The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "History of Astronomy"

Showing 1 - 20 of 280

Your search for posts with tags containing History of Astronomy found 280 posts

A Cock is a Thing that Ticks

As I have mentioned a few times in the past, I came late to the computer and the Internet. No Sinclairs, Ataris, or Commadores in my life, my first computer was a Bondi Blue iMac G3. All of which is kind of ironic, because by the time I acquired that...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 30 Mar 2022

A terrible fortnight for the HISTSCI_HULK

It’s been a tough two weeks for my old buddy the HISTSCI_HULK, who has now packed his bags and departed for pastures unknown screaming, “you can all kiss my posterior!” That not what he actually said but you get the message.  So, what has upset...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 16 Mar 2022

Renaissance science – XXVIII

In the last episode of this series, we explored the history of the magnetic compass in Europe and marine cartography from the Portolan chart to the Mercator Projection. We will now turn our attention to the other developments in navigation at sea in the...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 11 Feb 2022

WRONG, WRONG, WRONG…

I think the Internet has finally broken the HISTSCI_HULK; he’s lying in the corner sobbing bitterly and mumbling wrong, wrong, wrong… like a broken record. What could have felled the mighty beast?  29 January was the anniversary of the birth (1611)...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 31 Jan 2022

The black sheep of the Provence-Paris group

I continue my sketches of the seventeenth century group pf mathematicians and astronomers associated with Nicolas-Claude Fabri de Peiresc (1580-1637) in Provence and Marin Mersenne (1588–1648) in Paris with Jean-Baptiste Morin (1583–1656), who...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 19 Jan 2022

STOMP. STOMP, STOMP … KEPLER DID WOT!

I really shouldn’t but the HISTSCI_HULK is twisting my arm and muttering dark threats, so here goes. A week ago, we took apart Vedang Sati’s post 10 Discoveries By Newton That Changed The World. When I copied it to my blog, I removed the links that...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 17 Jan 2022

Renaissance science – XXVI

I wrote a whole fifty-two-part blog post series on The Emergence of Modern Astronomy, much of which covered the same period as this series, so I’m not going to repeat it here. However, an interesting question is, did the developments in astronomy during...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 12 Jan 2022

The Epicurean mathematician

Continuing our look at the group of mathematician astronomers associated with Nicolas-Claude Fabri de Peiresc (1580-1637) in Provence and Marin Mersenne (1588–1648) in Paris, we turn today to Pierre Gassendi (1592–1655), celebrated in the world...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 5 Jan 2022

Christmas Trilogy 2021 Part 3: Don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater 

Christmas Trilogy 2021 Part 3: Don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater  From the beginning of European astronomy, sometime during the third millennium BCE in the Fertile Crescent, all the way down to the middle of the seventeenth century CE,...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 27 Dec 2021

OHMS or everything you wanted to know about the history of trigonometry and didn’t know who to ask

When I was a kid, letters from government departments came in buff, manila envelopes with OHMS printed on the front is large, black, capital letters. This acronym stood for, On Her Majesty’s Service and earlier during Liz’s father’s reign (and no...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 8 Dec 2021

The astronomical librarian 

I’m continuing my look at the French mathematician astronomers of the seventeenth century with some of those, who were both members of Nicolas-Claude Fabri de Peiresc’s group of telescopic, astronomical observers, as well as Marin Mersenne’s informal Academia...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 24 Nov 2021

Renaissance Science – XXII

Perhaps surprisingly, land surveying as we know it today, a mathematical discipline utilising complex technological measuring instruments is very much a product of the practical mathematics of the Renaissance. Why surprisingly? Surveying is an ancient...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 4 Nov 2021

The amateur, astronomical, antiquarian aristocrat from Ai

In a recent blog post about the Minim friar, Marin Mersenne (1588–1648), I mentioned that when Mersenne arrived in Paris in 1619 he was introduced to the intellectual elite of the city by Nicolas-Claude Fabri de Peiresc (1580-1637). In another recent...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 27 Oct 2021

Internet Superstar, who are you, what do you think you are?

He’s back! After his stupendously, mind-bogglingly, world shattering success rabbiting on about the history of astronomy on the History for Atheists YouTube channel, he can now be heard going on and on and on and on and on and on…  about the...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 30 Sep 2021

A seventeenth century Jesuit, who constructed his own monument and designed the first(?) ‘auto-mobile’.

One of the world’s great tourist attractions is the Imperial Observatory in Beijing. Source: Top 12 Best Places to go visiting Beijing The man, who rebuilt it in its current impressive form was the seventeenth century Jesuit mathematician, astronomer,...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 1 Sep 2021

The seventeenth-century Chinese civil servant from Cologne 

From its very beginnings the Society of Jesus (the Jesuits) was set up as a missionary movement carrying the Catholic Religion to all corners of the world. It also had a very strong educational emphasis in its missions, carrying the knowledge of Europe...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 4 Aug 2021

The Renaissance Mathematicus tries his luck as YouTube Influencer

Some time back I had a late-night chat with medieval historian Tim O’Neill about all things Galileo Galilei; late night for me that is, early morning for him. Unbeknown to me the sneaky Aussie bugger recorded my ruminations on the Tuscan mathematicus;...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 2 Aug 2021

It’s Galileo time again!

An article in the Sunday Express, not a newspaper I would normally read in fact I would only ever use it as toilet paper in an emergency, starts thus: Former Supreme Court Judge Lord Sumption has condemned attacks on scientists who challenge “official...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 31 Jul 2021

They also serve…

In 1610, Galileo published his Sidereus Nuncius, the first publication to make known the new astronomical discoveries made with the recently invented telescope. Source: Wikimedia Commons Although, one should also emphasise that although Galileo...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 7 Jul 2021

The deviser of the King’s horologes

There can’t be many Renaissance mathematici, whose existence was ennobled by a personal portrait by the master of the Renaissance portrait, Hans Holbein the younger. In fact, I only know of one, the German mathematicus, Nicolas Kratzer. Nicolas...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 9 Jun 2021

Page 1 of 14123456Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.