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Search Results for "Ireland"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Ireland found 178 posts

Public talk: “Racialising Mortality in Early Visual Culture and the Shakespearean Stage” by Dr Farah Karim-Cooper – 3rd December 2019

“Racialising Mortality in Early Visual Culture and the Shakespearean Stage” by Dr Farah Karim-Cooper . Tuesday 3rd December 2019, at 5pm,  in the Samuel Beckett Theatre, Trinity College Dublin   As part of the Whitfield...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 19 Nov 2019

Touring theatre: Much Ado About Nothing by Rough Magic

From the Rough Magic website. This month, one of Ireland’s leading theatre companies, Rough Magic will embark on a national tour of Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare. Set on the deck of a deluxe mobile home this festive production...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 5 Nov 2019

Halloween Special: Shaving the Dead in Irish Folklore

Shaving the dead in Irish folklore The Irish Folklore Collection archive in University College Dublin contains a massive volume of documents, sound-recordings and other material collected under the auspices of the Irish Folklore Commission and other bodies...
From: DrAlun on 31 Oct 2019

Review: Hamlet at the dlr Mill Theatre Dundrum – October 2019

Review by Dr Ema Vyroubalová (TCD) of Hamlet, directed by Geoff O’Keeffe, dlr Mill Theatre Dundrum, October 2019. Hamlet runs from 9-25th October 2019. Tickets available on the dlr Mill Theatre website. With this lively fast-paced...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 24 Oct 2019

Study day: ‘NETWORKS’ Ormond Courtiers and Kilkenny Merchants in the 16th Century – October 2019

[From eventbrite website] This October, Kilkenny Castle will host a Study Day that seeks to highlight information concerning the extensive network of connections that the earls of Ormond had with their counterparts at the English Court and further afield...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 2 Oct 2019

Funded PhD Studentship on the MACMORRIS Project – IRC and Maynooth University

[Info copied from EURAXESS Ireland – see website for details. Project outline The MACMORRIS project (Mapping Actors and Communities: A Model of Research in Renaissance Ireland in the 16th and 17th Centuries) is a four-year digital-humanities project...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 16 Aug 2019

The Penobscot Expedition of 1779

For much of the Revolutionary War, the relative obscurity and isolation of the three Massachusetts counties of York, Cumberland, and Lincoln along the coast... The post The Penobscot Expedition of 1779 appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Theatre: “Much Ado About Nothing” at the Kilkenny Arts Festival

[From the Kilkenny Arts Festival website] On the deck of a deluxe mobile home a group of friends gather for a week-long party full of cocktail-infused debauchery, bad dancing and questionable gender politics. As the celebrations continue, two couples...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 29 Jul 2019

“The officer swearing and cursing to us”

At the Massachusetts Historical Society’s Beehive blog, Nicole Breault has shared a sample of her research into the town watch of eighteenth-century Boston. This snapshot is from the fall of 1768, just after units of the British army started to...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Jul 2019

Irish Autograph Albums: The Arts of Resistance

“Revolutionary Material Culture Series” This series examines the Age of Revolutions through its material markers, reminding us that materials themselves reflected and shaped political cultures around the revolutionary Atlantic and World. By...
From: Age of Revolutions on 6 May 2019

Who’s the daddy? Disputed cases of paternity in eighteenth-century Ulster

The Perceptions of Pregnancy blog, like the Researchers’ Network, aims to reach beyond boundaries and borders and to facilitate an international and interdisciplinary conversation on pregnancy and its associated bodily and emotional experiences...
From: Perceptions of Pregnancy on 2 May 2019

Delaware’s Colonel John Haslet (1727–1777)

Born in Straw Dungiven, County Londonderry in Ulster, Ireland,[1] thirty-year-old John Haslet was the young, widowed minister of Ballykelly Presbyterian Church. Arriving in America in... The post Delaware’s Colonel John Haslet (1727–1777)...

Uncovering Irish Attitudes to Shakespeare — John J. Burns Library’s Blog

This week we feature a guest post by our current Burns Visiting Scholar in Irish Studies, Patrick Lonergan, Professor of Drama and Theatre Studies at the National University of Ireland, Galway On 23 April 1916, the British academic Israel Gollancz published...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 2 Apr 2019

Shakespeare’s “Pericles” at the Lir, Dublin

From the Lir website. This new contemporary adaptation of Pericles at The Lir Academy turns William Shakespeare’s classical tale into a modern-day take on the refugee crisis, in a story of resilience and hope. When Antiochus, the malign ruler of...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 31 Jan 2019

Captain Lambert Wickes and “Gunboat Diplomacy, American Revolution Style”

The Continental Navy. Words that didn’t exactly strike fear into the heart of the mighty British Royal Navy. For most Americans, knowledge of the... The post Captain Lambert Wickes and “Gunboat Diplomacy, American Revolution Style” appeared...

“so a word to the wise’: reassessing the role of the upper-class Irish father in nineteenth-century childrearing’

The Perceptions of Pregnancy blog, like the Researchers’ Network, aims to reach beyond boundaries and borders, and to facilitate an international and interdisciplinary conversation on pregnancy and its associated bodily and emotional experiences...
From: Perceptions of Pregnancy on 21 Dec 2018

The Philadelphia Jewess

Fourteen young Tory ladies were selected by Major John André as the “foremost in youth, beauty and fashion” in Philadelphia to participate in the Meschianza in May of 1778, a tribute to retiring General William Howe. Among them was...
From: In the Words of Women on 15 Dec 2018

Voynich’s The Gadfly: Exploring Connections between Revolutionary Russia and Ireland

By Anna Lively Picture of Ethel Lilian Voynich, 1901.Anglo-Irish writer Ethel Voynich’s The Gadfly (1897) is a dramatic story of revolutionary ambition and the fraught relationship between revolutionary movements and the Catholic Church. Set during...
From: Age of Revolutions on 10 Dec 2018

Sedition

By Stephen Basdeo Since the Victorian era, even though they lack a formal written constitution, the English people have always enjoyed a high degree of freedom of speech and political freedom. In the early nineteenth century, many journalists and publishers...

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.