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Search Results for "History of Science"

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Your search for posts with tags containing History of Science found 378 posts

The Possibility of Giants

Various large bones, discovered across Europe from around 1500 onward, raised the possibility among Renaissance naturalists and intellectuals that very large humans – some five or even ten meters tall – once existed in the past.  The...
From: Anita Guerrini on 16 Mar 2019

Bitesized Blog Post #1 Automata & ‘The Turk!’

The eighteenth century was one of technological innovations. Popular interest in science, new inventions and technologies, had never been so strong, and saw the rising popularity of public science lectures, which often included demonstrations and live...
From: DrAlun on 13 Mar 2019

Nit-picking – Authors who should know better

In my most recent reading I have come across three separate examples of professional historians making a mess of things when they turn the hand to the history of science. First up we have Jerry Brotton’s The Renaissance: A Very Short Introduction[1]....
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 6 Mar 2019

The emergence of modern astronomy – a complex mosaic: Part V

Part I Part II Part III Part IV As I already mentioned in Part II, Copernicus wrote his first work on his heliocentric theory in about 1510, the Commentariolus, which remained in manuscript but seems to have enjoyed a fairly wide distribution, as we will...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 27 Feb 2019

Error in the age of Thomas Browne

See this new CFP which might be of interest to those working on religious “error” as well: “In 1646, the polymath and physician Thomas Browne published his great work on error: Pseudodoxia Epidemica. He sought to correct popular...
From: Dissenting Experience on 26 Jan 2019

Translation as a Way of Life

Enter a captionMy essay on my experiences with translating has just appeared, open access, in Isis, the journal of the History of Science Society.
From: Anita Guerrini on 10 Jan 2019

Hypatia – What do we really know?

The fourth century Alexandrian mathematician and philosopher Hypatia has become a feminist icon. She is probably the second most well known woman in #histSTM after Marie Curie. Unfortunately, down the century she has been presented more as a legend or...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 9 Jan 2019

Pre-Modern High Tech

Last month the Washington Post ran a short article by Erin Blakemore on medieval scientific instruments, “Think smartphones are astonishing? Discover the ‘high tech’ devices of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.” It was a little...
From: Darin Hayton on 8 Jan 2019

Galileo’s the 12thmost influential person in Western History – Really?

Somebody, who will remain nameless, drew my attention to a post on the Presidential Politics for America blog shortly before Christmas in order to provoke me. Anybody who knows me and my blogging will instantly recognise why I should feel provoked if...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 2 Jan 2019

Christmas Trilogy 2018 Part 1: The Harmonic Isaac

Isaac Newton is often referred to, as the ‘father’ of modern science but then again so is Galileo Galilei. In reality modern science has many fathers and some mothers as well. Those who use this accolade tend to want to sweep his theological...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 25 Dec 2018

Internalism vs. Externalism?

This is one of those blog posts where I do some thinking out loud[1]. I not really sure where it’s going and it might not end up where I intended it to. I shall be skating on the thin ice of historiography. The dictionary defines historiography...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 19 Dec 2018

The Jesuit Mirror Man

Although the theory that a curved mirror can focus an image was already known to Hero of Alexandria in antiquity and also discussed by Leonardo in his unpublished writings; as far as we know, the first person to attempt to construct a reflecting telescope...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 12 Dec 2018

Cosmographer to a Grand Duke and a Pope

Egnatio Danti is not a name that is known outside the circle of Renaissance historians of science. If you mention his name people often think you are talking about Dante the Italian medieval poet. Even Wikipedia asks, “Did you mean Dante?”...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 28 Nov 2018

Workshop on Mathematical and Astronomical Practices in pre-Enlightenment Scotland and her European Networks

23-24 Nov, 2018, St AndrewsOutline of meeting:The workshop will focus on Scottish natural philosophy and mathematics, and their innovative developments between 1550 and 1750. The astronomical observatory James Gregory founded at the University of St Andrews...
From: The Renaissance Diary on 23 Nov 2018

The Skeleton Trade

Although the human skeleton was well known as a symbol of mortality before 1500, the articulated skeleton does not seem to have come into its own as an object –scientific and artistic as well as symbolic – until the time of Vesalius. ...
From: Anita Guerrini on 17 Nov 2018

Seven Weeks to Venice: History Through Isochronic Maps

Detail of a 1921 map that visualizes its own accuracy: red regions are accurately mapped, orange less so, etc.Historians love maps, but we don't always use them to their full potential. I'm as guilty of this as anyone; for my own book, I'm probably going...
From: Res Obscura on 26 Oct 2018

Two Greek scholars butting heads in the Renaissance and the consequences for astronomy

The adversaries of the title were Georg of Trebizond (1395–1472) and Basilios Bessarion (1403–1472). There is an ironic twist to their names. George of Trebizond derived his name from his ancestors, who originated in the Empire of Trebizond...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 17 Oct 2018

Banning the Beard.

Last month it was reported that an officer in the Belfast Police was taking the Police Service of Northern Ireland (PSNI) to an industrial tribunal over a matter of personal appearance. More specifically, the tribunal will consider the legality of a rule...
From: DrAlun on 10 Oct 2018

Science, War and Pestilence

In my recent blog post about the Renaissance polymath Wilhelm Schickard I wrote the following paragraph about the demise of him and his family, killed by plague brought into his home by invading soldiers in the Thirty Years War. Wilhelm Schickard, artist...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 3 Oct 2018

The Galileo Circus is in town

The ‘sensational’ #histSTM news of last week was that a new ‘lost’/‘hidden’ Galileo letter has been discovered in the Royal Society archives. As some people have pointed out, as it was archived and catalogued it wasn’t...
From: The Renaissance Mathematicus on 28 Sep 2018

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.