The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "John Hancock"

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Your search for posts with tags containing John Hancock found 148 posts

September 16

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “George Spriggs, Gardner to John Hancock, Esq.” In the early 1770s, George Spriggs supplied colonists with fruit trees.  In September 1771, he placed advertisements in the...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 16 Sep 2021

Contributor Question: Remembered for the Wrong Reason?

We asked our contributors: Which personality of the American Revolution or the founding era (other than Benedict Arnold) is remembered for the wrong reasons,... The post Contributor Question: Remembered for the Wrong Reason? appeared first on Journal...

“That a General be Appointed to command”

After the events at Lexington and Concord on April 19, it appeared that military force of some sort might be warranted in dealing with... The post “That a General be Appointed to command” appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

April 15

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “The most strict Compliance with the Non-Importation Agreement.” Colonial merchants and shopkeepers often included introductory remarks about the origins of their imported...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 15 Apr 2021

“Upon his Interment a large Mob attended”

As I described yesterday, the funeral of Lt. Gov. Andrew Oliver on 8 Mar 1774 did not go smoothly. Some of Oliver’s close friends and relatives, including his brother, Chief Justice Peter Oliver (shown here), and their in-law, Gov. Thomas Hutchinson,...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Mar 2021

A Funeral Procession for Andrew Oliver

I started this month reviewing the events of early March 1774: the return of the Massachusetts Spy, the death of Lt. Gov. Andrew Oliver (shown here), John Hancock’s Massacre oration, and the second Boston Tea Party.That wasn’t all. Lt. Gov....
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Mar 2021

The Sources for Revere’s Window Art

My second thought on the art that followed the fatal events of early 1770 is perforce not as developed as yesterday’s. Of the three images that Paul Revere illuminated in his windows on the first anniversary of the Boston Massacre in 1771, we can...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Mar 2021

Three New Interviews

A couple of weeks ago I wore collared shirts and shaved almost every day of the week.That’s because I was scheduled to participate a series of online conversations that were recorded for viewing. First, I spoke with Bob Allison and Jonathan Lane...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Mar 2021

“My sincere attachment to the interest of my country”

On the morning of 3 Mar 1774, Andrew Oliver, lieutenant governor of Massachusetts, died. He had previously held the offices of provincial secretary and stamp agent, though of course he never got to do any work in that last capacity.John Adams viewed Oliver...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Mar 2021

Dealing Out the Cards at the B.P.L.

Earlier this month, the Boston Public Library’s Rare Books and Manuscripts department announced that it had finished scanning its entire card catalogue and uploading the result to the Internet Archive. “With this project now complete,”...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Feb 2021

Whatever Happened to Jesse Saville?

On 7 Apr 1770, acting governor Thomas Hutchinson sent the Massachusetts General Court documents from Essex County justices of the peace describing the previous month’s mobbing of Jesse Saville. Hutchinson said Saville “had been most inhumanly...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Nov 2020

Peeking in on Pope Night in 177

Earlier this fall, Boston 1775 reader David Churchill Barrow asked me what Pope Night was like in Boston in 1770, 250 years ago today.After all, that loud, political, and occasionally violent 5th of November holiday fell in between the first two trials...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Nov 2020

Ebenezer Storer, at Your Service

In December 1774, a few months after Hannah (Quincy) Lincoln’s husband Bela died, a Boston merchant named Ebenezer Storer was also widowed.Storer appears here in a pastel portrait rendered by John Singleton Copley in the late 1760s, now at the Metropolitan...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Oct 2020

“No such order as Mr Gridley alludes to”

Scarborough Gridley didn’t just write to Elbridge Gerry seeking back pay in February 1784, as I quoted yesterday.Gridley first went to the president of the Massachusetts Senate to ask for his help. That man was Samuel Adams (shown here). This is...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Sep 2020

“Less fortunate in my Military reputation than some others”

As I recounted yesterday, Gen. George Washington dismissed Maj. Scarborough Gridley from the Continental Army on 24 Sept 1775.Dealing with the major’s father, Col. Richard Gridley, was harder. It took a lot of maneuvering by the commander-in-chief,...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Sep 2020

When John Adams Gave Away His Library

In the summer of 1822, John Adams was feeling generous toward his home town and considering his legacy. The ex-President was then eighty-six years old.On 25 June, Adams deeded to the town of Quincy two tracts of land to fund a stone “Temple”...
From: Boston 1775 on 20 Aug 2020

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.