The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Jacobites"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Jacobites found 71 posts

Life aboard a Prison Ship

Many of the men who were taken prisoner during and after the 1745 Rebellion were held in prison ships. After Culloden ships could be seen in the Moray Firth, with no room in the town to house all the captives the ships were a floating prison. Even before...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 22 Feb 2020

Carlisle and the Jacobites

The city of Carlisle, located in the northern English county of Cumbria, has special significance in regards to the 1745-46 Jacobite Rising; then a town belonging to the historic county of Cumberland, Carlisle was the site of two sieges at the end of...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 30 May 2019

Dundee and the Jacobites

In the past six months, we have written blog posts on Jacobite connections to the cities of Edinburgh, Stirling, Aberdeen and Glasgow; today, here is one about Dundee. After the deposition of James VII and II in 1688, his loyal supporters felt the need...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 2 Mar 2019

More Jacobite Women

There is information available about a number of female Jacobites. Several of these women have been featured in previous blog posts. Here are a couple more, with details about what each of them did to support the Jacobite cause. Isabella Lumsden Isabella...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 19 Jan 2019

A perspective view of Dilston Hall

“View of hall with gardens and river in foreground, crossed by bridge at right with a courting couple; other figures in foreground including fishermen in centre foreground, a woman with child sitting at right and gardeners at left; poem in three...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 11 Jan 2019

Siege of Fort William

The siege of Fort William began on the 20th of March, 1746. The Jacobites, having just captured the more northerly Fort Augustus after a two-day siege, were eager to expand their territories. The Government leader, the Duke of Cumberland, declared Fort...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 16 Dec 2018

Jacobite Plots

In 1688, William of Orange invaded England and successfully overthrew James VII of Scotland and II of England and Ireland. The following year, William and his wife Mary were crowned joint sovereigns. The deposition of James lead to the formation of the...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 2 Dec 2018

The Skirmish of Tongue

In March 1746, less than a month before the Battle of Culloden, a number of those belonging to the two conflicting sides met at Tongue, a coastal village in the Highlands; there, those loyal to the Jacobite cause were captured, and their ship, Le Prince...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 19 Nov 2018

Viscount Dundee

The first Viscount Dundee was one of the strongest supporters of the Jacobite cause in its beginning. His raising of the Standard was a mark of the start of the First Jacobite Rising in 1689, and his death at the otherwise victorious Battle of Killiecrankie...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 26 Oct 2018

William of Orange

William of Orange was declared King of Scotland, England and Ireland in 1689. This immediately followed the deposition of James VII and II; as a result, William and his wife Mary, who had been proclaimed Queen, were the first people that the Jacobites...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 17 Aug 2018

Essential Historical Research Skills, Number 714: Red Wine

Pukka historians will tell you that the really important research skills are things like objectivity, respect for one’s sources, empathy with the people of the past, a strong command of context, open-mindedness, and the ability to avoid sneezing...
From: Gentlemen and Tarpaulins on 30 Jul 2018

The Palazzo Muti: 18th Century Stuart Court

Located in the Piazza dei Santi Apostoli, Rome, the Palazzo Muti Papazzurri (also known as the Palazzo Balestra) is an important place for those interested in Jacobite history; technically, there is more than one building that has the title Palazzo Muti,...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 19 May 2018

Nairn and the Night Attack

On the 16th of April 1746, the Government army and the Jacobite army fought at Culloden Moor (then known as Drumossie Moor) for their final battle. The day before, the Duke of Cumberland, leader of the Government side, turned twenty-five. He and...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 27 Apr 2018

Mary of Modena

In 1673, Mary of Modena married James, who would go on to become James VII & II (King of Scotland, England and Ireland) twelve years later, before being deposed in 1688. In the same year that her husband was deposed, Mary gave birth to a son...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 14 Apr 2018

A Failure to Communicate: Authority in Eighteenth-Century Newgate

We are delighted to publish this guest post by Esther Brot, who is currently pursuing her PhD in History at King’s College London. She is writing her dissertation on the topic of the Corporation of London and the prisons of the City of London in...
From: Early Modern Prisons on 11 Apr 2018

Edinburgh and the Jacobites

Culloden Battlefield, located a few miles outside of Inverness, the “capital of the Highlands”, is probably the place that people associate most with Charles Edward Stuart and the Jacobites. Before the Battle of Culloden in 1746, the Jacobites...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 7 Apr 2018

Lion vs Elisabeth

Prince Charles Edward Stuart set sail from Nantes at the end of June 1745 on board the frigate Du Teillay. This ship met up with the larger Elisabeth at Belle-Ile before heading to Scotland with some 700 men, 20 cannon, 11,000 arm and 2,000 broadswords....
From: Culloden Battlefield on 2 Mar 2018

The Battle of Falkirk Muir

On the 17th January 1746, just under three months before Culloden, the Jacobites won their last battle. After their success at Prestonpans in September 1745, the general feeling among the Jacobites was one of increased optimism. Charles Edward Stuart,...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 16 Feb 2018

Who wasn’t at Culloden?

We get many people coming through the exhibition here at Culloden Battlefield & Visitor Centre asking where their clan was in the battle and sometimes the answer isn’t always what they expect. Whilst many men from the Jacobite army were indeed...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 2 Feb 2018

Anne Marie d’Orléans: 18th Century Jacobite Heiress

Anne Marie d’Orléans is mostly forgotten today, but in the early eighteenth century, the combination of her royal lineage and Catholic faith meant that, amidst the political uncertainty and civil war, she stood out as a significant figure;...
From: Culloden Battlefield on 27 Jan 2018

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This search feature has a number of purposes:

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Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

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The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

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I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.