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Search Results for "John Dickinson"

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Your search for posts with tags containing John Dickinson found 24 posts

Officers Who Never Saw Combat

HaldWe asked our contributors, “Who is your favorite military officer that never saw any combat?” The intent was to showcase officers who saw no... The post Officers Who Never Saw Combat appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

”A Procession that extended near a Mile and a half”

On rereading the Boston Gazette’s description of the Sons of Liberty 14 Aug 1769 dinner this year, I was struck by the detail that three times the men punctuated their toasts with “A Discharge of Cannon.” Perhaps only one cannon, but...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Aug 2019

Josiah Quincy, Jr.

Josiah Quincy, Jr.’s name is rarely mentioned in history books. This is because his name never appeared at the top of any leaderboard, that... The post Josiah Quincy, Jr. appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

Stephen Moylan: More than a War Hero

Serving on George Washington’s staff were many talented young men, including some who became famous later. Alexander Hamilton served on the staff ably for... The post Stephen Moylan: More than a War Hero appeared first on Journal of the American...

Giving Dickinson His Due

Back in 2012 I compared the number of books lately published about Thomas Paine, supposedly a neglected Founder, with the much smaller number published about John Dickinson. That will probably change after the John Dickinson Writings Project starts to...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Nov 2018

April 14

GUEST CURATOR: Zachary Karpowich What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Pennsylvania Gazette (April 14, 1768).“Among all the WRITERS in favour of the COLONIES, the FARMER shines unrivaled for strength of...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 14 Apr 2018

February 4

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? New-York Gazette Extraordinary [New-York Gazette: Or, the Weekly Post-Boy] (February 4, 1768).“HENDRICK OUDERNAARDE, BROKER, HAS to sell all Sorts of European and West-India...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 4 Feb 2018

The Other Author of “The Liberty Song”

Earlier this month I wrote about “The Liberty Song,” which became popular throughout Britain’s North American colonies in late 1768.The main author of that song, everyone agrees, was the Pennsylvania and Delaware lawyer John Dickinson....
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Jan 2018

John Dickinson’s “Song, to the Tune of Heart of Oak”

On 4 July 1768, John Dickinson, already a delegate to the Stamp Act Congress and the author of Letters from a Farmer in Pennsylvania, wrote to James Otis, Jr., from Philadelphia:I inclose you a song for American freedom. I have long since renounced poetry....
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Jan 2018

The “Farmer” Starts to Speak 250 Years Ago

On 30 Nov 1767, two and a half centuries ago today, the Pennsylvania Chronicle and Universal Advertiser began to publish the series of essays signed “A Farmer.”Those essays were quickly picked up by other printers, first in Philadelphia and...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Nov 2017

“Sent you one of phillis whetleys books”

Yesterday I quoted from a letter that Deborah Cushing sent her husband Thomas in September 1774 when he was serving in the First Continental Congress.When that letter is cited today, it’s usually because Cushing mentioned the poet Phillis Wheatley....
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Apr 2017

Satirizing the Revolution through Popular Song

Think of Revolutionary War lyrics. Does a ditty about a dandified bumpkin out on the town come to mind? “Yankee Doodle” was just one of many satires written during the American Revolution. A wealth of wit pervaded poetry that filled newspapers...

“An object of nearly universal detestation”

After the royal authorities published the private letters they had captured on Benjamin Hichborn in August 1775, what was the fallout for the men who had written those letters? Unfortunately for unabashed gossips, there aren’t a lot of good sources...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Jul 2014

“Genuine Copies of the Intercepted Letters” in the Press

For the royal authorities in Boston, the letters that Benjamin Hichborn had carried from Philadelphia were the equivalent of today’s intercepted radio communications. Those papers contained some sensitive information about the enemy’s army—for example,...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Jul 2014

John Adams and “the Oddity of a great Man”

Abigail Adams wasn’t the only person reporting to her husband John about public reaction in Massachusetts to the arrival of Gen. George Washington and Gen. Charles Lee in early July 1775.Legislative leader James Warren was another Adams confidant. On...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Jul 2014

The Fate of Don Galvez’s Portrait

Yesterday’s posting described how in May 1783 Oliver Pollock gave the Continental Congress a portrait of Don Bernardo de Gálvez, who as Spanish governor of Louisiana had been a strong ally for the new U.S. of A. After being displayed for a day in the...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 May 2014

John Dickinson’s Hit Single: Liberty Song

By 1768, Pennsylvania political activist John Dickinson became a true triple threat. He was already one of the most successful lawyers and businessmen in all of Pennsylvania and Delaware, and was the author of the “Letter from a Farmer” essays,...

Rhode Island Prepares for War

Samuel Ward was one of Rhode Island’s delegates to the First Continental Congress in 1774. There he met John Dickinson of Pennsylvania, Richard Henry Lee of Virginia, and other men pushing for a united opposition to the London government’s strictures...
From: Boston 1775 on 14 Dec 2013

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

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Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.