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Search Results for "John Rowe"

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Your search for posts with tags containing John Rowe found 62 posts

Looking Back on the Owen Richards Attack

Last December, starting here, I wrote about the tar-and-feathers attack on a Customs employee named Owen Richards in May 1770. The fallout from that event lasted for years, so I’m going to resume the story. But first, for review, here’s the...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Apr 2021

“Upon his Interment a large Mob attended”

As I described yesterday, the funeral of Lt. Gov. Andrew Oliver on 8 Mar 1774 did not go smoothly. Some of Oliver’s close friends and relatives, including his brother, Chief Justice Peter Oliver (shown here), and their in-law, Gov. Thomas Hutchinson,...
From: Boston 1775 on 31 Mar 2021

A Funeral Procession for Andrew Oliver

I started this month reviewing the events of early March 1774: the return of the Massachusetts Spy, the death of Lt. Gov. Andrew Oliver (shown here), John Hancock’s Massacre oration, and the second Boston Tea Party.That wasn’t all. Lt. Gov....
From: Boston 1775 on 30 Mar 2021

A “very Cheerfull” Christmas at the Rowes’

The merchant John Rowe was one of Boston’s leading Anglicans, so he celebrated Christmas while his Congregationalist neighbors generally ignored the holiday. Here’s how Rowe described 25 Dec 1770 in his published diary, 250 years ago today:...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Dec 2020

The Departures of the Rev. Mr. Mosley

On Easter in 1772, as I described yesterday, Trinity Church of Pomfret, Connecticut, formally set up its governing structure.The minister was the Rev. Richard Mosley, a Cambridge University graduate and former Royal Navy chaplain. The man who had founded...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Nov 2020

Peeking in on Pope Night in 177

Earlier this fall, Boston 1775 reader David Churchill Barrow asked me what Pope Night was like in Boston in 1770, 250 years ago today.After all, that loud, political, and occasionally violent 5th of November holiday fell in between the first two trials...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Nov 2020

Rev. Richard Mosley and the Boylston-Molineux Marriage

A couple of days ago, I mentioned the Rev. Richard Mosley, chaplain of H.M.S. Salisbury. He wrote about Capt. Thomas Preston’s trial for murder.Mosley’s presence may help in the quest to answer one of the vexing genealogical mysteries of pre-Revolutionary...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 Nov 2020

The Landlord of Liberty Tree

This is how the merchant John Rowe described Boston’s first public protest against the Stamp Act in his diary:A Great Number of people assembled at Deacon Elliots Corner this morning to see the Stamp Officer hung in Effigy with a Libel on the Breast,...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Aug 2020

Non-Importation to the End

In the summer of 1770 the Boston Whigs were dealing with the challenge of mixed results. As young printer John Boyle recorded in his chronicle of events on 10 June 1770:An Act of Parliament is received for repealing part of an Act for granting Duties...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Aug 2020

The Speakman Brothers at War

When we left the Barnes and Speakman families in Marlborough in the fall of 1770, they appear to have arrived at some sort of truce.Henry Barnes continued to run a potash manufactory and general store. Older brother William Speakman probably managed the...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Jul 2020

Family Business and Politics in Marlborough

Personal finance and politics intersected for the Speakman family and their neighbors in the summer of 1770.As I started to discuss back here, Thomas Speakman acquired property in Marlborough before being killed on the Lake Champlain battlefront in 1757.His...
From: Boston 1775 on 11 Jul 2020

“Become a violent advocate in the Cause of Liberty”

As recounted yesterday, Capt. Thomas Speakman was killed in the French and Indian War in January 1757.Though I haven’t seen his probate records, Speakman appears to have left a considerable estate to his wife Mary and their children, including properties...
From: Boston 1775 on 9 Jul 2020

After James Otis “behaved very madly’

On 8 May 1770, 250 years ago today, Bostonians gathered for one of their annual town meetings.Every March, the white men of the town elected its selectmen and other officials for the coming year. Every May, a smaller section of those white men, those...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 May 2020

A New President for Harvard College

To be sure, there were other things going on in Massachusetts in March 1770 besides responses to the Boston Massacre. On 21 March, Harvard College installed a new president, the Rev. Samuel Locke.Locke had been born in Woburn on 23 Nov 1731, the oldest...
From: Boston 1775 on 25 Mar 2020

“Otis got into a mad freak to-night”

With everything else going on in Boston in the wake of the Boston Massacre, I don’t want to lose track of James Otis’s mental state.In early September 1769, Otis was speaking extravagantly, monopolizing conversation, and annoying even his...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Mar 2020

The Troops’ Schedule for “embarkation for the castle”

One of the great things about the Sestercentennial of the Boston Massacre earlier this month is that I got to hear questions and new perspectives I could investigate. In the coming days I’ll go back over some of those points, starting with the question...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Mar 2020

“They all four were buried in one grave”

On the afternoon of Thursday, 8 Mar 1770—250 years ago today—Boston had a huge public funeral for the first four people to die after the Boston Massacre. This was only eleven days after the funeral for Christopher Seider, reportedly attended...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Mar 2020

“My Eyes never beheld such a funeral”

Yesterday I described how the Boston Whigs prepared for young Christopher Seider’s funeral procession on Monday, 26 Feb 1770. The first newspaper published after that date was the 1 March Boston News-Letter, and it reported on the event this way:a...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Feb 2020

“All possible exertions to stem the current of the mob”

Richard Clarke and Sons weren’t the only merchants tapped by the East India Company to import tea into Boston in 1773. The others were:Business partners Benjamin Faneuil, Jr. (1730-1787) and Joshua Winslow (1737-1775).Thomas Hutchinson, Jr. (1740-1811),...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Dec 2019

“For being accessory in beating Mr. Otis”

Back in September, before other Sestercentennial anniversaries came along, I started to explore the 5 Sept 1769 brawl in the British Coffee-House between James Otis, Jr., leader of the Boston Whigs, and John Robinson, one of His Majesty’s Commissioners...
From: Boston 1775 on 2 Dec 2019

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