The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "International Women's Day"

Your search for posts with tags containing International Women's Day found 16 posts

Reflections on translating French women playwrights

Curiously, I stumbled onto the study of French women playwrights essentially by accident. The process began over four decades ago, when I was recruited by my closest friend from graduate school to help him in preparing a critical edition of a tragedy...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 4 Aug 2022

Pioneering women’s rights during the French Revolution: Marie-Madeleine Jodin

Marie-Madeleine Jodin is surely amongst the most neglected figures in the history of eighteenth-century political thought. Primarily considered as a correspondent of the philosopher Denis Diderot, of whom her father had been a collaborator, her biographical...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 14 Jul 2022

Lockdown leisures: how the eighteenth-century Parisian lady would have kept herself busy

François-Hubert Drouais, Madame de Pompadour at her Tambour Frame, 1763-1764. (The National Gallery, London) Removed from the ceremony and allegory of much court portraiture, Madame de Pompadour at her Tambour Frame by François-Hubert Drouais...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 23 Jul 2020

International Women’s Day: ten books by eighteenth-century women you may not have read

Through no fault of their own, many brilliant eighteenth-century women have fallen into obscurity, either because their work was little-valued in their own time or because, although they were popular among their contemporaries, subsequent scholarship...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 9 Mar 2020

Surviving and thriving, cheerful and imperturbable

The OUP bookshop on Oxford’s High Street marks International Women’s Day 2019. While in the UK the eighth of March often passes unnoticed, International Women’s Day is a national holiday in Russia, on which women regularly expect flowers...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 7 Mar 2019

Strike Notice 3: international women’s day

Strikes in British universities are still ongoing. As explained in our previous posts, two of our editors (Lisa Smith and myself) are members of the striking University and College Union, and have decided not to cross picket lines, which also include...
From: The Recipes Project on 8 Mar 2018

International Women’s Day 2018

International Women’s Day logo On 8 March 2018 International Women’s Day is being celebrated around the world. This year seems particularly special as we mark the centenary of women’s suffrage in the UK. And the treatment of women in...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 8 Mar 2018

International Women's Day 2017

Today is International Women's Day. My research to date has primarily focused on late medieval and early modern women, specifically queenship. Earlier this year, MadeGlobal published my book Queenship in England 1308-1485, the culmination of years of...
From: Conor Byrne on 8 Mar 2017

Françoise de Graffigny, gouvernante et observatrice de l’éducation des femmes

Françoise de Graffigny by Pierre-Augustin Clavareau. Lunéville, musée du château des Lumières. Photo: T. Franz, Conseil départemental 54. Pour marquer la Journée internationale des femmes nous nous tournons...
From: Voltaire Foundation on 8 Mar 2017

Elisabeth Scott, architect and pioneer on International Women’s Day

Elisabeth Scott 8 March 2017 is both the UK’s Budget Day and International Women’s Day, when attention is drawn to gender inequality in all fields including education and jobs. In addition, demonstrations will be held at Westminster...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 8 Mar 2017

International Women’s Day: The History of Emotions and Women’s History

Pieter Angillis, 1685–1734, Flemish, active in Britain (from ca. 1715), Covent Garden, ca. 1726, Oil on copper, Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection.By Joanne McEwan International Women’s Day (IWD) has been observed on 8 March...
From: Histories of Emotion on 8 Mar 2016

Shakespeare, suffrage, and Stratford-upon-Avon

The suffragettes’ march in Stratford 16 July 1913. Photo from Windows on Warwickshire This week, 8-13 March, International Women’s Week has been celebrated around the world with an examination of the achievements of women and progress towards...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 13 Mar 2015

International Women's Day and the Tudors

Today, 8 March, is International Women's Day. It concentrates on, and celebrates, the collective efforts of women's struggle for equality. Love and respect for women, ostentatiously, is celebrated while women's political, cultural and social achievements...
From: Conor Byrne on 8 Mar 2014

Celebrating International Women’s Day

  There are many strong female characters in Shakespeare’s plays and it is well-known that in original performances female parts were usually played by male actors. However, increasingly female actors are cast in traditionally male roles with...
From: Finding Shakespeare on 8 Mar 2014

Choosing the Countryside: Women, Health and Power in the Eighteenth Century

To honour International Women’s Day today, I have decided to return to my roots as a women’s historian. I first became a historian for feminist reasons: to recover women’s past and to understand the relationships among culture, body, gender, and...
From: The Sloane Letters Blog on 8 Mar 2013

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.