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Search Results for "John Singleton Copley"

Showing 1 - 20 of 28

Your search for posts with tags containing John Singleton Copley found 28 posts

“Charles has been guilty of a trick”

On 26 May 1786, John Adams wrote from London to his eldest son, congratulating John Quincy Adams on getting into Harvard College: Give me leave to congratulate you on your Admission into the Seat of the Muses, our dear Alma Mater, where I hope you will...
From: Boston 1775 on 18 Sep 2019

“A sort of an assembly at Concert Hall”

Yesterday we left the Boston Whigs in mid-December 1768 crowing over the failure of pro-Crown officials and army officers to pull off a dancing assembly. That triumph didn’t last, however, and on 23 December the Whigs had to report:It may now be...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Feb 2019

Lt. Henry Barry: “sappy looking chap” or “calm, worthy man”?

The British army officer who asked Henry Knox to publish a political pamphlet in January 1775, as discussed yesterday, was Lt. Henry Barry (1750-1822), shown here as J. S. Copley painted him about tens years later.We know about Barry’s authorship...
From: Boston 1775 on 16 Jan 2019

A Portrait Vandalized at Harvard

On 26 Nov 1765 the Harvard Corporation made the following decision:Whereas Governr. [Francis] Bernard, as we are inform’d by our Treasr. hath offer’d to give his Picture to the College, Thereupon unanimously Voted, That We thankfully accept...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Oct 2018

“The same facts of…the late Samuel Adams”

In 1815 and 1816, Joseph Delaplaine (1777-1824, shown here) published one and a half volumes of Delaplaine’s Repository of the Lives and Portraits of Distinguished American Characters.The first biography in the second volume was about Samuel Adams....
From: Boston 1775 on 19 Aug 2018

Living History in Quincy, 18 Aug.

On Saturday, 18 August, the Dorothy Quincy Homestead in Quincy is hosting a living-history event highlighting the Quincy, Hancock, and Adams families. The title for this event is “Lydia, Liberty, and Loyality.”Those three families had a lot...
From: Boston 1775 on 15 Aug 2018

“Volleys of Stones, Brickbats, Sticks or anything else that came to hand”

Yesterday we left Customs Collector Joseph Harrison just after he confiscated the sloop Liberty from John Hancock. He thought he had escaped retaliation from the waterfront crowd. He thought wrong. As laid out on this website titled “Collectors...
From: Boston 1775 on 13 Jun 2018

“With child Quaco, about nine months old”

Here’s another connection between the Worcester Art Museum’s portrait of Lucretia Murray and the institution of slavery in Massachusetts.John Singleton Copley painted that portrait in 1763, two years after Lucretia Chandler had married John...
From: Boston 1775 on 4 May 2018

New Light from Museum Labels

Last month the Hyperallergic site published an interesting essay by Sarah E. Bond titled “Can Art Museums Help Illuminate Early American Connections to Slavery?” The essay describes how the Worcester Art Museum has added information about...
From: Boston 1775 on 1 May 2018

The 18th Century fashion for Turbans

It’s been a while since we wrote a fashion post, so to make up for that we’re going to take a look at a piece of headgear – the turban, a piece of headwear that according to Vogue is making a comeback for this Spring and Summer. We...
From: All Things Georgian on 30 Jan 2018

Joseph Pope’s Orrery in “The Philosophy Chamber”

Eventually, Joseph Pope’s orrery went to Harvard College. I’ll tell that story in more detail sometime, but today I’m highlighting how the machine is on display once more as part of the Harvard Art Museums’ new exhibit, “The...
From: Boston 1775 on 19 May 2017

The Tate’s New Copley—or Is It?

At the end of last year, the Tate Britain museum in London announced that it had accepted the gift of a significant John Singleton Copley painting from 1776, saying: The Fountaine Family shows how Copley adapted his style to the British market, emulating...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 May 2017

Hearts of Oak on Canvas: Watson and the Shark

A single day of gory trauma defined the life of Brook Watson. As a teenager, he had gone swimming in Havana harbor, where a... The post Hearts of Oak on Canvas: Watson and the Shark appeared first on Journal of the American Revolution.

After Trumbull—Not After Copley After All

Back in January, I saw this painting on Twitter, identified as a portrait of Gen. George Washington by John Singleton Copley.I replied that Copley never painted Washington.The person who posted the image reported that the Art U.K. site actually identified...
From: Boston 1775 on 28 Feb 2017

Kamensky on Copley in Medford, 18 Jan.

Here’s a passage from Jane Kamensky’s biography of John Singleton Copley, A Revolution in Color, that I quite enjoyed. This describes a period in 1774, when Copley was embarking on his long-dreamed-of Grand Tour of Europe to study art. He...
From: Boston 1775 on 10 Jan 2017

Another Watson, Another Shark

Around here, “Watson and the Shark” is the John Singleton Copley painting of Brook Watson’s rescue from a shark in Havana. The Museum of Fine Arts has one of several copies Copley made for Watson.At English Historical Fiction Authors,...
From: Boston 1775 on 26 Jul 2016

Talks by Anderson and Kamensky at the B.P.L.

This month the Boston Public Library will host two lectures on the American Revolution, one by a novelist whose latest book is nonfiction, and one by a history professor who has cowritten a novel. Wednesday, 14 OctoberM. T. Anderson, “A Revolution...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Oct 2015

“Thread, Wool and Silk” at Old South

Old South Meeting House is hosting a series of events this fall on costume and textile-making, and what they say about the economy, social class, politics, and other matters. Friday, 9 October, 12:15-1:00 P.M.Lady in the Blue Dress...and You!Painted in...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Oct 2015

Early American History Schedules at the M.H.S.

The Massachusetts Historical Society has announced its schedule of seminars for the upcoming academic year. These come in four series: on early America, environmental history, urban history, and the history of women and gender.I’ve picked out those...
From: Boston 1775 on 24 Sep 2015

N. C. Wyeth’s History Paintings in Sandwich

Heritage Museums and Gardens in Sandwich is hosting an exhibit titled “The Wyeths: America Reflected” through 27 September.Of the forty-five paintings on display, sixteen were created by N. C. Wyeth for a book titled Poems of American Patriotism,...
From: Boston 1775 on 12 Jun 2015

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