The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "John Pitcairn"

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Your search for posts with tags containing John Pitcairn found 26 posts

Lexington and Concord: A Case Study in Leadership and Direct Action

The British approach to its American colony in 1775 offers valuable lessons for historians and military professionals in the synthesis between the levels of... The post Lexington and Concord: A Case Study in Leadership and Direct Action appeared first...

Did Isaac Freeman Kill Maj. John Pitcairn?

The centerpiece of Isaac Freeman’s 1780 petition to the Massachusetts General Court, the basis of his request for compensation and the setting for his expression of ultra-patriotism, is his description of having fought at the Battle of Bunker Hill:Your...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Jun 2019

Isaac Freeman’s Petition

This item appeared in the 1 Jan 1781 Boston Gazette, issued by Benjamin Edes:Messrs. PRINTERS,Your publishing the following Copy of a Petition presented to the General Assembly in their late Sessions, may probably amuse some of your Readers, at this barren...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Jun 2019

The Myths of Lt. Col. James Abercrombie’s Death

Lt. Col. James Abercrombie (1732-1775) led the battalion of British grenadiers, detached from their regiments, at the Battle of Bunker Hill. He was mortally wounded, becoming the most senior British officer to die in the fight. Not only did Abercrombie...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Jun 2019

“The said Marr further declared…”

As Don Hagist showed yesterday, it’s unlikely that Pvt. John Bateman was close enough to the Lexington common on 19 Apr 1775 to see the first shots there. As a grenadier of the 52nd Regiment, he was probably in the middle of the British column,...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 May 2019

“The prisoners at Concord in free conversation”

The Rev. William Gordon visited British prisoners in the Concord jail and wrote about it in the form of a letter dated 17 May 1775. Though from England, Gordon served a meeting in Roxbury and was a strong supporter of the Massachusetts cause. He happily...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 May 2019

Lt. William Sutherland’s Wild Ride

Yesterday I quoted (Alexander Cain quoting) Lt. William Tidd of the Lexington militia company on how a mounted British officer had chased him off the common on 19 Apr 1775.I suspect that officer was Lt. William Sutherland, and he wasn’t chasing...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Apr 2019

EXTRA: Who Killed Pitcairn?

The Journal of the American Revolution has just published an article by me titled “Peter Salem? Salem Poor? Who Killed Major John Pitcairn?” This exploration of one aspect of the Battle of Bunker Hill grew out of a series of postings here...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Jun 2018

Peter Salem? Salem Poor? Who Killed Major John Pitcairn?

Maj. John Pitcairn of the British marines became notorious among New Englanders after the Battle of Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775. The... The post Peter Salem? Salem Poor? Who Killed Major John Pitcairn? appeared first on Journal of the American...

The Debate Over Newman and Pulling

The Rev. John Lee Watson was pretty relentless in arguing his claim that John Pulling, not Robert Newman, had hung the lanterns in Old North Church on 18 Apr 1775. On 20 July 1876, Watson published his letter in the Boston Daily Advertiser. In November...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Apr 2018

John Pulling and the Lanterns in the Old North Steeple

In 1875 Old North Church celebrated the centennial of the start of the Revolutionary War and the role that its steeple had played in that event.The rector, the Rev. Henry Burroughs, credited Robert Newman, the church’s sexton, with hanging the two...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Apr 2018

Open House at Wright Tavern in Concord, 15 Oct.

On Saturday 15 October, there will be a free open house at the Wright Tavern in Concord. This will be the first time in decades that the ground floor of that 1747 building will be open to the public.In 1775 the tavern’s location near the center...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Oct 2016

Seeking a Clear Image of Moll Pitcher

To figure out what sort of fortune-telling Mary “Moll” Pitcher of Lynn did requires getting around the romanticized descriptions and legends that grew over the nineteenth century. For example, in Moll Pitcher’s Prophecies; or, The American...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Aug 2016

Forgotten Connections and Divided Loyalties

We would very much like to welcome a new guest to our blog, Avellina Balestri (alias Rosaria Marie), she is a Catholic freelance writer who resides in the scenic and historic Penn-Mar borderlands. She is a founding member and Editor-in-Chief...
From: All Things Georgian on 5 Jul 2016

The Life of Catherina Pitcairn

Today we take a more detailed look at one of the people mentioned in our recent biography of the eighteenth-century courtesan, Grace Dalrymple Elliott, An Infamous Mistress. Our subject today is Catherina Pitcairn who was first cousin to Grace; Elizabeth...
From: All Things Georgian on 10 Mar 2016

Reports of Lt. Col. James Abercrombie’s Death

The highest-ranking British officer to be killed at the Battle of Bunker Hill was Lt. Col. James Abercrombie, commander of a special battalion of grenadiers. Sometimes Salem Poor is credited with shooting Abercrombie rather than the most popular target...
From: Boston 1775 on 23 Jun 2014

Capt. Bancroft’s “severe struggle to escape out of the fort”

I’ve been quoting the account of the Bunker Hill battle set down by a grandson of Capt. Ebenezer Bancroft reportedly around 1826. When we last left the captain and his Dunstable men, the British had made their third advance on the Breed’s Hill redoubt...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Jun 2014

Viewing the “Shot Heard” Exhibit at the Concord Museum

Last week I took in the Concord Museum’s new “Shot Heard Round the World” exhibit about the events of 18-19 Apr 1775. It was quite an impressive gathering of artifacts related to one historic day. This is definitely a military-based show. I counted...
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Apr 2014

Sgt. Monroe on Capt. Parker

Yesterday I quoted the Rev. Theodore Parker telling the story of his grandfather John Parker’s words to his Lexington militia company on 19 Apr 1775: “If they want [or mean] to have a war, let it begin here.”In 1858 Parker told the historian George...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 Apr 2014

Who Shot First? The Americans!

At dawn on April 19, 1775, the British detachment of light infantry under Maj. Pitcairn reached Lexington, about two-thirds the way to Concord. There they found the local Lexington Militia Company under Capt. John Parker waiting for them, all armed and...

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