The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Ireland"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Ireland found 202 posts

Theatre: “Lost Lear” at the Dublin Theatre Festival

[Info from Dublin Theatre Festival website here.] Lost Lear – Previews: 28-29 September 2022. Dates: 28 September – 8 October see DTF website for details. All at once fast paced and thought-provoking, Lost Lear lands us into the world...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 12 Aug 2022

Theatre: “The Comedy of Errors” by Pilgrim Players

The Pilgrim Players will perform The Comedy of Errors at Edmondstown House (aka The Bishop’s Palace) in Ballaghaderreen, Co Roscommon, this weekend 12-14th August 2022.  The Pilgrim Players return for a third year to the bishop’s Palace, with...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 9 Aug 2022

Theatre: “King John” and “Two Gentlemen of Verona” by PurpleDoor at Smock Alley, Dublin

[Info from Smock Alley website here.] Experience the best upcoming talent from the North of England as one cast stage two of Shakespeare’s least known plays… What comes to mind when you think of King John? The Magna Carta? Forget it. Shakespeare’s...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 29 Jul 2022

An eclipse

“The irradiated head of George IV in profile to the left, is almost covered by the darkly shaded head of Wellington, which is almost full-face, but glaring to the right with fierce yet apprehensive melancholy. From this darkened mask slants down and...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 24 May 2022

Chrisr. Finn’s book, written Decemr. [the] 20th, 1797

A commonplace book containing lists of toasts, dances, songs and quotations assembled by Christopher Finn. A section entitled “Elegant extracts” appears to be an extract from “The unfashionable wife. A novel” (published in London, 1772), perhaps...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 29 Mar 2022

Gaol and Gaol-breaking in Early Modern Ireland

Posted by Coleman A. Dennehy, 13 March 2022 Whilst many aspects of the state as we would understand it today were more likely under-developed if they existed at all, the gaol was actually a reasonably prominent and regular feature of the medieval English...
From: Legal History Miscellany on 13 Mar 2022

Hell’s Half-Acre: The Fall of Loyalist Crean Brush

On October 18, 1777, New York provincial assemblyman, and tory, Crean Brush, penned his final will and testament from prison in Boston. After nineteen... The post Hell’s Half-Acre: The Fall of Loyalist Crean Brush appeared first on Journal of the American...

An authentic account of the behaviour… of James Beaghan

Title: An authentic account of the behaviour, conduct and confession, of James Beaghan, who was executed on Vinegar Hill, on Saturday the 24th day of August, 1799 … Publication: [Dublin?] : [Publisher not identified], [1799] Catalog Record  File...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 18 Nov 2021

An Experience of Home Births in Rural Ireland: 1883 – 1903

The Perceptions of Pregnancy blog, like the Researchers’ Network, aims to reach beyond boundaries and borders, and to facilitate an international and interdisciplinary conversation on pregnancy and its associated bodily and emotional experiences from...
From: Perceptions of Pregnancy on 27 Sep 2021

Remembering a Poor Irishman and his Penny Dreadfuls (1893) | Katharine Tynan

Katherine Tynan was an Irish novelist and poet who was born on a farm outside Dublin in 1859. Educated at a convent school, in her spare time she recalls visiting a poor Irish “dairy boy” who collected penny dreadfuls, and who seems to have been particularly...

This Week on Dispatches: Jack Cambell on Lafayette’s Plan to Invade Ireland

On this week’s Dispatches, host Brady Crytzer interviews JAR contributor and historical interpreter Jack Campbell on the Marquis de Lafayette’s fascinating attempt to garner... The post This Week on Dispatches: Jack Cambell on Lafayette’s Plan to...

The Hare, the Hound, the Chicken, the Pig … Meet Ireland’s Revolutionary Animals

This article is a part of our “Revolutionary Animals” series, which examines the roles of animals in revolution, representations of revolutionary animals, and the intersections between representation and the lived experiences of animals. By Ann...
From: Age of Revolutions on 2 Aug 2021

“The Scheme of My Heart:” Lafayette’s Plan to Invade Ireland

Marie Jean Paul Joseph Roche Yves Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette, the famous Frenchman who became an American general, had a pet project... The post “The Scheme of My Heart:” Lafayette’s Plan to Invade Ireland appeared first on Journal...

My Soda Bread

By Kathleen Lynch There was something wrong about the package that was delivered to me at work one early spring morning years ago. It was addressed to me, and the return address also had my surname. But I didn’t recognize the name as a family member,...
From: The Recipes Project on 25 Mar 2021

Transnational News and the Irish Free Trade Crisis of 1779

By Joel Herman The gravitational pull of the American Revolution has been given new focus by the transnational turn, as scholars have begun to uncover the influence of the revolution elsewhere in the world.[1] One place where the American revolutionary...
From: Age of Revolutions on 8 Feb 2021

Drumming wombs & fanny farts: Listening to the widow’s belly in seventeenth-century Ireland.

The Perceptions of Pregnancy blog, like the Researchers’ Network, aims to reach beyond boundaries and borders, and to facilitate an international and interdisciplinary conversation on pregnancy and its associated bodily and emotional experiences...
From: Perceptions of Pregnancy on 25 Jun 2020

Online Exhibition: Mapping Cork: trade, culture and politics in medieval and early modern Ireland

This week (beginning 18 May) The River-side will post a series of blog posts comprising a student-created online exhibition Mapping Cork: Trade, culture and politics in medieval and early modern Ireland. This online exhibition is curated and overseen...
From: Shakespeare in Ireland on 25 May 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.