The Early Modern Commons

Search Results for "Josephine"

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Your search for posts with tags containing Josephine found 40 posts

Memories of a violent era — and why I became a Canadian

JFK was murdered on November 22, 1963, fifty-five years ago today. I was nineteen and in university. I don’t remember the moment I learned — How is that possible? — but the images and the shock of it are indelible in my memory....
From: Baroque Explorations on 22 Nov 2018

La Chantereine revealed

While researching The Game of Hope, intrepid traveller and fellow Francophil Ann Coombs sent me photos she took at a special exhibition at Malmaison. This was the one that took my breath away: It’s a mock-up of the house Josephine rented before...
From: Baroque Explorations on 6 Mar 2018

Subscribe to my newsletter and get a chance to win a book or an Audible edition of the Josephine B. Trilogy

I’ve a newsletter about to go out, and I want to remind my wonderful readers who aren’t on my newsletter mailing list that you’re missing a chance to win one of my books — or (for the first time!) win an Audible edition of the...
From: Baroque Explorations on 27 Feb 2018

On Hortense’s creative process and how “Partant pour la Syrie” came into being

Hortense was an exceptionally creative person. At Madame Campan’s Institute she was fortunate to have Isabey for an art instructor and Jadin for music. Hortense painted and composed songs throughout her life, but she is most known for the song “Partant...
From: Baroque Explorations on 23 Feb 2018

Guest Post by William Ellis-Rees – ‘Empress Josephine and the creation of Malmaison’

We would once again like to welcome back to our blog, Classics teacher and author of  The Elephant of Exeter Change: A Tale of Cruelty and Confinement in Georgian London, William Ellis-Rees. William’s guest post this time has as its subject,...
From: All Things Georgian on 16 Jan 2018

Katherine Howard's Age

Five years ago, I published a blog post about the date of birth of Katherine Howard, fifth wife of Henry VIII. In the course of researching and writing about her life, I became increasingly aware of the influence that misconceptions about her continued...
From: Conor Byrne on 8 Jun 2017

Who Josephine Tey Really Was (and Richard III)

The Wall Street Journal published a review by Carl Rollyson of a new biography of Josephine Tey by Jennifer Morag Henderson. "Josephine Tey" was one of two pseudonyms of Elizabeth MacKintosh. She also used the nom-de-plume "Gordon Daviot" when writing...

Why Do Libraries Bring Out The Best in Us?

A young JCLI volunteer (my daughter!) protesting the library’s closure. I don’t want to bore you with the story of my local library—I’ve told it a gajillion times. If you haven’t read it, you can do so here or here (I’m...
From: Out of Time on 13 Apr 2016

Was Josepine very promiscuous?

Portrait of Josephine before she met Napoleon. It is always hard for me to read biographies about Josephine. I’ve yet to read one I don’t have a quibble with. The same holds for a “Great Lives” BBC broadcast I listened to recently...
From: Baroque Explorations on 30 Nov 2015

May Blogroll: Silver Screen Edition

In the lull between the distribution of final assignments and the deluge of grading, I’ve been indulging in some post-conference season silver screen therapy. Two of my favorite period shows are back on the air, and PBS has a new mini-series.…...
From: Bite Thumbnails on 5 May 2015

‘(Truth is ) the Daughter of Time': Josephine Tey and the ‘reputation’ of King Richard III

The topicality of writing about Richard III in the week leading up to the celebrations surrounding his reburial seems rather obvious- and possibly a bit of overkill, really- but nevertheless, in the hype surrounding the details of the events planned for...
From: renaissanceissues on 18 Mar 2015

The essential first step on the path to publication

Memory snap-shot: my father at the kitchen table, leafing through an issue of the New Yorker. He turns the last page and pushes the magazine away. “I didn’t get a single one.” “Anatomy of a New Yorker cartoon,” a Ted...
From: Baroque Explorations on 31 Dec 2014

The amazing French Revolution Digital Archive: research heaven

Stanford University in the U.S. and the Bibliothèque national de France have collaborated in creating the French Revolution Digital Archive, an astonishing collection of documents on the French Revolution. A search of the image database revealed this...
From: Baroque Explorations on 30 Dec 2014

Online amusements: Josephine—the sorrowful wife?—and Napoleon’s Tweets

I’ve recently started using the “Never miss a thing online” Mention app. Just what I don’t need—right?—but being a Social Media Nerd, and terminally curious, I thought I’d give it a try. For starters I searched my...
From: Baroque Explorations on 9 Dec 2014

