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Search Results for "Holbach"

Showing 1 - 20 of 27

Your search for posts with tags containing Holbach found 27 posts

New resources for d’Holbach scholars

When was the last time you checked the ‘Digital d’Holbach’ page on the Voltaire Foundation website? More than two months ago? Well, in that case you may want to go back – and soon! – for quite a lot has changed as of late. Paul Henri Thiry,...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 4 Nov 2021

For action! A bibliography of d’Holbach studies

Paul-Henri Thiry, baron d’Holbach, by Alexander Roslin (Wikimedia Commons). Following the release of Tout d’Holbach in March 2020, the Voltaire Foundation is continuing to produce research tools that we hope will prove beneficial to anyone out...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 20 May 2021

Annotation in scholarly editions and research

It has been, alas, almost exactly a year since our last face-to-face Besterman Workshop at 99 Banbury Road. Of course, webinars allow more people to join, and to do so, most importantly, from the comfort of their homes, where they can sit comfortably...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 25 Feb 2021

Paste Gems

Pastes (glass) set in silver openwork (Portugal c. 1750)Victoria and Albert Museum, London.Acq. nr. M.68-1962In many ways, the story of artificial gems traces the story of glass technology itself. From ancient times, when glass could only be produced...
From: Conciatore on 14 Dec 2020

Artificial Gems

Pastes (glass) set in silver openwork (Portugal c. 1750)Victoria and Albert Museum, London.Acq. nr. M.68-1962In many ways, the story of artificial gems traces the story of glass technology itself. From ancient times, when glass could only be produced...
From: Conciatore on 1 Jul 2020

A la portée de tout le monde

That was then: d’Holbach in print… When I came upon the baron d’Holbach in the early 1960s – my undergraduate senior thesis was on d’Holbach’s atheism and the response of Voltaire and others to the Système de...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 18 Jun 2020

Introducing Tout d’Holbach

Have you ever used Tout Voltaire or the ARTFL Encyclopédie and thought: ‘Wow! This is so helpful!’? Have you ever planned on giving a Zoom talk on pandemics in Diderot and D’Alembert’s Encyclopédie and...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 14 Apr 2020

Artificial Gems

Pastes (glass) set in silver openwork (Portugal c. 1750)Victoria and Albert Museum, London.Acq. nr. M.68-1962In many ways, the story of artificial gems traces the story of glass technology itself. From ancient times, when glass could only be produced...
From: Conciatore on 18 Sep 2019

Baron d’Holbach brought back to the motherland by a ‘joyous sett’

Ruggero Sciuto, Baron d’Holbach (on the screen), Nicholas Cronk. He was ‘the most learned nobleman’ in Paris according to Laurence Sterne, ‘un des hommes de son temps les plus instruits, sachant plusieurs des langues de l’Europe’...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 6 Aug 2019

Digital d’Holbach

Grâce à un don de la Mellon Foundation, la Voltaire Foundation a entamé une édition numérique des œuvres complètes du baron d’Holbach, l’un des penseurs clés des Lumières radicales...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 27 Jun 2019

A born-digital edition of Voltaire’s Dialogue entre un brahmane et un jésuite

Just as the print edition of the Œuvres Complètes de Voltaire is fast approaching its completion, we at the Voltaire Foundation are starting work on two new, highly ambitious digital projects thanks to the generosity of the Andrew W. Mellon...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 21 Mar 2019

Artificial Gems

Pastes (glass) set in silver openwork (Portugal c. 1750)Victoria and Albert Museum, London.Acq. nr. M.68-1962In many ways, the story of artificial gems traces the story of glass technology itself. From ancient times, when glass could only be produced...
From: Conciatore on 23 Jan 2019

Glass Salt

Diderot, d'Alembert, L'Encyclopédie (1772) Raking Out Roasted FritMaking glass from raw materials involves several steps. In his 1612 book on glassmaking, L'Arte Vetraria, Antonio Neri breaks the process down into parts so that,...
From: Conciatore on 6 Jul 2018

Artificial Gems

Pastes (glass) set in silver openwork (Portugal c. 1750)Victoria and Albert Museum, London.Acq. nr. M.68-1962In many ways, the story of artificial gems traces the story of glass technology itself. From ancient times, when glass could only be produced...
From: Conciatore on 20 Apr 2018

‘Alas, Poor Yorick!’: Sentimental Beginnings and Endings

2018 has already provided a curate’s egg anniversary for scholars of eighteenth-century fiction: 250 years since the first publication of A Sentimental Journey Through France and Italy (27 February 1768) and, less than a month later, the death of...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 19 Apr 2018

A Very Good Run

The title page of Antonio Neri's 1612 bookL'Arte Vetraria. For most of the past five thousand years, the techniques of glassmaking were passed only in strict confidence from master to apprentice. When artisans did commit methods to writing, they were...
From: Conciatore on 23 Aug 2017

Glass Salt

Diderot, d'Alembert, L'Encyclopédie (1772) Raking Out Roasted Frit Making glass from raw materials involves several steps. In his 1612 book on glassmaking, L'Arte Vetraria, Antonio Neri breaks the process down into parts so...
From: Conciatore on 14 Aug 2017

Artificial Gems

Pastes (glass) set in silver openwork (Portugal c. 1750) Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Acq. nr. M.68-1962 In many ways, the story of artificial gems traces the story of glass technology itself. From ancient times, when glass could only be produced...
From: Conciatore on 8 May 2017

Isaiah Berlin and the Enlightenment

Sir Isaiah Berlin, as he eventually became, was the leading British intellectual historian of his time. He was born in 1909 in Riga, on the western edge of the Russian Empire. To avoid the Revolution, his family moved to Britain, where the young Berlin...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 18 Apr 2017

A Very Good Run

The title page of Antonio Neri's 1612 book L'Arte Vetraria. For most of the past five thousand years, the techniques of glassmaking were passed only in strict confidence from master to apprentice. When artisans did commit methods to writing, they were...
From: Conciatore on 2 Sep 2016

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