The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "John Wilkes"

Showing 1 - 20 of 28

Your search for posts with tags containing John Wilkes found 28 posts

“Description of the POPE, 1769.”

The Fifth of November was a festival of misrule for eighteenth-century colonial Boston, which locals called “Pope Night.” But the celebration actually followed many strict traditions. One was that when 5 November fell on a Sunday, as it did...
From: Boston 1775 on 6 Nov 2019

“At the House of Mr. Daniel Harrington”

On 16 Oct 1769, Edes and Gill’s Boston Gazette ran this news item with the dateline “Lexington, Aug. 31, 1769.”: Very early in the Morning, the young Ladies of this Town, to the Number of 45, assembled at the House of Mr. Daniel...
From: Boston 1775 on 5 Aug 2019

A Wilkes Cufflink from Brunswick Town

Just a few hours after I posted about the archeological discovery of a tavern in Brunswick Town, North Carolina, a tweet from Warren Bingham alerted me to a new announcement from that team.One artifact when cleaned up turned out to be a cufflink ornamented...
From: Boston 1775 on 8 Jul 2019

When Wartime Riots Paralyzed London

On 2 June 1780, as I described yesterday, a crowd of over 50,000 people surrounded Parliament while Lord George Gordon presented a petition demanding a return to strictures on Catholics.The House of Commons dismissed that petition, and the crowd dispersed...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Jun 2019

Catharine Macaulay, England’s First Female Whig Historian: the War Begins, 1775

By the end of 1774, Catharine Macaulay had met Benjamin Rush, Arthur Lee, Richard Marchant, and Benjamin Franklin, and had corresponded with John Dickinson, James... The post Catharine Macaulay, England’s First Female Whig Historian: the War...

William Palfrey at the Boston Massacre

William Palfrey (1741-1780, shown here) was an apprentice and business protégé of Nathaniel Wheelwright, one of Boston’s leading merchants in the early 1760s. Wheelwright’s personal notes circulated like currency in the Boston...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Mar 2019

A select collection of the most interesting letters on the government, liberty…

Title: A select collection of the most interesting letters on the government, liberty, and constitution of England : which have appeared in the different news-papers from the elevation of Lord Bute, to the death of the Earl of Egremont. With several...
From: Recent Antiquarian Acquisitions on 25 Feb 2019

February 7

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? “Subscriptions are taken … by S. Hall in Salem.” Essex Gazette (February 7, 1769). This subscription notice for “The WORKS of the celebrated John Wilkes,...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 7 Feb 2019

January 13

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? New-London Gazette (January 13, 1769). “Subscriptions are taken by all the Booksellers.” A subscription notice for “THE WORKS OF THE CELEBRATED JOHN WILKES”...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 13 Jan 2019

December 18

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago this week? New-York Journal (December 15, 1768). “Subscriptions are taken by all the Booksellers at New-York, Philadelphia, Boston, and Charles-Town, South-Carolina.” A subscription...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 18 Dec 2018

December 17

What was advertised in a colonial American newspaper 250 years ago today? Providence Gazette (December 17, 1768).“A NEW EDITION. … THE New-England TOWN and COUNTRY Almanack.” With only two weeks remaining before the new year, John Carter...
From: The Adverts 250 Project on 17 Dec 2018

“No appointment of this sort could have been more unpopular”

As described last week, on 26 Oct 1768 Gov. Francis Bernard told his Council that the royal army had started renting buildings around the center of Boston to convert into barracks.That news couldn’t have come as a surprise to the Boston Whigs. Three...
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Nov 2018

The Rise of John Adams, Boston Lawyer

Between the Liberty riot and the controversy over the Circular Letter, I had to neglect another significant Revolutionary development in June 1768: the entrance of John Adams into Boston politics. Adams grew up in Braintree and returned to that town to...
From: Boston 1775 on 3 Jul 2018

A Letter on London Politics

Edward Griffin Porter’s Rambles in Old Boston (1886) quotes this letter sent to the private teacher John Leach in Boston. It offers a glimpse of radical politicians in London and of the Boston Whigs’ attempts to make common cause with...
From: Boston 1775 on 17 Nov 2017

James Townsend, Lord Mayor with a Secret?

James Townsend (1737-1787) was a London alderman from 1769 to his death, sheriff of London in 1769-70 and Lord Mayor in 1772-73. He was also a Member of Parliament for two stints, in 1767-74 and 1782-87. Unlike his father, who allied with George Grenville,...
From: Boston 1775 on 27 Jul 2017

John Wilkes and Knighton Gorges Manor House

In the late eighteenth-century, John Wilkes, journalist, radical and politician, took a cottage on the Isle of Wight in which he installed his middle aged mistress Amelia Arnold and subsequently he was a frequent guest at Knighton Gorges Manor, the nearby...
From: All Things Georgian on 13 Jun 2017

The Privilege of Printing Parliamentary Debates

Every so often I’ve mentioned how in the 1760s the British press was wary of reporting the exact language of Parliament’s debates.There’s no official record of the debate over the Stamp Act, for instance, or the debate to repeal it....
From: Boston 1775 on 7 Jun 2016

Lanterns on Liberty Tree

On the night of Monday, 19 May 1766, with fireworks going off all over Boston Common to celebrate the repeal of the Stamp Act, Whigs hung forty-five lanterns on Liberty Tree in the South End.That number had plenty of political symbolism. The royal government...
From: Boston 1775 on 21 May 2016

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.