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Search Results for "John Marston"

Your search for posts with tags containing John Marston found 9 posts

Workshop Theatre of John Marston's 'Antonio's Revenge'

The Playhouse Lab, the Oxford Marston, and The Malone SocietypresentJohn Marston’s Antonio’s Revengea one-day conferenceWorkshop Theatre, University of Leeds – Saturday, 7 July 2018This one-day conference will focus on Marston’s...
From: The Renaissance Diary on 7 Jul 2018

Edward’s Boys in summer 2017

A scene from Edward’s Boys production of The Dutch Courtesan I’ve written lots of posts mentioning Edward’s Boys, the brilliant troupe of boys from King Edward VI School in Stratford-upon-Avon who, under the leadership of Deputy Head...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 10 Jul 2017

Shakespeare’s Schooldays brought to life

King Edward VI School, Stratford-upon-Avon On Tuesday 4 April I addressed the pupils of King Edward VI School in Stratford-upon-Avon, Shakespeare’s School, at their morning assembly, part of our efforts to publicise the town’s two hundred-year...
From: The Shakespeare blog on 7 Apr 2017

A Different Point of View on the “Bunker Hill” Song

As I discussed yesterday, in post-Revolutionary Boston young veterans of the war preserved and passed around the words to a song about the Battle of Bunker Hill written from the British point of view. They had different things to say, however, about who...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Jul 2014

“It has been copied so many times, for the last fifty years”

It’s no surprise that British soldiers composed a song about the Battle of Bunker Hill, as quoted yesterday. After all, they won the fight, and then they had several months in Boston to fill. What’s surprising is that the song was printed and preserved...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Jul 2014

‘Go your ways for an Apostata’: the converting Courtesan

van Honthorst, Smiling Girl, a Courtesan, Holding an Obscene Image, 1625 I’m really delighted to have been given the chance to contribute to the Dutch Courtesan project, an all-singing, all-dancing (and all-acting) web resource that has accompanied...

“Work upon that now”: Some thoughts on oral authority in Eastward Hoe!

George Chapman, Ben Jonson, and John Marston fill Eastward Hoe! (1605) with a number of popular cultural references and allusions.   It is a play of exceptional intertextuality.  While I am currently working on the history and mechanics of the stage...
From: Tympan and Frisket on 7 Apr 2013

Thanksgiving Memories from John Marston

For the holiday I’ll quote John Marston’s recollection of Thanksgiving in Boston before the Revolution. Marston evidently wrote this letter to Anne Adams about 1830, and it was first published in The Treat Family: A Genealogy of Trott, Tratt, and...
From: Boston 1775 on 22 Nov 2012

Q: What do bowling and frottage have in common?

A: RUBBERS Alas, utilising the commonest BrE meaning of the word, I’ve erased this post for a while. My supervisor wisely questioned the decision to blog about this when I could try for a more CV-friendly publication credit and I shall give it the...
From: fourth degree burn on 15 Oct 2012

Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.