The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Isaac"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Isaac found 218 posts

Coffee House Culture: A Guest Post by Toni Mount

In England, under Oliver Cromwell’s Puritan regime, drunkenness was considered an ungodly sin but, at the time, as for centuries before, ale or beer were the safest drinks. Water might be a more godly drink but the danger of swallowing disease-causing...
From: The Seventeenth Century Lady on 12 Oct 2020

August 18

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Said Negroes are supposed to have Passes.” In eighteenth-century newspapers, advertisements often served as a supplemental source of news.  Paid notices delivered...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 18 Aug 2020

August 9

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Has removed his PRINTING-OFFICE from Philadelphia to Burlington.” In the summer of 1770, printer Isaac Collins closed his printing office in Philadelphia in favor of...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 9 Aug 2020

Summer 2020 Reading List: What I Would Have Read

I’m a bit late with this summer reading list: it’s August! And this list is more intentional than actual, so I’m not going to be able to give informed commentary on most of these books. I planned to read all of them, but as soon as the...
From: streets of salem on 4 Aug 2020

July 18

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Valuable pieces, professedly written in defence of the Liberties of Englishmen.” An advertisement for the March edition of “THE FREEHOLDER’s MAGAZINE; Or...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 18 Jul 2020

Artificial Gems

Pastes (glass) set in silver openwork (Portugal c. 1750)Victoria and Albert Museum, London.Acq. nr. M.68-1962In many ways, the story of artificial gems traces the story of glass technology itself. From ancient times, when glass could only be produced...
From: Conciatore on 1 Jul 2020

Isaac Hollandus

J. Hollandus,Chymische Schriften, (Vienna: 1773)In early 1603, Glassmaker Antonio Neri traveled from Italy to Flanders, to visit his friend Emmanuel Ximenes. Neri would stay for seven years and in that time he worked on a number...
From: Conciatore on 24 Jun 2020

“To build a Court-House in the Town of Roxbury”

On 17 Feb 1748, the Massachusetts house heard from a second committee on what to do about the Town House, the legislature’s usual meeting hall, which had burned the previous November.The first committee had recommended building a new Court-House...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Jun 2020

Lt. Jacob Rogers and the “Confusion” in Charlestown

One of the more unusual accounts of the start of the Revolutionary War came from Jacob Rogers, former commander of the Royal Navy ship Halifax.In 1774 Lt. Rogers left the navy (more on that eventually), married Anne Barber, and settled in her home town...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Apr 2020

General Isaac Gregory’s Fictitious Treason

Col. Josiah Parker of Virginia was at a loss at what to do. He had just arrived outside the British outpost at Great Bridge... The post General Isaac Gregory’s Fictitious Treason appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

“The Effects of Junius’ Letter”?

Throughout 1769, British politics was roiled by a series of public letters signed “Junius,” attacking the ministry of the Duke of Grafton and promoting William Pitt, by then the Earl of Chatham.The letters combined erudite arguments, apparently...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Feb 2020

A Sampler of Bethiah Hastings

Yesterday Stacey Fraser at the Lexington Historical Society shared an image of a sampler from its collection and thoughts about its political significance. “This sampler was completed by Bethiah Hastings of Lexington at age 8” in 1774, Fraser...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Jan 2020

The Fighting Ground “between the Enemy & the American force”

Asa Lord was born on 29 June 1760 in Saybrook, Connecticut. Around the time he turned sixteen, he signed up for a few months of military service, and he continued to do short-term stints as the war continued.Lord was eighteen years old in April 1779 when...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Jan 2020

Raid on Isaac Hatfield’s House

As I described yesterday, in January 1780 Capts. Samuel Lockwood and Samuel Keeler of the Connecticut militia attacked the home of Isaac Hatfield, Jr., in Morrisania, New York. Hatfield (1748-1822) had been born in America to a substantial farming family...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Jan 2020

Capt. Samuel Lockwood at War

Samuel Lockwood (1737–1807, gravestone shown here courtesy of Find a Grave) of Greenwich, Connecticut, became a second lieutenant in the Continental Army in April 1775.That fall, he joined Gen. Richard Montgomery’s invasion of Canada. On 5...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Jan 2020

Glimpses of Early Blandford

As long as we’re out in Blandford with Henry Knox, we might as well enjoy the town’s eighteenth-century history.Most of the first British settlers in the area were Scotch-Irish, moving west in a bunch from Hopkinton in 1736. They named their...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Jan 2020

America’s First Vampire Investigators

The Connecticut Courant article I quoted yesterday named three men in addition to Isaac Johnson, the paterfamilias so distraught by tuberculosis in his family that he had two of his children’s bodies dug up in 1784. One was the man who wrote the...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Jan 2020

A Double Exhumation in 1784 Connecticut

On 22 June 1784, the Connecticut Courant ran an article which has become highly significant for hunters of vampires and vampire lore. It read:WHEREAS of late years there has been advanced for a certainty, by a certain Quack Doctor, a foreigner, that a...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Jan 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.