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Search Results for "History of Reading"

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Your search for posts with tags containing History of Reading found 65 posts

Virtual Office Hours

This past week, several of the archaeologists partnered up with the Bibliographical Society of America to offer a webinar on the uses of AOR for remote teaching and research. Many thanks to Erin Schreiner for including us in the series, as well as for...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 26 Mar 2020

School’s In Session

Notes on Juvenal’s Satires, a colored woodcut from a 1498 edition in the George Peabody Library  (Incun. 1498 J592) As the new academic year comes rolling in, we’re ready to hit the books again. We’ve added a few new elements to...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 10 Sep 2019

Looking Back, Looking Forward

It’s been a busy few weeks here at AOR as we look to finalize the content of our website, and it’s hard to believe that our final AOR symposium took place over a month ago! It was encouraging to see so many old and new faces in Senate House...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 5 Mar 2019

Down to the Detail of Dee’s Greek Marginalia

Happy New Year from the AOR team! In order to start 2019 and the last month of AOR with a bang, here’s the blog written by our research assistant and newly-minted doctor Juan Avecedo! I have spent some weeks transcribing Dee’s Greek marginalia...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 7 Jan 2019

Project Update: John Dee Meets Albert Einstein

Two weeks ago, a good portion of the AOR Humanities team convened at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton for one final meeting before we all meet in London to celebrate the end of the project! Unlike March’s meeting on Dee and his books,...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 10 Oct 2018

Annotated Books at UCLA: Wider Applications of the AoR Schema

This guest entry comes from Philip Palmer, Head of Research Services at the Clark Library at UCLA. Philip writes about his experience using the AOR schema to encode transcriptions of annotated books held at UCLA In July of 2014 I started a CLIR postdoctoral...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 7 Sep 2018

John Dee’s IDs

A signed note on the title page of Dee’s copy of the BaderbuchlinBlizzard aside, it was great to take AoR on the road for this year’s RSA in New Orleans. Some great conversations emerged from discussion of Dee’s books, both in and out...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 25 Apr 2018

Defying interpretation? Topical marginalia and the history of reading

At the most recent conference of the Renaissance Society of America (RSA) in New Orleans, I planned to speak about the difficulties in writing a more general history of historical reading practices and offer several possible solutions. More specifically,...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 9 Apr 2018

Digitization and its discontents

In an earlier blog, Matt Symonds discussed some losses which are inevitably part of the process of digitization. The material aspects of books in particular – their size, weight, feel and, indeed, smell – are difficult or impossible to convey...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 9 Feb 2018

Dee’s Mistakes

How did John Dee make sense of what he was reading? We at AOR have the luxury of examining Dee’s annotations with the apparatus of stable critical editions, the extensive reserves of research libraries, and the even more capacious Google search...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 30 Jan 2018

The Archaeology of Reading Hamlet

This past summer I had the opportunity to use the Archaeology of Reading to help teach a course for a group of community college students visiting Johns Hopkins. This course was part of a national, Mellon-funded initiative to bring together community...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 13 Dec 2017

Ann Bathurst – Poet

Ann Bathurst (c. 1638-1704) was a theological and mystical writer. She was connected to the seventeenth-century dissenting religious group, the London Philadelphian Society, which was named after the church of Philadelphia mentioned in the Book of Revelation...
From: RECIRC on 15 Nov 2017

The AOR2 Transcriber’s Manual is now available online!

At the very beginning of the first phase of AOR (2014-2016), I started working on what would become the Transcriber’s Manual. Initially this document was intended to provide the research assistants with an overview of all the reader’s interventions...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 19 Oct 2017

John Dee’s Astronomicon and the Thirty-Six Decans

This blog post is written by another research assistant, Matt Beros. Matt is currently working on the first volume of Cicero’s Opera after just having finished transcribing Quintilian’s Institutionum oratoriarum! ——— In this...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 21 Sep 2017

Dee’s Historical Comparisons & the Mystery of ‘Liber Gallicus’

This blog is written by Daisy Owens, one of the three Research Assistants working on AOR. —————— John Dee frequently refers to other books within his own collection in his marginal annotations, and by tracing these...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 29 Aug 2017

Dee and his books

Summer or not, we are slaving away at the CELL office in order to transcribe all the annotations contained in the books which are part of our Dee corpus! This blog post, by Finn Schulze-Feldmann, one of the three research assistants involved in phase...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 31 Jul 2017

AOR on tour II: scholarly tourism in Poland

I have always been a big fan of the Dutch expression ‘het nuttige met het aangename verenigen’, that is, to combine or unite the useful with the pleasant (in Dutch – a superior and more elegant language 😉 – it sounds far...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 29 Jun 2017

AOR on tour II: scholarly tourism in Poland

I have always been a big fan of the Dutch expression ‘het nuttige met het aangename verenigen’, that is, to combine or unite the useful with the pleasant (in Dutch – a superior and more elegant language – it sounds far less clunky)....
From: Archaeology of Reading on 29 Jun 2017

AOR on tour

As the conference season has started in earnest, various members of the AOR team have travelled across the globe in order to preach the AOR-gospel. Here are some updates on the various conferences at which we presented! RSA 2017 As part of a now firmly...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 16 Jun 2017

AOR on tour

As the conference season has started in earnest, various members of the AOR team have travelled across the globe in order to preach the AOR-gospel. Here are some updates on the various conferences at which we presented! RSA 2017 As part of a now firmly...
From: Archaeology of Reading on 16 Jun 2017

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.