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Search Results for "John Mein"

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Your search for posts with tags containing John Mein found 59 posts

The Last of the Boston Chronicle

On 25 June 1770, 250 years ago today, this announcement appeared in the Boston Chronicle: The Printers of the Boston Chronicle return thanks to the Gentlemen, who have so long favoured them with their Subscriptions, and now inform them that, as the Chronicle,...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Jun 2020

June 21

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Desires that all Persons, who have any Accounts open with him, will settle them.” This is the last advertisement from the Boston Chronicle that will be featured by...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 21 Jun 2020

When Hancock Moved on Mein

John Mein arrived in Boston from Scotland in 1764. He first set up a shop with Robert Sandeman, though he wasn’t a member of the Sandemanian sect.The next year, Mein took over the London Book Store on King Street, formerly co-owned by James Rivington....
From: Boston 1775 on 18 May 2020

May 13

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? “WATT’S PSALMS … with a PREFACE of twenty four pages.” John Mein and John Fleeming, printers of the Boston Chronicle, also printed and sold “WATT’S...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 13 May 2020

“A TRAGEDY (Not acted here these seventy-eight years)”

On 1 Feb 1770, a curious notice appeared in the Boston Chronicle, the twice-weekly newspaper published by Scottish immigrants John Mein and John Fleeming.It read:Intended speedily to be actedBy a Company of young Tragedians,A TRAGEDY(Not acted here these...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 Apr 2020

“The Effects of Junius’ Letter”?

Throughout 1769, British politics was roiled by a series of public letters signed “Junius,” attacking the ministry of the Duke of Grafton and promoting William Pitt, by then the Earl of Chatham.The letters combined erudite arguments, apparently...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Feb 2020

“Voted to proceed to the Business of the Meeting”

On 23 Jan 1770, as described yesterday, the Bostonians meeting about non-importation in Faneuil Hall received a letter from acting governor Thomas Hutchinson declaring their gathering to be illegal and ordering them to disperse.In response, those men...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Jan 2020

January 3

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “The whole taken from the Boston Chronicle, in which they were first published.” Newspaper printers participated in networks of exchange in eighteenth-century America,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 3 Jan 2020

The Career of Captain Dundas

Once I saw that “Captain Dundas” had come up in the dispute between James Otis, Jr., and John Robinson, I had to figure out who that was and what role he played in the coming of the Revolution.In September 1769, Otis called Dundas “a...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Dec 2019

“Description of the POPE, 1769.”

The Fifth of November was a festival of misrule for eighteenth-century colonial Boston, which locals called “Pope Night.” But the celebration actually followed many strict traditions. One was that when 5 November fell on a Sunday, as it did...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Nov 2019

“A young Lad (belonging to the Office) fir’d a Gun”

The report of someone inside John Mein and John Fleeming’s print shop firing a gun at Boston’s first tar-and-feathers procession on 28 Oct 1769 raises a number of questions. First is the matter of how many guns were involved. Edes and Gill’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 Nov 2019

“Carting the feather’d Informer thro’ the principal Streets in Town”

John Mein going under cover didn’t end the violence in Boston on Saturday, 28 Oct 1769. In fact, that date saw the town’s first tarring and feathering. Though Boston became notorious in the British Empire for tar-and-feathers attacks in the...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Oct 2019

“If he appeared abroad he should be made a Sacrifice”

As described yesterday, late in the afternoon of 28 Oct 1769, a group of Boston merchants approached the Boston Chronicle printer John Mein on King Street in Boston. Mein was an increasingly vocal supporter of the royal government, in turn supported by...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Oct 2019

A Sestercentennial Stand-Off on King Street

By publishing Customs house documents that embarrassed the Whig merchants of Boston, John Mein knew that he made himself unpopular.In fact, a confidential informant, the painter George Mason, told Customs Collector Joseph Harrison on 20 Oct 1769 that...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Oct 2019

John Mein and the “Well Disposed”

Since 17 Aug 1769, John Mein had been publishing manifests of vessels arriving in the port of Boston in his Boston Chronicle newspaper.I’ve called those leaks from the Customs service, but it’s possible all Mein had to do was go to the office...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Oct 2019

October 26

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Boston Chronicle (October 26, 1769). “Printed in AMERICA.” John Mein was an ardent Tory. In the late 1760s, he and John Fleeming published the Boston Chronicle, one...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 26 Oct 2019

“Mr. Otis made a Trip (as they call it) at Mr. Robinson”

In the 25 Sept 1769 Boston Gazette, printers Benjamin Edes and John Gill ran two more eyewitness accounts of the fight between James Otis, Jr., and John Robinson. One came from Thomas Brett, a merchant from Ireland. He said that on 5 September he was...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Oct 2019

James Otis and John Robinson

Before the month ends, I must address the sestercentennial of a significant moment in Revolutionary politics. Digging into Harvard students’ misbehavior in a Cambridge tavern, fun as that was, put off the important task of examining top officeholders’...
From: Boston 1775 on 29 Sep 2019

“What an unparallel’d Stock of Assurance & Self-Confidence”

In the fall of 1769, Boston’s non-importation controversy heated up. The town’s merchants, supported and pushed by the radical Whigs, had agreed not to order anything but necessities from Britain until Parliament repealed the Townshend duties.Boston’s...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Sep 2019

Duncan Ingraham, Justice of the Peace

Yesterday I quoted two depositions of British soldiers taken prisoner on 19 Apr 1775—John Bateman of the 52nd Regiment and James Marr of the 4th.Both depositions were dated 23 April and attested to by the same two justices of the peace: Dr. John...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 May 2019

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