Joséphine crowned, 2nd December 1804

Sunday, the second of December 1804 was the coldest day of the year, with snow overnight and freezing rain the next morning, which turned the streets of Paris to slush. Spirits in the French capital were still high though for it was the much anticipated...
From: Madame Guillotine on 2 Dec 2014

Bringing “Sunny Now & Then” to light—the mystery of the writing process

I just made a risky move! I’ve offered the first chapter of Sunny Now & Then—an unpublished novel I wrote in 1989—to subscribers of my newsletter. Sunny is an eccentric 80-year-old who is somewhat inconveniently possessed by a spirit....
From: Baroque Explorations on 30 Nov 2014

An old hat, a necklace, and a letter likely rescued from the trash sell for close to 6 million

Both Josephine and Napoleon have been much in the news, of late. One of Napoleon’s hats sold at auction for over 2 million dollars.    A pearl and diamond necklace believed to have been owned by Josephine went for almost 3.5 million. And,...
From: Baroque Explorations on 28 Nov 2014

Josephine: Desire, Ambition, Napoleon

‘This is the incredible rise and unbelievable fall of a woman whose energy and ambition is often overshadowed by Napoleon’s military might. In this triumphant biography, Kate Williams tells Josephine’s searing story, of sexual obsession, politics...
From: Madame Guillotine on 6 Oct 2014

Introducing Marie Anne Lenormand, “The Sibyl of the Faubourg Saint-Germain”

Part of my research  for writing my first Young Adult novel about Josephine‘s daughter Hortense involves fortune-telling, mysticism and communing with ghosts. Yes, all quite delicious! Madame Lenormand (or Le Normand) was a famous fortune-teller...
From: Baroque Explorations on 6 Sep 2014

“What am I working on?” Question #2 in the Writers’ Blog Tour

I explained in my last post what the Writers’ Blog Tour is about. Basically, writers answer the same four questions: Why do I write what I do? What am I working on? How does my work differ from other work in its genre? How does my writing process...
From: Baroque Explorations on 12 Jul 2014

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Notes on Post Tags Search

By default, this searches for any categories containing your search term: eg, Tudor will also find Tudors, Tudor History, etc. Check the 'exact' box to restrict searching to categories exactly matching your search. All searches are case-insensitive.

This is a search for tags/categories assigned to blog posts by their authors. The terminology used for post tags varies across different blog platforms, but WordPress tags and categories, Blogspot labels, and Tumblr tags are all included.

This search feature has a number of purposes:

1. to give site users improved access to the content EMC has been aggregating since August 2012, so they can look for bloggers posting on topics they're interested in, explore what's happening in the early modern blogosphere, and so on.

2. to facilitate and encourage the proactive use of post categories/tags by groups of bloggers with shared interests. All searches can be bookmarked for reference, making it possible to create useful resources of blogging about specific news, topics, conferences, etc, in a similar fashion to Twitter hashtags. Bloggers could agree on a shared tag for posts, or an event organiser could announce one in advance, as is often done with Twitter hashtags.

Caveats and Work in Progress

This does not search post content, and it will not find any informal keywords/hashtags within the body of posts.

If EMC doesn't find any <category> tags for a post in the RSS feed it is classified as uncategorized. These and any <category> 'uncategorized' from the feed are omitted from search results. (It should always be borne in mind that some bloggers never use any kind of category or tag at all.)

This will not be a 'real time' search, although EMC updates content every few hours so it's never very far behind events.

The search is at present quite basic and limited. I plan to add a number of more sophisticated features in the future including the ability to filter by blog tags and by dates. I may also introduce RSS feeds for search queries at some point.

Constructing Search Query URLs

If you'd like to use an event tag, it's possible to work out in advance what the URL will be, without needing to visit EMC and run the search manually (though you might be advised to check it works!). But you'll need to use URL encoding as appropriate for any spaces or punctuation in the tag (so it might be a good idea to avoid them).

This is the basic structure:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s={search term or phrase}

For example, the URL for a simple search for categories containing London:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=london

The URL for a search for the exact category Gunpowder Plot:

http://emc.historycarnival.org/searchcat?s=Gunpowder%20Plot&exact=on

In this more complex URL, %20 is the URL encoding for a space between words and &exact=on adds the exact category requirement.

I'll do my best to ensure that the basic URL construction (searchcat?s=...) is stable and persistent as long as the site is around.