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Search Results for "History of Science"

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Your search for posts with tags containing History of Science found 445 posts

Renaissance Science – I

To paraphrase what is possibly the most infamous opening sentence in a history of science book[1], there was no such thing as Renaissance science, and this is the is the start of a bog post series about it. Put another way there are all sorts of problems...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 13 Jan 2021

The emergence of modern astronomy – a complex mosaic: Part LII

This is a concluding summary to my The emergence of modern astronomy – a complex mosaic blog post series. It is an attempt to produce an outline sketch of the path that we have followed over the last two years. There are, at the appropriate...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 30 Dec 2020

Illuminating medieval science

  There is a widespread popular vision of the Middle ages, as some sort of black hole of filth, disease, ignorance, brutality, witchcraft and blind devotion to religion. This fairly-tale version of history is actively propagated by authors of popular...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 9 Dec 2020

The emergence of modern astronomy – a complex mosaic: Part L

By the end of the eighteenth century, Newton’s version of the heliocentric theory was firmly established as the accepted model of the solar system. Whilst not yet totally accurate, a reasonable figure for the distance between the Earth and the Sun,...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 2 Dec 2020

New Humanist: Vesper Flights by Helen Macdonald

It is like a scene from a Hayao Miyazaki anime: a French WWI pilot, gliding down at twilight over enemy lines, finds himself surrounded by a flock of swifts seemingly motionless in the air. They are asleep on the wing, so close by he might reach out and...
From: Mathew Lyons on 30 Nov 2020

Literary Review: The History of Magic by Chris Gosden

“Human kind / Cannot bear very much reality,” TS Eliot wrote in the Four Quartets, the fruit of his own long struggle with spiritual torment. Eliot ultimately found solace in the late-medieval Christian mysticism of Julian of Norwich, but...
From: Mathew Lyons on 26 Nov 2020

A master instrument maker from a small town in the Fränkischen Schweiz

  Eggolsheim is a small market town about twenty kilometres almost due north of Erlangen in the Fränkischen Schweiz (Franconian Switzerland). Eggolsheim Source: Wikimedia Commons The Fränkischen Schweiz is a hilly area with many rock faces...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 25 Nov 2020

Prospect: The Light Ages by Seb Falk

There are few easier ways to enrage a medievalist than to refer to the era they study as ‘the Dark Ages’. But those who think of the medieval world – and medieval Catholicism in particular – as the antithesis of reason and progress,...
From: Mathew Lyons on 18 Nov 2020

“A sea of wild, woolly thinking!”

Today’s musings on the history of science re-examine a topic that I have already dealt with several times in the past, that of presentist judgements on the heuristic used by a historical figure to find or reach their solution to a given scientific...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 28 Oct 2020

“Stop, here is the empire of death”

Ancient Romans buried their dead outside city walls to avoid contamination.  Medieval Christians, in contrast, kept their dead close, in churchyards or even within church walls, in crypts below the nave or entombed in the floor.  Later, elaborate...
From: Anita Guerrini on 24 Oct 2020

Astrolabes and Armillary Spheres

The Center for Renaissance Studies at the Newberry Library is hosting a virtual discussion of scientific instruments and scientific knowledge in the Renaissance. Here is the announcement from the Center for Renaissance Studies: Astrolabes...

Settler Science in New Brunswick: The Brydone Jack Observatory and the Invention of European Sovereignty

Richard Yeomans New Brunswick’s western border with the state of Maine has long been one of the most contested geopolitical terrains in North America. After the end of the American Revolution, and the partition of New Brunswick from the British...
From: Borealia on 28 Sep 2020

New Research on Vikings

DNA studies are revealing new information on complicated ethnic backgrounds of Viking warriors and traders in medieval Europe. A research team led by a professor at the University of Copenhagen has analyzed the genomes of 443 bodies buried in Viking...

Saint Sebastian and the Arrows of the Plague

The Center for Renaissance Studies at the Newberry Library has published a new episode of its series on Learning from Premodern Plagues on “Saint Sebastian and the Arrows of the Plague.” Students in my courses on HIST 110 History of the Western...

The emergence of modern astronomy – a complex mosaic: Part XLIV

Whilst the European community mathematicians and physicist, i.e. those who could comprehend and understand it, were more than prepared to acknowledge Newton’s Principia as a mathematical masterpiece, many of them could not accept some of the very...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 9 Sep 2020

Archaeological Fieldwork in the Age of Enlightenment

Jennifer Westerfeld (University of Louisville) will offer an online seminar on “‘I await the financial recovery of France’: Funding Archaeological Fieldwork in the Age of Enlightenment” on 18 September 2020. This seminar is hosted...

People in Motion Podcasts on the History of Pandemics

The People in Motion: Entangled Histories of Displacement across the Mediterranean (PIMo) network of historians is providing a series of podcasts on the history of pandemics to provide a deeper context for understanding on the current Covid-19 pandemic....

A scientific Dutchman

For many decades the popular narrative version of the scientific revolution started in Poland/Germany with Copernicus moving on through Tycho in Denmark, Kepler in Germany/Austria, Galileo et al in Northern Italy, Descartes, Pascal, Mersenne etc., in...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 20 Aug 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.