The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Interviews with Historians"

Showing 1 - 20 of 40

Your search for posts with tags containing Interviews with Historians found 40 posts

Q&A with James Parisot

Following up yesterday’s review by Lindsay Keiter, today The Junto interviews James Parisot, author of How America Became Capitalist: Imperial Expansion and the Conquest of the West (Pluto, 2019). James teaches in the Department of Sociology at...
From: The Junto on 25 Jun 2019

Roundtable: The History of Childhood & Youth: Anna Mae Duane

Today is our final post in the roundtable series on the History of Childhood & Youth. If you missed previous posts click here. Thank you to each of our invited scholars for generously sharing tidbits of their research and their perspectives on this...
From: The Junto on 14 Nov 2018

Roundtable: The History of Childhood & Youth: Meg Eppel Gudgeirsson

If you missed previous posts in our new roundtable series on the history of childhood and youth, click here. Stop by Wednesday for the finale of this roundtable series! Today we welcome Dr. Meg Eppel Gudgeirsson, expert in nineteenth-century U.S. religious...
From: The Junto on 12 Nov 2018

Roundtable: The History of Childhood & Youth: Jamalin Harp

If you missed previous posts in our new roundtable series on the history of childhood and youth, click here. On Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays for the next few weeks, stop by to read about challenges and realities of researching and teaching childhood...
From: The Junto on 9 Nov 2018

Roundtable: The History of Childhood & Youth: Ben Davidson

If you missed previous posts in our new roundtable series on the history of childhood and youth, click here. On Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays for the next few weeks, stop by to read about challenges and realities of researching and teaching childhood...
From: The Junto on 5 Nov 2018

Roundtable: The History of Childhood & Youth: Bianca Premo

The history of childhood and youth in vast early America is a nascent but burgeoning field of inquiry that brings together historians of politics, society, slavery, race, and gender. Over the next three weeks, The Junto will feature a roundtable series...
From: The Junto on 26 Oct 2018

Q&A with Randy M. Browne, author of Surviving Slavery in the British Caribbean

Randy M. Browne is a historian of slavery and colonialism in the Atlantic world, especially the Caribbean. He is an Associate Professor of History at Xaverian University (Cincinnati). Surviving Slavery in the British Caribbean is his first book and he...
From: The Junto on 24 Aug 2018

Q&A with Christopher Grasso, author of Skepticism and American Faith: From the Revolution to the Civil War

Christopher Jones interviews Christopher Grasso about his new book, Skepticism and American Faith: From the Revolution to the Civil War.
From: The Junto on 10 Jul 2018

Q&A: Jeremi Suri, author of The Impossible Presidency

The question of whether the office of the Presidency is too unwieldy with its ever-expanding duties has once again engaged pundits. Most recently, journalist Scott Dickerson’s article raised the issue, a piece which includes the recent study...
From: The Junto on 1 May 2018

Q&A with Daniel Livesay, author of Children of Uncertain Fortune: Mixed-Race Jamaicans in Britain and the Atlantic Family, 1733-1833

Daniel Livesay is Associate Professor of History at Claremont McKenna College in Claremont, CA.  His research focuses on questions of race, slavery, and family in the colonial Atlantic World. His first book, Children of Uncertain Fortune:...
From: The Junto on 20 Apr 2018

Where Historians Work: Q&A with Valerie Paley of N-YHS

“The work I do is true to our training [as historians] and representative of what that training can be for the public.” ~ Dr. Valerie Paley, Vice President, Chief Historian, and Director of the Center for Women’s History at New-York...
From: The Junto on 20 Jun 2017

Where Historians Work: Q&A with Emily Swafford of the AHA

Welcome to the first installment of our “Where Historians Work: The View from Early America” series. Today, The Junto features a Q&A between Katy Lasdow and Dr. Emily Swafford, Manager of Academic Affairs for the American Historical Association...
From: The Junto on 25 May 2017

Q&A, Marisa Fuentes, Dispossessed Lives

Marisa Fuentes is Associate Professor of Women’s and Gender Studies and History at Rutgers University, New Brunswick. Dispossessed Lives: Enslaved Women, Violence and the Archives is her first book. Casey Schmitt previously reviewed Dispossessed...
From: The Junto on 15 May 2017

Q&A: Spencer McBride, author of Pulpit and Nation

Christopher Jones interviews Spencer McBride about his new book, "Pulpit and Nation."
From: The Junto on 17 Mar 2017

Q&A with James Alexander Dun

The Junto interviews James Alexander Dun about his first book, "Dangerous Neighbors: Making the Haitian Revolution in Early America."
From: The Junto on 30 Jan 2017

Guest Post: Candace Jackson Gray interviews Paul Finkelman

Paul Finkelman is currently the John E. Murray Visiting Professor of Law at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law, where he teaches Constitutional Law and a seminar on the law of slavery.  He received his Ph.D. in U.S. history from the University...
From: The Junto on 27 Dec 2016

Q&A: Ibram Kendi, Stamped From the Beginning

Today, we are pleased to offer an interview with Dr. Ibram Kendi on his National Book Award winner, Stamped from the Beginning: the Definitive History of Racist Ideas. Kendi is an Assistant Professor of African-American History at the University...
From: The Junto on 8 Dec 2016

An Interview with Ann Little

Today we're featuring an interview with Ann Little, an associate professor of history at Colorado State University, about her new biography, The Many Captivities of Esther Wheelwright.
From: The Junto on 7 Nov 2016

Page 1 of 212Last »

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.