolutions on 25 May 2020

Arming America: How “the Controversy Arose”

As I described yesterday, in 2002 Emory University asked three outside scholars to investigate charges of “failures of scholarly care and integrity” against Michael Bellesiles, author of Arming America.Those scholars were academic heavyweights:...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 May 2020

Arming America Twenty Years On

As my Sestercentennial postings from last fall recounted, the last part of the year 1769 in Boston was punctuated with gunfire:a shot from a British soldier’s musket during the Neck Riot.two pistol shots during the merchants’ assault on John...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 May 2020

Looking Back on the Bloody Flux of 1775

In a time of pandemic, one’s thoughts turn naturally toward outbreaks of the past. In April 1942, Dr. Ernest Caulfield presented a paper on “Some Common Diseases of Colonial Children” to the Colonial Society of Massachusetts. It can...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 May 2020

Knott on the Washington-Hamilton Relationship, 15 May

On Friday, 15 May, the Lexington Historical Society is hosting its annual Cronin Lecture—but this year the talk will be online. The event announcement says:Join Stephen Knott, co-author [with Tony Williams] of Washington and Hamilton: The Alliance...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 May 2020

Carrot Pudding from the 1730s

Several years back, Alyssa Connell wrote at Cooking in the Archives about a handwritten cookbook in the collection of the University of Pennsylvania: This two-volume recipe book is dated 1730 (vol. 1) and 1744 (vol. 2) and belonged to Judeth Bedingfield,...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 May 2020

Sovereignty at Stake in 1789: The French Revolution Begins

By Robert H. Blackman What do historians mean when they say that sovereignty moved from King Louis XVI of France to the National Assembly on 17 June 1789? That was the date when the deputies of the Third Estate, along with a score of deputies from the...
From: Age of Revolutions on 11 May 2020

Online Events and Videos While We Stay Home

With the pandemic, almost every historical site, museum, and society that hosted events has now pivoted to organizing and promoting online events. Sometimes that means an interview with a historian or other expert at home, produced over a platform like...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 May 2020

History Summit online, 25 April

With book launches and tours canceled because of the pandemic, authors are turning to technology to promote their work and talk with readers. On Saturday, 25 April, twenty-two authors will appear online as part of History Summit 2020. Lindsay M. Chervinsky...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Apr 2020

CALL FOR PAPERS: RSA

Philadelphia Marriott DowntownCourtyard Philadelphia Downtown2–4 April 2020Conference hashtag: #RenSA20Submission deadline: 15 August 2019The submission website will open later this month (June 2019). The link will be posted in this space. A current...
From: The Renaissance Diary on 20 Apr 2020

Canadian History After COVID-19

Denis McKim Thomas Paine likened the American Revolution to the deluge. In much the same way that God had hit the “reset button” on history itself through the flood recounted in Genesis, the United States had initiated a new epoch by revolting...
From: Borealia on 20 Apr 2020

Prepping for Patriots’ Day 2020 Online

The anniversary of the Battle of Lexington and Concord is coming up on 19 April, so I’ll shift topics (mostly) from the Sestercentennial of the reaction to the Boston Massacre to the opening of the Revolutionary War.Of course, right now we’re...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Apr 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.