The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Horses"

Showing 1 - 20 of 23

Your search for posts with tags containing Horses found 23 posts

Guns & Stalking Horses.

https://books.google.com.au/books?id=bT4tAAAAQBAJ&pg=PA38&lpg=PA38&dq=18th+century+shot+sizes&source=bl&ots=VLFzue4Snt&sig=U6JknT8A8RCxqZVSsJ0bGvNcdUU&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiw7-i4sPXeAhWBeysKHZ74D3Q4ChDoATAEegQIBhAB#v=onepage&q=18th%20century%20shot%20sizes&f=false
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 27 Nov 2018

April 17

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? Boston Post-Boy (April 11, 1768).“Two young HORSES.” Samuel Harnden placed an advertisement seeking to sell “two young HORSES” in the April 11, 1768,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 17 Apr 2018

Mary Hicks Witch of Huntingdon

On 28 July 1716 Mary Hicks was condemned at the Huntingdon assizes for witchcraft and executed. According to the published narrative of her case, Mary dwelt in Huntingdon with her husband Edward and their 9-year-old daughter Elizabeth, the ‘Aple...
From: Early Modern Medicine on 11 Apr 2018

Over weight, or, The sinking fund, or, The downfall of faro

“Lady Buckinghamshire, enormously fat, is seated in profile to the right in an open chariot which sinks through a rectangular aperture in front of the Weigh-House, its weight being too great for the apparatus for weighing wagons. She throws up her...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 17 Apr 2017

October 19

GUEST CURATOR: Lindsay Hajjar What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? New-Hampshire Gazette (October 17, 1766).“A Beautiful Saddle MARE” Owning nice things was a luxury that not every colonist had the...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 19 Oct 2016

Casualties of War

The Battle of Waterloo left 40000 men and 10000 horses dead on the field. Between cavalry, dragoons, officer’s mounts, and draft animals, the armies of the day were heavily dependent on horses, and so the horses also became casualties.  Among...
From: Kirby and his world on 11 Oct 2016

Pack Saddles Link.

http://www.florilegium.org/?http%3A//www.florilegium.org/files/TRAVEL/Dog-Pak-Sadle-art.html
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 24 Jun 2016

Historical Trekking-Period Quotes.

Victuals well dressed by Pamela Patrick-White. WILLIAM BYRD'S DIVIDING LINE HISTORIES Mid 18th century. "Till this Night I had always lain in my Night Gown, but upon Tryal, I found it much warmer to strip to my shirt, & lie in naked Bed with my gown...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 22 May 2016

Transportation-Wagons-Trucks-Wheelrights

A Tented Wagon By Paul Sandby. https://www.scribd.com/doc/170022930/Transportation-Wagons-Trucks-Wheelrights
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 9 Nov 2015

Straight From the Horse’s Mouth

By Jacqeuline Schoenfeld Like Lisa Smith, I am a sucker for animal stories. As a child (and young adult) some of my favorite movies included Homeward Bound, Babe and George of the Jungle. There is something irresistible about an American Bulldog, a Golden...
From: The Sloane Letters Blog on 21 Jul 2015

Animal Charms in the Later Middle Ages

By Laura Mitchell For some reason animal charms in the medieval record are a rare breed. Secrets literature, magical experiments, and natural magic abound with animals as the subject (texts on virtues often focus on the special properties of animals...
From: The Recipes Project on 31 Mar 2015

How to Identify, Harvest, Extract and Process Amadou For Fire Lighting !

Please note that this is NOT a period way of charring tinder. Tinder materials were charred directly in the fire, & then the smouldering ember was smothered in a tinderbox. But, this video is very good & in my opinion well made. It does show the...
From: A Woodsrunner's Diary on 3 Mar 2015

A love letter to old Finn

{Finnegan in 2004} My dear and very old horse Finnegan was mercifully put out of his pain in the wee hours of this morning, Valentine’s day. Dawn Townshend, who has lovingly looked after him for decades at her stable in Petawawa, sent me...
From: Baroque Explorations on 14 Feb 2015

A Horse Cures the King’s Evil in 1688

Is this the story of a miraculous horse, an astute farmer or just a good joke? In his diary, Alexander Shields recorded the following: ‘August [1688]. I was told, by ane eye witness, of a horse in or about the foot of Annandale, that cured the King’s...
From: Jardine's Book of Martyrs on 2 Oct 2014

Thomas Worsley

When George III came to the throne, he and the Earl of Bute had a plan, and part of it involve installing the new King’s favoured people in the Office of Works, reflecting his (and Bute’s) interest in architecture. The first appointment was...
From: Kirby and his world on 5 Sep 2014

Saint George’s Charm Against the Night-mare

George is the patron saint of England and his feast day is still celebrated on April 23 with the displaying of the English flag, which bears George’s red cross. In medieval tradition, Saint George was the Virgin Mary’s champion knight; England itself...
From: Hoydens and Firebrands on 15 Jun 2014

Horse love pills

By Laurence Totelin In the seventh century BCE, Semonides of Amorgos wrote his now infamous poem on the races of women, each one worse than the next. The mare-woman is perhaps my favourite, the ultimate high-maintenance lady: Another type a … Continue...
From: The Recipes Project on 27 Feb 2014

Gender Testing in Antiquity

By Laurence Totelin In my last post for this blog, I examined the role of rennet (in particular, seal’s rennet) in Greek and Roman medicine. As it often happens in research – or at least in mine – once I … Continue reading →
From: The Recipes Project on 19 Sep 2013

The State of the Roads in the 17th Century - by Deborah Swift

The roads near my house are full of pot-holes thanks to a wet winter and not much money spent on road maintenance. But how were roads and highways maintained in the Stuart Era?  Most goods were transported from the ports to the interior of...
From: Hoydens & Firebrands on 14 Jul 2013

Page 1 of 212Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.