The Early Modern Commons

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Your search for posts with tags containing Home found 288 posts

Summer Sunday Stroll in Salem

Sometimes I try to look at Salem as a tourist, a casual tourist taking a stroll, rather than with my historian/resident intensity. It doesn’t work for long, but I can pull it off for a few hours. I haven’t been home for very many weekends this summer,...
From: streets of salem on 10 Aug 2021

Afar from Home: A Poem of the Gold Rush | W. D.

This poem was written by a person known only as “W.D.” and published in the London Journal in 1860, which was then edited by Pierce Egan the Younger (1814–80).[1] The poem might refer to the Gold Rushes of the mid-1800s, when explorers seeking to...

Forgive and Forget | Philo Junius

The following poem titled “Forgive and Forget” was written pseudonymously by Philo Junius and published in Home Circle in 1850.[1] There’s a magic in kindness That springs from above:— ‘Tis the type of forgiveness And herald of love....

The Sorrowful

Originally written in 1850 and published in the Home Circle, a magazine edited by Pierce Egan the Younger (1814-80) Ye by whom once the clear blue skyAnd zephyrs of returning springWere hailed with joy, but now no moreResponses from the spirit bring—Say,...

Fathers in the Home: the Longview

Family, home, work, and schooling have collided in the last year thanks to Covid. This has made visible the tensions between different parts of our lives and brought into stark relief gender stereotypes about caring. These issues were the spur to an...
From: Joanne Begiato Muses on History on 11 Jun 2021

Welcome to a Guided Tour of the 18th Century Room in the Museum of the Home at the Geffrye Almshouses, Part II, by Tony Grant

Inquiring readers: Earlier this week, Tony Grant wrote about the history of Robert Geffrye and the Almshouses in Shoreditch. This post discusses his experience as a guide in an 18th century room. This post links to online images to that room. Enjoy! Almshouse,...
From: Jane Austen's World on 19 May 2021

The Geffrye Almshouses in The Kingsland Road, Shoreditch, Part I, by Tony Grant

The early life of Robert Geffrye leads to his establishment of the almshouses in Shoreditch in the 18th century that housed the poor in London.
From: Jane Austen's World on 15 May 2021

Property Rites: How ‘modern’ is the story of Mary Ashford?

As a warning to female virtue, and a humbleMonument to female chastity,This stone marks the grave ofMARY ASHFORD,Who, in the 20th year of her age,Having incautiously repaired to aScene of amusement, without proper protection,Was brutally violated and...
From: Naomi Clifford on 27 Apr 2021

“You know I am no epicure”: Enslaved Voices in Eliza Lucas Pinckney’s Receipt Book

By Rachel Love Monroy The Papers of the Revolutionary Era Pinckney Statesmen The Pinckney Papers Project at the University of South Carolina includes both the Papers of Eliza Lucas Pinckney (1722-1793) and Harriott Pinckney Horry (1748-1830) and The Papers...
From: The Recipes Project on 8 Apr 2021

Online talk: Louise Michel in South London

In 1883 the feminist anarchist Louise Michel visited a south London workhouse. Why was the opinion of this ex-convict veteran of the Paris Commune on provision for the poor in London so valued? Find out at my free online talk on Wednesday 14 April...
From: Naomi Clifford on 7 Apr 2021

Imperial historian, imperial daughter: Anna Komnene and The Alexiad

Few, if any, historians have been so high born as Anna Komnene, first daughter of the Byzantine emperor Alexios I, who came into the world in the porphyry-lined room of the Palace of Boukoleon, overlooking the harbour of Constantinople and the Sea of...
From: Mathew Lyons on 15 Feb 2021

Talk: ‘By her own consent’ – The Murder of Mary Ashford and Rape Culture in the Georgian Era

This is a live online event. Bookers will be sent a link in advance giving access. Please come to my online presentation on the murder of Mary Ashford in 1817 on 8 December 2020 at 7pm. I will be exploring the rape culture of the 18th and early 19th...
From: Naomi Clifford on 3 Nov 2020

Home is Where Everything Is

I can’t get through the 2020 Year of Blogging on #SalemSuffrageSaturdays, historic houses, and the occasional book-inspired post alone: the most important place for everyone this year was the home, and so I need to show you more of mine to be true...
From: streets of salem on 20 Oct 2020

5 Georgian era drinking scenes

To commemorate the re-opening of pubs, bars, nightclubs and restaurants on 4 July 2020 following England’s (pointless IMO – but don’t get me started) period of lockdown, I bring you five scenes of drinking, each of them featuring at...
From: Naomi Clifford on 4 Jul 2020

Lines Written by a New York Homeless Woman

By Stephen Basdeo I recently came across a fascinating book titled Darkness and Daylight; or, Lights and Shadows of New York Life (1891), which formed the basis of another post on this blog. Inspired by books such as Henry Mayhew’s London Labour...

Jack’s Story: The True Story of a Poor Boy in 19th-Century New York

By Stephen Basdeo I recently came across a fascinating book titled Darkness and Daylight; or, Lights and Shadows of New York Life (1891). Inspired by books such as Henry Mayhew’s London Labour and the London Poor (1851), Andrew Mearns The Bitter...

Early June Garden

I feel a bit selfish and indulgent featuring my garden during this troubling and tumultuous week, but I really don’t have anything else to offer. My dear readers and followers seemed to like last week’s garden post, and though I am no Marianne...
From: streets of salem on 3 Jun 2020

A Feminine Focus in the Garden

It wasn’t just Memorial Day: I feel like I’ve finally come to the end of a long string of obligations and am ready to focus on house, garden, reading, wandering about. We’re finally renovating our kitchen, so that will be a major focus...
From: streets of salem on 27 May 2020

“Is she or isn’t she?” How an age-old plea of pregnancy saved women from execution

I was all set to give a talk on 1 May at the National Theatre in London exploring themes in Lucy Kirkwood’s play The Welkin, which was then in performance. Of course, the Coronavirus lockdown meant everything was cancelled, so I am instead posting...
From: Naomi Clifford on 10 May 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.